Tag Archives: women’s suffrage

Women’s suffrage storytelling is expanded with audio podcasts!

Goal of 200 storytelling videos about women’s suffrage movement makes learning American history easy for young people on Vimeo.

THREE AUDIO PODCAST SERIES THAT SHOW THE U.S. SUFFRAGE ACTIVISTS FOR THE COMPLEX AND PERSISTENT INDIVIDUALS THEY WERE:

(1.) “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7.

(2.) “Playing Politics with the President.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Podcast #8. Podcast #9.

(3.) “The Night of Terror.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Podcast #8.

Videos keep people coming back to see what’s new on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Highlights of some of the personal videos about Edna Kearns and family. We’re adding new videos often. AND TAKE NOTE OF OUR EXPANDING COLLECTION OF AUDIO PODCASTS!

Reminder to vote from Suffrage WagonFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blogMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Honor the grandmothers in the kitchen!

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Honor the grandmothers in the kitchen! on Vimeo.

The year 2016 is an election year –more reason than ever to remember the grandmothers and great grandmothers who spent more than 72 years working to win voting rights for women.

When you visit Suffrage Wagon Cooking School you’ll see a representative sampling of the cooking demonstrations during 2015, plus an archive. Chef Marguerite is your host.

Chef MargueriteFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is closed during January 2016. Programming resumes in February. Your host: Marguerite Kearns.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. Suffrage Wagon is a partner in the Inez Milholland Centennial observance in 2016. Inez Milholland is America’s suffrage martyr.

Happy Thanksgiving with Suffrage Movement News Notes

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Women’s Suffrage Holiday News Notes on Vimeo.

Happy Thanksgiving from Marguerite Kearns and Suffrage Wagon News Channel with this video of news notes! It’s an overview of the postings we’ve been featuring during November 2015.

The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling is in its first season. Follow the adventures of Bess, Edna, and Wilmer.

At Suffrage Wagon Cooking School we’ll be cooking for the holidays. Check out the cooking school programs for 2015.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is openFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

The Buzz about “10 Days in a Madhouse”: Featured program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe

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“10 Days in a Madhouse” film opens in November 2015 on Vimeo.

by Marguerite Kearns

Welcome to Suffrage Wagon Cafe. I had the pleasure recently of interviewing Susan Goforth and Timothy Hines. Susan is the producer and her husband Timothy Hines, the director of “10 Days in a Madhouse.” The film featuring investigative reporter Nellie Bly and starring Caroline Barry, Christopher Lambert, Kelly LeBrock and others. It’s available in US theaters staring this week in a staggered release across the nation (Pandragon Films).

The production is based on Nellie Bly’s actual undercover investigative reporting on Blackwell’s Island, a mental hospital before the turn of the 20th century. It’s an important film, the type of production that’s in short supply these days –a work about women who are more than secondary characters, but rather pivotal individuals who move the plot forward.

THE U.S. FILM THAT TRANSFORMED THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT!

"10 Days in a Madhouse" film“10 Days in a Madhouse” producer Susan Goforth had this to say when we first corresponded about the film in production: “I’m sure there are many women out there inspired by Nellie Bly as you and I. More than ever, we need a positive female role model for the upcoming year. It’s my privilege to serve in the making of this movie, a movie far greater than the sum of its parts, a movie that has already transformed the lives of the hundreds of people who helped make it. Surely Nellie Bly’s spirit has been involved in making this amazing film!”

I read the Nellie Bly biography by Brooke Kroeger and found it a fascinating account of her life. That’s when I found out many more details about Nellie, including her press coverage of the U.S. women’s rights movement. Nellie’s interview with Susan B. Anthony opened people’s eyes across the nation about this icon as a private person as well as her dedication as a women’s rights activist over decades. Nellie also covered the 1913 big suffrage parade in Washington, DC. She spoke her mind and attracted attention and scrutiny about a wide variety of issues. This film is opening doors to an understanding of women in the past who have made a difference.

NELLIE BLY AS A SUFFRAGE ACTIVIST AND MUCH MORE

Librivox, Nellie BlyBut “10 Days in a Madhouse” isn’t about Nellie as a suffrage activist. That’s background. The film expands our understanding of Nellie’s undercover journalistic coverage that opened the door for change in funding and policy making for publicly-funded institutions. It’s shocking. It’s informative. And the film is a must see.

The film stays true to Nellie’s journalistic accomplishments in a production that’s expected to be in the spotlight during the Academy awards in 2016. You can see it now. The production features 90% women. It’s a valuable tool for teaching and learning about Nellie Bly and her cutting-edge work in investigative journalism.

Listen to Nellie’s own words in the entire print coverage of “10 Days in a Madhouse” on Librivox. The Suffrage Wagon News Channel edited version is shorter (about four minutes). Stretch out with the audio before you see the film. More coming soon about “10 Days in a Madhouse.”

SuffragetteWhile you’re planning for a night out on the town, add the film “Suffragette” to your list. Susan Goforth and Timothy Hines believe the two films together will have people talking and thinking for quite a while. Support women filmmakers, performers, directors, producers, and production staff. We’re about to witness change when it comes to women in the entertainment industry. Support what’s on its way and demonstrate that we want more!

Cup of coffeeThank you for stopping by Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Videos: Wrapping up our first year at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School!

Suffrage Wagon Cooking SchoolOur first year at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School is coming to an end. This is the last day for visiting the farmers’ market where, over time, the refrigerator’s produce bin has been crammed with food fresh from the fields. We love to cook with fresh local ingredients!

Our Irish wood-burning cook stove has been a hit with cooking school students and fans. During 2015 we’ve baked apple pie in it, as well as butternut squash soup.

A demonstration on how to make French onion soup is coming soon from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. Keep your produce bin stocked with fresh onions. They come in handy when you’re in a hurry and a pot of fresh soup is all that you can manage for dinner.

