Tag Archives: Woodrow Wilson

Day #7, Podcast #2 of the “Night of Terror”: Marguerite’s Musings

Marguerite's Musings with Marguerite Kearnsby Marguerite Kearns

Day #7. Audio Podcast #2 gets us close to the women of the Occoquan Workhouse We get to know them as people. The “Night of Terror” resulted from an official government policy to push the activists from the National Woman’s Party into a corner so they’d back down and stop the picketing the White House. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson had his hands full when he discovered that these determined women wouldn’t give up on the issue of women voting.

These audio podcasts are great when moving us back into time with feeling. They aren’t long either. Just three or four minutes a podcast, with a total of eight.

The “Night of Terror” isn’t just something I dreamed up to get your attention. I’ve been blogging a total of six days so far in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

Be illuminated by Podcast #2 of the audio series, the “Night of Terror.” Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West. From Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920.

Video reminder to follow the “Night of Terror” podcast series.

Let’s get behind Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in funding and building a memorial to the brave women who picketed the White House and experienced the “Night of Terror.” We want to make sure the memorial is complete before or in time for the 2020 votes for women centennial that will honor American women voting for 100 years. Think of it. Imagine it. Support it.

COMING SOON: More of the eight audio podcast series called the “Night of Terror.” You’ll get a ring-side seat account about what happened on November 15, 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse as Suffrage Wagon News Channel partners with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in this first annual observance of the “Night of Terror.” We support the building of the suffrage memorial! Join us.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6)

Audio podcast series of the “Night of Terror.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Suffrage centennials are getting a lot of play…

"Night of Terror" podcasts on Suffrage Wagon News ChannelSuffrage centennials are getting a lot of play these days. There’s special programming on WAMC Albany, NY today about the upcoming election called “Susan B. Anthony Voted. Did you?” And the upcoming “Night of Terror” podcasts to commemorate November 15th are in the works. Stay tuned! Both events above have the 2020 suffrage centennial celebration in mind.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series in the event you missed any of the episodes: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party to picket the White House followed by prison time in 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

The audio series “Playing Politics with the President” is the background context to the upcoming “Night of Terror” audio podcasts. The audio podcasts are from Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920 book. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West and others.

FacebookCOMING SOON: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Please join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

New “Wonder Woman” Book, plus video, & final podcast for “Playing Politics with the President”

Wonder Woman bookThe Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore is out. I haven’t had a chance to order the book yet. The advance publicity says  the text makes a connection between Wonder Woman’s creator and the impact the suffrage movement had on him.

Today’s the last day of audio podcasts for “Playing Politics with the President.” My, you’ve been patient. Over the next few weeks we’ll be hearing the “Night of Terror” — a turning point in the suffrage movement in 1917 following the arrests at the White House and imprisonment at the Occoquan Workhouse. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is holding its first annual “Night of Terror” observance from November 1 through the 15th as a fundraising event. Stay tuned!

VIDEO REMINDER: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter will be published soon. Make sure you’re subscribed. Issues are published in the summer, fall, winter, and spring.

PODCAST #9: “Playing Politics with the President.” Summary: As the activists of the National Woman’s Party ran out of options, Alice Paul and others shifted their sights to making suffrage a political issue and organizing the women voters of the Western states that won the franchise earlier than the rest of the nation. A comparison to the English suffrage movement is included in this final podcast of the series. The story is from Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House and prison time in 1917.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon with email, on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Heat up the oven: Video and Podcast #8 of “Playing Politics with the President”

Cooking Challenge

Who was the better cook? The woman who believed in voting? Or the woman who opposed the idea? This may sound outlandish to us today, but the thought wasn’t so peculiar back when the “suffs” challenged the “antis” to a cooking contest. See the great article from the archives.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOT VIDEO: Make scones in your kitchen with Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. Gather your friends and family members around and pull some fresh traditional English scones out of the oven to serve with hot beverages.

Podcast #8: “Playing Politics with the President.” Summary: Some people fold up in the face of opposition. For many suffragists, however, many became even more determined. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson had plenty of opportunities to come to terms with the issue of women voting. The activists sent deputation after deputation to visit Wilson. Repeatedly he told them he had more important business on his mind. It could have been easy, but Wilson chose the difficult route.

More than 60 years had passed since the 1848 Seneca Falls women’s rights convention. Enough already, said the National Woman’s Party. From this point on, suffrage becomes a difficult political issue. And coming soon: The story of the White House suffrage pickets, the “Silent Sentinels.” We’re getting closer to the end of this podcast series: “Playing Politics with the President.” Only one more podcast in this series. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. From Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920.

