Tag Archives: suffrage storytelling

Happy December from Marguerite Kearns & Suffrage Wagon News Channel

Support Suffrage Storytelling during Season I: Drama, action, and fun! on Vimeo.

Happy holidays from “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling. Season I continues with Bess, Wilmer and Edna. Meet Jonathan Geffner, ventriloquist, a special guest on Suffrage Storytelling. We’re up to Episode #9. Watch the videos and catch up with past episodes.

Did you see the Suffrage Wagon News Channel news notes for November? Catch up now!

Women’s Suffrage Holiday News Notes on Vimeo.

COMING SOON: Marguerite Kearns interviews the director and producer of the new film, “10 Days in a Madhouse.” A new program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe on December 8, 2015. A December 25, 2015 birthday celebration for Edna May Buckman. Celebrating the grandmothers at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

At Suffrage Wagon Cooking School we’ll be cooking for the holidays. Check out the cooking school programs for 2015.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking SchoolFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Happy Thanksgiving with Suffrage Movement News Notes

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Women’s Suffrage Holiday News Notes on Vimeo.

Happy Thanksgiving from Marguerite Kearns and Suffrage Wagon News Channel with this video of news notes! It’s an overview of the postings we’ve been featuring during November 2015.

The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling is in its first season. Follow the adventures of Bess, Edna, and Wilmer.

At Suffrage Wagon Cooking School we’ll be cooking for the holidays. Check out the cooking school programs for 2015.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is openFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Episode #4: The book that got Bess in trouble with her parents at home

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

 

 

 

Episode #4: How Bess got in trouble for reading Mary Wollstonecraft! on Vimeo.

The problems for Bess started when her parents discovered a forbidden book under her bedroom mattress. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft (1792) started Bess on the path of finding other books that presented the idea that women and men could be equal. But to find support, Bess had to raid the school and public library. Before long, Bess had shared Mary Wollstonecraft with all her friends.

Mary Wollstonecraft

Edna’s friend, Bess, had been the little girl who got her dress dirty climbing an apple tree to pick fruit for Edna back when they were young and spent hours playing with a rose china tea set and pretending to be mothers of their dolls.

Bessie and Edna shared oolong tea, served with scones and lemon marmalade, while practicing how to hold dainty teacups and make polite conversation. Bessie’s lilting musical voice and a clear complexion summed up Bess and her childhood joyful innocence. Abolitionist and women’s rights activist Lucretia Mott’s made it known that oolong was her favorite tea. Bess and Edna wouldn’t drink anything else.

BESS TRIED TO BE LIKE THE OTHER GIRLS BUT THAT CHANGED AFTER READING A NOVEL BY MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

The story of Bess and several other young girls on Rubicam Avenue in Germantown appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer in 1897 after they’d raised money for city children to leave crowded neighborhoods for summer excursions. The total of $200 collected for the Children’s Country Week Association wasn’t as important as having the names of Bess and her girlfriends mentioned in the society column. Edna’s mother, May Begley Buckman, wasn’t impressed. She said it wouldn’t be long before Bess and her friends would be raising money for hospitals after they’d landed husbands and waited for the birth of their first child. “Bess isn’t that way,” Edna insisted, but she didn’t tell her mother why she could be so certain.

Mary WollstonecraftEdna’s commitment to avoid marriage solidified after reading the 1788 novel by writer Mary Wollstonecraft: Mary: A Fiction. Bessie had wrapped the controversial book in newspaper and slipped it to Edna at Friends’ Central school and then returned it to the public library after Edna read it from cover to cover. Unlike Jane Eyre in the Brontë novel who delayed marriage and then later found happiness with Mr. Rochester, the fictional Mary in the Wollstonecraft novel had romantic attractions to both a man and a woman.

WHAT IT MEANT TO BE A “NEW WOMAN” IN 1900

Mary Wollstonecrafts’s character of Mary in her novel represented a New Woman who thought for herself. She didn’t ground her future in marriage and viewed the institution as guaranteed to ruin the spirit and independence of every young woman seeking her rightful place in the world. Edna had been convinced that no young man could change her mind about marriage, that is, until she met Wilmer Kearns.

Follow the entire “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling series.

TeaParty2Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

More from Bess on “Suffrage Storytelling,” plus news notes!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Being an Independent Woman in 1903 wasn’t easy! Find out more on “Suffrage Storytelling” on Vimeo.

COMING SOON: We’ll meet Wilmer Kearns who starts complicating young Edna’s life because she wanted to go slowly out into the world and not get tangled in a romance, at least not right away.

