Tag Archives: Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

Get ready for “Suffragette” film from the UK during Women’s History Month!

VIDEO: Get ready for the release in 2015 of “Suffragette” film from the UK by visiting Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. Women’s History Month is a perfect time to host a special occasion for friends, family, or your organization.

NEWS ROUNDUP: New York State’s gearing up for its 2017 suffrage centennial. The National Women’s History Project is celebrating its 35th birthday with a party in March. Suffrage movement icon Joan of Arc now has her own museum in France. Big festivities in Rochester, New York for Susan B. Anthony’s 195th birthday. New and excellent suffrage educational materials released. Second season for “Up the Women,” the suffrage sit com in the UK.

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What was suffragist Edna Kearns concerned about 100 years ago? Suffrage films!

Edna Kearns: 100 years agoby Marguerite Kearns, History Communicator*

New York State suffragist Edna Kearns was no slouch. Her correspondence shows this clearly. One hundred years ago New York State suffrage activists were poised on the cusp of a year-long campaign to win a referendum. New York wasn’t alone. Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Massachusetts women were also up against the challenges before them. And an enormous amount of effort was poured into these state campaigns. Although the prospect of votes for women in these four states were defeated, the national momentum toward victory in 1920 with the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was well  underway.

This letter sent to suffragist Edna Kearns in January 1915 shows that activists on the community level freely communicated their needs and challenges with each other. In this letter,  one activist reached out to Edna Kearns to pick her brains about the use of film to bring women out of their homes and introduce them to the idea of woman suffrage. What a concept!

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF FILM IN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS LIKE SUFFRAGE

Film is an especially important medium today. Check out Suffrage Wagon’s “Crash Course on Suffrage Film” that features film and video selections from today and yesterday, all of them extremely important in introducing the public to the suffrage movement, here and abroad.

Are you up to date about the upcoming film, “Suffragette,” from the UK that’s expected to be released in September 2015? The BBC suffrage movement sit com is in its second season. Watch the trailer. And books continue streaming out of the UK, in particular the recently-released work on English suffragette, Princess Sophia. This book by UK broadcast journalist Anita Anand is especially interesting because of its six-figure advance.

FacebookEDITORIAL NOTE:

The asterisk above next to the byline refers to the link to an appeal for people to step forward as “History Communicators.” Take a close look at a passion many of us already share.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate suffrage centennials and women’s freedom to vote. And follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. Check out Suffrage Wagon’s video channels on Vimeo and YouTube.

The long-awaited Chinese fortune cookie demonstration: From Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

Make Chinese fortune cookies at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

Make Chinese Fortune Cookies at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Vimeo. Give yourself enough time and space to make and serve traditional Chinese fortune cookies for 2015’s Chinese New Year! Make every suffrage movement celebration memorable!

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate suffrage centennials and women’s freedom to vote. And follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

VIDEO: A New Year’s Resolution– To make Chinese fortune cookies for the Chinese New Year!

Chinese fortune cookies for the Chinese New Year is a Vimeo video.

New Year’s Eve came and went but not without a resolution to make traditional fortune cookies for the upcoming Chinese New Year in February. That’s why it’s time to put the Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on your calendar to visit for the next demonstration. Create cute containers for fortunes you can write yourself with custom suffrage movement messages to surprise your guests. This video promo gets you in the mood and the demonstration is in the pipeline. The fortune cookie demonstration from Suffrage Wagon News Channel is coming soon.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate suffrage centennials and women’s freedom to vote.

January birthdays: Lucretia Mott, Alice Paul, Carrie Chapman Catt, Caroline Severance, and others! Two videos: Cook and celebrate.

Celebrate with a Vimeo video about January birthdays.

I love birthday parties! And January has had enough birthday celebrations to justify digging the traditional English scones demonstration out of the files of Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. January features the birthdays of Lucretia Mott, Alice Paul, vintage-canning-labelsCarrie Chapman Catt, and Caroline Severance as well as other women’s rights activists.

I’ve been reading a biography of suffragist Caroline Severance, a terrific work by Virginia Elwood-Akers. More about Caroline as I read again, with pleasure, the story of yet another (relatively unknown) suffrage activist who devoted her life to the cause. She grew up in the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the U.S. (the Finger Lakes) and went on to became a mover and shaker in California. The book is a labor of love. As the author plunged into decades of research, she stumbled on the fact that Caroline knew her great-grandfather in California. And from there, the story of Caroline Severance only gets better.

With even more cold weather on the horizon, the thought of something baking in the oven while brewing a pot of tea sounds great, doesn’t it?  I’ve seen fresh strawberries already in the market recently. Nothing locally grown to be sure, but a treat like scones and strawberries will get special attention from your guests and family members.

This demonstration from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School was reason enough for me to update the page on the news channel. Check into Suffrage Wagon Cooking School for previews of what’s to come in the kitchen.

Here’s the video with the step-by-step instructions, for traditional English scones, custom made with the suffrage movement in mind.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate suffrage centennials and women’s freedom to vote.

A happy Thanksgiving for 2014!

Happy Thanksgiving from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. And we’re looking forward to making Chinese fortune cookies for Chinese New Year!!

Happy ThanksivingFollow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

Happy Thanksgiving!

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog to register your views and observations. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Day #5 of the ‘Night of Terror” observance & the “why” of the White House picketing

Marguerite Kearns at Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

I’m late getting the blog post Day#5 finished, but it’s still 10:54 p.m. where I am. One of my stalwart friends asked me the other day: “But why did the women picket the White House in 1917? Couldn’t they have expressed their point of view in some other way?”

Good question and one that I welcome in this fifth day of partnering with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial to raise awareness of and support for the building of a suffragist memorial to honor those brave women who experienced the “Night of Terror” at the Occoquan Workhouse near Washington, DC in 1917.

When you look at the 1917 picketing from a larger perspective, put yourself back into time. How would you feel as someone in the second generation of women petitioning for the right to vote? Then turn the clock back to 1848 and the women’s convention at Seneca Falls, NY. This wasn’t the first occasion when women decided that enough was enough. But it’s the date when we start counting as far as the suffrage movement is concerned –when there’s no doubt that the nation heard the rumblings from impatient citizens who demanded participation in the public arena. The suffrage movement started in 1848 and concluded in 1920 with the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Keep this in mind: it was touch and go for a great deal of that time.

Think of it. Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and others spent 50 years petitioning for the vote by the turn of the 20th century. This is when my grandmother Edna Kearns and her generation stepped up to the plate and took over from the first wave of activists. By 1917, women had been working themselves into states of exhaustion by continuing to pressure for the right to vote. I’ve written a lot about Grandmother Edna Kearns. Here’s a video where she speaks for herself.

By 1917, my grandmother Edna B. Kearns had been in the suffrage fold for at least a decade. When’s the last time you spent ten years working on a single cause? Did you burn out? Were you even a bit annoyed or frustrated at your lack of progress? When the National Woman’s Party announced the White House picketing in 1917, many activists didn’t hesitate to join. However, others condemned them for taking such a bold action. The “suffrage movement” wasn’t one movement. It existed under an umbrella of women from many backgrounds.

Women joined the picket line from all over the United States. The National Woman’s Party needed people on the front lines who were prepared to go to prison, if necessary. And without the extraordinary support network that stretched across the United States, the campaign wouldn’t have been as effective.

This is Day #5 of blogging to honor the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

COMING SOON: The eight audio podcast series called the “Night of Terror.” You’ll get a ring-side seat account about what happened on November 15, 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4)

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.