Tag Archives: suffragists

100 Years Ago: What was Edna Kearns thinking about? Going to the ball!

2015 is the centennial of the 1915 New York State suffrage centennial on Vimeo.

PART OF SUFFRAGE WAGON’S SPECIAL NYS’S SPECIAL SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL COVERAGE:

1915 special feature

Edna Kearns: 100 years ago

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate suffrage centennials and women’s freedom to vote. And follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. Check out Suffrage Wagon’s video channels on Vimeo and YouTube.

What was suffragist Edna Kearns concerned about 100 years ago? Suffrage films!

Edna Kearns: 100 years agoby Marguerite Kearns, History Communicator*

New York State suffragist Edna Kearns was no slouch. Her correspondence shows this clearly. One hundred years ago New York State suffrage activists were poised on the cusp of a year-long campaign to win a referendum. New York wasn’t alone. Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Massachusetts women were also up against the challenges before them. And an enormous amount of effort was poured into these state campaigns. Although the prospect of votes for women in these four states were defeated, the national momentum toward victory in 1920 with the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was well  underway.

This letter sent to suffragist Edna Kearns in January 1915 shows that activists on the community level freely communicated their needs and challenges with each other. In this letter,  one activist reached out to Edna Kearns to pick her brains about the use of film to bring women out of their homes and introduce them to the idea of woman suffrage. What a concept!

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF FILM IN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS LIKE SUFFRAGE

Film is an especially important medium today. Check out Suffrage Wagon’s “Crash Course on Suffrage Film” that features film and video selections from today and yesterday, all of them extremely important in introducing the public to the suffrage movement, here and abroad.

Are you up to date about the upcoming film, “Suffragette,” from the UK that’s expected to be released in September 2015? The BBC suffrage movement sit com is in its second season. Watch the trailer. And books continue streaming out of the UK, in particular the recently-released work on English suffragette, Princess Sophia. This book by UK broadcast journalist Anita Anand is especially interesting because of its six-figure advance.

FacebookEDITORIAL NOTE:

The asterisk above next to the byline refers to the link to an appeal for people to step forward as “History Communicators.” Take a close look at a passion many of us already share.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate suffrage centennials and women’s freedom to vote. And follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. Check out Suffrage Wagon’s video channels on Vimeo and YouTube.

Happy birthday video & audio podcast: “You are There” program in 1853

Happy 5th Birthday, Suffrage Wagon News Channel from Marguerite Kearns on Vimeo. Yes, five years of plugging along with this web site is something to brag about, or perhaps weep. In any event, it’s time to celebrate. Have fun with the birthday jingle and then…

Tune into an audio program about a suffrage convention in 1853. Be the first on your block to say you were there.

Congratulations! The National Women’s History Project will be in its 35th year in 2015. “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives” is the theme for National Women’s History Month 2015. The theme presents the opportunity to weave women’s stories – individually and collectively – into the essential fabric of our nation’s history. Join the National Women’s History Project. We’re members.  Visit the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial and follow the effort to complete a suffragist memorial on or before 2020, the votes for women centennial.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog to register your views and observations. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Day #13, Last day of the “Night of Terror” audio podcast series!

by Marguerite Kearns

Day #13. Here is Podcast #8 of the audio series, the “Night of Terror.” Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West. From Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920.

The entire “Night of Terror” audio podcast series. I’ve been blogging continuously for a total of twelve days now in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association. And now we’ve come to Podcast #8 of the “Night of Terror” audio series. It’s the last podcast in the series.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9), Day #10 , (Nov. 10), Day #11,  (Nov. 11), Day #12 (Nov. 12).

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Marguerite’s Musings on Day #10 of the “Night of Terror,” plus Podcast #5 and video

Marguerite's Musings with Marguerite Kearnsby Marguerite Kearns

Day #10 and Podcast #5. More alarming reports reached the outside from Lucy Burns about the “Night of Terror,” –messages written on small scraps of paper. Follow the continuing story on Podcast #5 of the  audio series. Nothing pretty. First-person accounts. Being held down and force fed. Not easy to know about, but essential in terms of understanding the Big Picture and its significance.

The publicity associated with the “Night of Terror” resulted in a “turning point” in the national suffrage movement. Suffrage Wagon’s partner, Turning Point Suffragist Memorial, doesn’t have that name by accident. The federal government couldn’t stand the publicity in 1917, especially after the U.S. entered World War I. And it must have been particularly difficult because of the split within the larger suffrage movement. The antis, or those who were against women voting, shifted a large part of their effort to supporting the war.

Suffrage Wagon supports suffragist memorial

And many suffragists, including members of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, announced that they could work for woman’s suffrage, as well as support the war. A New York Times article on August 31, 1917, “State Suffragists Condemn Picketing,” is a case in point. At its Saratoga, NY conference, the Woman Suffrage Party denounced the women picketing the White House. Imagine yourself in 1917, hearing about the brave women at the White House gates and still others at the Occoquan Workhouse and the controversy swirls around you, daily. Only now do we realize that the bold actions of these women became the “turning point” for the movement.