Here’s the “Playing Politics with the President” series so far: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House and prison time.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon with email, on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Marguerite’s Musings and Podcast #7, “Playing Politics with the President”

Marguerite's Musings

I’m delighted to announce that my cousin Rosalie Morales Kearns has launched a new press in Albany, New York specializing in women’s writings:

Shade Mountain Press. The first title, Egg Heaven, has been favorably reviewed in Booklist and Foreword Reviews. This is terrific news! I’ve been curled up in the outside hammock reading Egg Heaven during the late afternoon over the past few days.

PODCAST #7: “Playing Politics with the President.” We’re getting close to the end of the audio podcast series. Here’s the series so far: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7 of the nine-audio podcast series about Woodrow Wilson and the suffrage movement. The audio podcasts are produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. From Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920.

A LAST MINUTE REMINDER: VISIT SENECA FALLS, NY:

Edna on a horseYour last chance to see the colorful countryside before all the gold and red leaves are on the ground and cold weather has set in. This past weekend Seneca Falls hosted people attending the Seneca Falls Dialogues. And don’t forget that special programs are ongoing at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park as well as exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. Also, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s birthday is coming up in November.

The Richard P. Hunt papers are open to the public at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park for the purpose of research. It’s a special event celebrating Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. The Hunt House in Waterloo isn’t far from Seneca Falls. The Hunt papers include a thousand separate items dating from 1828 to 1856. Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls. A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf. Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers.

All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about upcoming programs.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Podcast #6: “Playing Politics with the President”

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Audio Podcast #6: In the story background of this audio series, many suffrage activists played a waiting game with U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. First, they decided to use each and every opportunity to work through the political system. Once everything else has been tried with no substantial results, they understood the necessity to move to another level.

This audio podcast gives the overview and background which means you’ll have to be patient sitting through a two-minute explanation of the view that persistence and determination will pay off… eventually. The tale is from real life. A waiting game. No car chases. Just the nuts and bolts of what it took over time for women to win the vote in the United States. Listen to this sixth podcast in the series about the long campaign in “Playing Politics with the President.”

The piece starts out by discussing the suffrage association’s annual budget spent on lobbying for an amendment to the Constitution in the context of suffragist Alice Paul’s leadership and organizing. If this is the first time you’ve checked into this audio series, you might be scratching your head and wondering what this is all about. The story: suffrage movement strategy is shifting from a state to a national strategy to win the vote. Soon in the chronology they’ll be considering a bolder and more direct approach. There are some nuggets of factual gold to be found in this descriptive swamp of Washington, DC politics.

SUMMARY SO FAR: “Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6 of the nine-audio podcast series. The content is from Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom, 1921. Audio production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

VIDEO COMING SOON: Traditional English scones from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. It’s a great idea when planning your next social gathering or fundraiser to invite friends, family, or for your organization.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Podcast #2: “Playing Politics with the President”

Woodrow WilsonThis second audio podcast of “Playing Politics with the President” is a provocative look at the determination of women to press the issue of their rights in 1913. I love the description of the first deputation to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson –and then the second and the third. We’re not hearing this account from people a hundred years after the fact. We’re fortunate to be able to  hear Doris Steven’s own words published in 1920 in “Jailed for Freedom.”

Podcast #2. “Playing Politics with the President”

I loved the description of the womens’ reaction to being led into President Wilson’s office and being asked to sit in rows of chairs, like a school room, with the Woodrow Wilson’s chair in front. Everyone in the women’s delegation admitted to being frightened by the formality. And Alice Paul’s questioning of the President is classic. No one would accept Wilson’s excuses. The women’s reactions are enough to bring a smile of support to our faces today. Essentially he told the women of the delegation that he had more important things to do besides caring about their rights. After suffragists gathered petitions from around the nation, they presented them to Congress and the Susan B. Anthony amendment was introduced, but the battle wasn’t over yet.

This audio podcast series is great if you have two minutes to get a sense of what it took for American women to win the vote. Last week we featured Podcast #1. Take some time each weekend to relax to listen and add to your awareness of the continuing drama of “Playing Politics with the President.” We’ll be sharing a new audio podcast in the series every weekend. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivix.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

Find out about the Seneca Falls Dialogues in Seneca Falls, NY in October at LetsRockTheCradle.com Registrations are possible now. Fall is a great time to travel. Imagine the colorful landscape and all that you can see in the vicinity of Seneca Falls, New York. Also, check with LetsRockTheCradle.com for other travel ideas when you’re in the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States.