VIDEOS: Highlights of cooking school demonstrations for 2015. If you didn’t have a chance to attend our birthday party celebration on video, here’s your opportunity now.

Here’s what we crammed into the shopping bag during our last visit to the farmers’ market. Check in with this video now:

More fresh produce from the Farmers’ Market! on Vimeo.

Cooking School posterMeet our cooking school students and check out our vintage Irish wood-burning stove. Relax this fall by following Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on Vimeo.

In your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Episode #5: Bess and Edna argued at the teahouse!

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Episode #5. Bess and Edna argue about marriage and other things on Vimeo.

Bess and Edna may have been the best of friends, but often they didn’t agree. Edna read Mary Wollstonecraft’s classic work, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman because Bess insisted. And Edna agreed that when women were treated like second-class citizens, they made compromises and often acted strange out of confusion or just simple survival.

Bess shocked her friends when she told them to be careful about not becoming a “servile parasite.” That’s the term  Mary Wollstonecraft used in her book. Bess said it made her think twice about accepting the way things were. This was tempting to do, Bess insisted. Young women had a choice. To live within the cage society carved out for young women. Or step out of expected roles and face the obstacles facing all those who decided to be free.

For Bess, reading Mary Wollstonecraft only reinforced her determination to consider living the single life. Women wanted freedom, Wollstonecraft wrote, but this freedom had been “bartered for splendid slavery.” Many people considered Mary Wollstonecraft the mother of the women’s rights movement. The words of Mary Wollstonecraft  reached the ears of Bess about how Lucretia Mott kept Wollstonecraft’s Vindication handy in a central location at her Philadelphia home. Mary may have lived in a different time and across the ocean, but her words resonated with Bess and many others her age.

LUCRETIA MOTT LOVED THE BOOK BY MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

Lucretia Mott had been a legend in Philadelphia because of her involvement in the Seneca Falls, NY women’s rights conference in 1848. People said that Lucretia could quote entire passages from Mary Wollstonecraft. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman made such an impression on Lucretia Mott that she urged her friends to read it, especially Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Mott was married, which in Edna’s mind suggested the possibility of making marriage work for a modern woman of the early 20th century. If someone’s husband believed in equality and equal rights, marriage wouldn’t turn into a prison. But Edna never imagined finding a man who could change her mind about remaining single until she met Wilmer Kearns.

RESOURCES: You can listen to both books by Mary Wollstonecraft on Librivox, free. Mary: A Fiction and A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.

ACTION: Help support a statue of Mary Wollstonecraft in England. Despite the significance of Mary Wollstonecraft’s life and work, she has no monument. The Mary on the Green campaign believes that a monument to Mary Wollstonecraft would stimulate questions, establish her place in history, and trigger investigation into her impact on history. Newington Green, London, is where Mary lived, and where her radical ideas on equality, education and politics were first formed. A dedicated group of Mary Wollstonecraft enthusiasts and  supporters are raising funds to commission a monument in England. Find out more. 

Mary Wollstonecraft
Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

Episode #4: The book that got Bess in trouble with her parents at home

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Episode #4: How Bess got in trouble for reading Mary Wollstonecraft! on Vimeo.

The problems for Bess started when her parents discovered a forbidden book under her bedroom mattress. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft (1792) started Bess on the path of finding other books that presented the idea that women and men could be equal. But to find support, Bess had to raid the school and public library. Before long, Bess had shared Mary Wollstonecraft with all her friends.

Mary Wollstonecraft

Edna’s friend, Bess, had been the little girl who got her dress dirty climbing an apple tree to pick fruit for Edna back when they were young and spent hours playing with a rose china tea set and pretending to be mothers of their dolls.

Bessie and Edna shared oolong tea, served with scones and lemon marmalade, while practicing how to hold dainty teacups and make polite conversation. Bessie’s lilting musical voice and a clear complexion summed up Bess and her childhood joyful innocence. Abolitionist and women’s rights activist Lucretia Mott’s made it known that oolong was her favorite tea. Bess and Edna wouldn’t drink anything else.

BESS TRIED TO BE LIKE THE OTHER GIRLS BUT THAT CHANGED AFTER READING A NOVEL BY MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

The story of Bess and several other young girls on Rubicam Avenue in Germantown appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1897 after they’d raised money for city children to leave crowded neighborhoods for summer excursions. The total of $200 collected for the Children’s Country Week Association wasn’t as important as having the names of Bess and her girlfriends mentioned in the society column. Edna’s mother, May Begley Buckman, wasn’t impressed. She said it wouldn’t be long before Bess and her friends would be raising money for hospitals after they’d landed husbands and waited for the birth of their first child. “Bess isn’t that way,” Edna insisted, but she didn’t tell her mother why she could be so certain.

Mary WollstonecraftEdna’s commitment to avoid marriage solidified after reading the 1788 novel by writer Mary Wollstonecraft: Mary: A Fiction. Bessie had wrapped the controversial book in newspaper and slipped it to Edna at Friends’ Central school and then returned it to the public library after Edna read it from cover to cover. Unlike Jane Eyre in the Brontë novel who delayed marriage and then later found happiness with Mr. Rochester, the fictional Mary in the Wollstonecraft novel had romantic attractions to both a man and a woman.

WHAT IT MEANT TO BE A “NEW WOMAN” IN 1900

Mary Wollstonecrafts’s character of Mary in her novel represented a New Woman who thought for herself. She didn’t ground her future in marriage and viewed the institution as guaranteed to ruin the spirit and independence of every young woman seeking her rightful place in the world. Edna had been convinced that no young man could change her mind about marriage, that is, until she met Wilmer Kearns.

Follow the entire “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling series.

TeaParty2Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.