The audio podcasts provide an intimate view of activists in the last stages of the national Votes for Women or suffrage movement. The audio by Librivox and its team of volunteers is memorable. These first-person accounts are from Doris Stevens in her book “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920.

I’ve been blogging for nine days now in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

Here’s Podcast #5 of the audio series, the “Night of Terror.” Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West.

Let’s get behind Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in funding and building a memorial to the brave women who picketed the White House and experienced the “Night of Terror.” Make sure the memorial is complete before or in time for the 2020 votes for women centennial that will honor American women voting for 100 years. Think of it. Imagine it. Support it.

LibriVox is a terrific resource and one that educates and inspires. How appropriate. LibriVox is run by volunteers, and we’re honoring activists who volunteered for a tour of duty at the White House gates. We’ve edited the LibriVox recordings and made them short and sweet to fit your busy lifestyle.

COMING SOON: The final three episodes of the audio podcast series called the “Night of Terror.” You’ll get a ring-side seat account about what happened on at the Occoquan Workhouse and the aftermath. We support the building of the suffrage memorial! Join us.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9).

Audio podcast series of the “Night of Terror.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3.  Podcast #4. Podcast #5.

A video about the suffrage movement.

Join me in supporting  Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in its campaign to fund and build a memorial to the brave women who picketed the White House and experienced the “Night of Terror.” Think of it. Imagine it. Support the suffragist memorial.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Day #6 and Audio Podcast #1 of the “Night of Terror”

"Marguerite's Musings" by Marguerite Kearnsby Marguerite Kearns

Day #6. I’ve been blogging for five days now in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

We have the basics complete at this point. It’s clear that women became impatient after working continuously from 1848 to 1917. They were annoyed with the slow process. They hated being ignored. So they upped the ante by picketing the White House during the administration of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson starting in January of 1917 through the next year. Even with arrests, by November of 1917 the top federal government officials were impatient with the picketing. The “Night of Terror” resulted.

Here is Podcast #1 of the audio series, the “Night of Terror.” Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West. From Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920.

COMING SOON: More of the eight audio podcast series called the “Night of Terror.” You’ll get a ring-side seat account about what happened on November 15, 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse as Suffrage Wagon News Channel partners with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in this first annual observance of the “Night of Terror.” We support the building of the suffrage memorial! Join us.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5).

Audio podcast series of the “Night of Terror.” Podcast #1.

Let’s get behind Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in funding and building a memorial to the brave women who picketed the White House and experienced the “Night of Terror.” We want to make sure the memorial is complete before or in time for the 2020 votes for women centennial that will honor American women voting for 100 years. Think of it. Imagine it. Support it.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

On Day #4, ELECTION DAY, fire up the oven for hot treats!

Vote graphic on Suffrage Wagon Nes Channelby Marguerite Kearns

The picketing of the White House started in January of 1917 and went on for over a year. Standing in front of the White House gates with a picket sign was no walk in the park. So, a cup of hot tea and some goodies must have sounded terrific at the end of the day.

This is why a visit to Suffrage Wagon Cooking School is a perfect way to honor Election Day and the November 15th observance.  Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is the “go to” place if you’re on a college or university campus and would like to host a fundraiser for the Occoquan Workhouse suffragist prisoners’ memorial. And you can quickly put together a fundraiser at home with a little determination and a recipe for traditional English scones.

This is my fourth day blogging in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership between Suffrage Wagon News Channel and Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association. Turning Point has a web site and blog. You can also follow on Twitter and Facebook. There’s a great deal of activity going on at Suffrage Wagon and Turning Point these days. The goal? To fund and complete a memorial to the brave women who faced the “Night of Terror” November 14-15, 1917.

And now the fun part: Let’s cook up a storm with a fundraiser for the memorial right in your own home or school, organization, or college campus. Video about how to make traditional English scones for a fundraiser.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking School‘s video guides you through making traditional English scones like suffrage activists used to make. Hot tea and goodies must have been welcome treats after a long day out in the streets speaking from soapboxes or picketing the White House.

Baking scones is part of the two-week observance of November 15th this year when Suffrage Wagon News Channel partners with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial. It isn’t easy raising money to build a memorial to the brave women who picketed the White House in 1917 and then were held at the Occoquan Workhouse near Washington, DC to experience the “Night of Terror.” That’s why we love having you along for the ride. Find out how you can host a fundraiser with friends and family. Contribute to and support the proposed suffragist memorial with the goal of it being completed before or in time for the 2020 votes for women centennial celebration.

Carry the vision of a suffragist memorial forward. These events and celebrations are part of the previews of suffrage centennial observances now and in the future. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for updates about suffrage centennials. If you’re planning a centennial event, let SuffrageCentennials know about it.

Suffrage Wagon News Channel is a multi-media platform for news and stories of the suffrage movement that has been publishing since 2009. Follow the Suffrage Wagon. December 2014 is Suffrage Wagon’s fifth birthday. Suffrage Wagon News Channel is inspired by the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon used by suffrage activist Edna Kearns in New York City and on Long Island.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3).

LINKS: “Why I vote and support a suffragist memorial”: Marguerite’s Musings.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.