“SUFFRAGE STORYTELLING” so far: Episode #1  Episode #2

IN OTHER NEWS: The “10 Days in a Madhouse” movie release date has been pushed back to November 20, 2015 to position for The Golden Globe Awards and The Academy Awards. Based on investigative reporter Nellie Bly’s undercover exposé, the film follows Bly as she feigns insanity in order to be committed into Blackwell’s Island Insane Asylum before the turn of the 20th century.

Nellie Bly was in the front lines of women reporters entering a world that had been dominated by men. Bly covered the 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, DC and supported the women’s suffrage movement. She was a trailblazer in the world of journalism. “10 Days In A Madhouse is directed by Timothy Hines (War of Worlds the True Story), and it is produced by Susan Goforth.

Did you miss the special program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe about August 26th and the 95th anniversary of the 19th Amendment? Stop by and catch up with the cafe programs that were launched in March of 2015.

PARTY SCHEDULED: Suffrage Wagon Cooking School is celebrating its first birthday this summer and fall. Watch for special features.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking SchoolFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo.

Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

The book that got Bess in trouble: Women’s suffrage storytelling special!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Suffrage Storytelling is how we reach women voters, young voters, teachers, students & American history fans! on Vimeo.

SUFFRAGE WAGON CAFE PROGRAM on Suffrage Storytelling by Marguerite Kearns, your cafe host.

On the street where Edna grew up in Philadelphia, her best friend Bess became an outsider compared to most of the other young women interested in marriage and starting a family at the turn of the 20th century. Bess insisted on remaining single because of the limited rights for married women. This caused considerable distress for Bess because she loved men and romance and fashionable dresses. But Bess drew the line in terms of what she’d have to sacrifice in terms of her freedom. And so in her mid teens Bess announced to family and friends that although she invited love and romance into her life, she drew the line at marriage.

MR. WEISS WANTED HIS DAUGHTER BESS TO CHOOSE MARRIAGE, NOT FREEDOM

In the larger world, Bess wasn’t alone. Many young women like Bess longed for choices and opportunities. Increasing numbers of them, like Bess, were in a position to receive an education paid for by their fathers. Mr. Weiss wanted his daughter to be the best possible wife for a man. This included becoming a clever conversationalist, someone skilled in household management, music and art –all of the skills and opportunities that could be acquired with a proper education. And so at home, Mr. Weiss caved into pressure from his wife and daughter for Bess to attend high school, an opportunity denied to most young women of that generation.

BESS RAIDED THE PUBLIC LIBRARY SHELVES FOR BOOKS BY WOMEN WRITERS

Suffrage Storytelling features tale about how Bess got in trouble with her parents! on Vimeo.

When Bess attended high school with her best friend Edna, Bess raided the public library shelves and borrowed books from teachers. She read radical women writers such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Margaret Fuller. Bess also heard stories about Lucretia Mott who turned the heads of old Philadelphia fogies with her radical abolitionist organizing. Many men quaked in their boots when hearing about the ways in which Lucretia Mott and her husband James Mott practiced equality in their marriage relationship. The word got around about how James played an essential role at the 1848 women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York.

YOUNG WOMEN LIKE BESS WANTED TO LIVE A FULL LIFE & THIS GOT BESS IN TROUBLE

Young women like Bess traveled to New York City to witness for themselves the outrageous bells of Greenwich Village who strutted and pranced and showed off their liberated views about women’s equality and freedom. To her father’s dismay and regret, Bess turned out to be exactly what her father despised: an independent thinker, someone committed to remaining single and spending all her free time looking for cracks in the family’s armored existence. All of this came to a head when Mrs. Weiss found the book, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft under Bess’ mattress in her bedroom.

WHAT HAPPENED WHEN WILMER KEARNS ENTERED THE PICTURE . . .

Young Edna Buckman followed in the footsteps of her best friend Bess and announced her intention not to marry. But this resolve was eroded when she met Wilmer Kearns at an art exhibit in Philadelphia. We’ll find out about how this disagreement about marriage impacted the friendship of Bess and Edna on “Suffrage Storytelling.” The ideas of Mary Wollstonecraft and other women writers weren’t taught in school during my youth. Today I find it fascinating to discover the impact they had on my grandmother Edna and other young women like Bess, as well as the previous generation of Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and many others.

COMING SOON: THE BOOK THAT GOT BESS IN DEEP TROUBLE WITH HER PARENTS. You’ll be able to experience the book yourself on audio.
SuffrageWagonCafeMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.