Tag Archives: suffrage movement

News Notes include Woodstock, NY exhibit of women artists & People’s Town Hall in NYC

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Equality Celebrations and Women’s Suffrage News Notes on Vimeo.

It’s the countdown for August 26th, Women’s Equality Day, The People’s Town Hall, cosponsored by Women on 20s, Women You Should Know, Unite Women New York, and the Department of Records and Information Services/WomensActivism.NYC. A panel of speakers includes Liz Abzug (moderator) – consultant, professor, attorney/lobbyist; Rosemonde Pierre-Louis – Commissioner, NYC Mayor’s Office to Combat Domestic Violence, attorney, and advocate; Amy Paulin – Assemblywoman serving the 88th Assembly District of New York State; Laurie Cumbo – Democratic New York City Councilwoman serving the 35th District and Chair of Committee on Women’s Issues; and Nicholas Ferroni – educator and historian. The Town Hall runs from 6:45 to 8:30 p.m. Space is limited. RSVP to: http://www.nyc.gov/cgi-bin/exit.pl?url=https://www.greenvelope.com/event/PeoplesTownHall

Woodstock, New York is in the news with its town board resolution honoring its women’s history AND the announcement by the Woodstock School of Art about a new exhibit: “Overlooked: Woodstock Women Artists: Rediscovering Lesser-Known Painters.” The exhibit opens September 12 and runs throughOctober 31, 2015 with a reception on Saturday, September 12, 3-5 p.m.

Women’s suffrage newsletter is on the stands! on Vimeo.

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Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

Cooking school celebrates recipes during its first year of operation!

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Our hats off to Suffrage Wagon Cooking School recipes! on Vimeo.

When a birthday rolls around, we take advantage of it. Espacially when Suffrage Wagon Cooking School is in the spotlight for its first birthday party. We’re highlighting some of our best recipes as part of the August 26th programming. An overview of some cooking school videos during 2015:

Make Chinese Fortune Cookies at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Vimeo.

Celebrate Pi Day with American apple pie for women voters! on Vimeo.

Make a mean cup of coffee at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Vimeo.

Other video highlights during 2015: Fortune cookies preview. Affiliation with Suffrage Wagon Cafe. The why of Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. The desserts of Eighty Bug. How to make a mean cup of coffee promo.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking SchoolFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo.

Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s special August 26th program today!

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95th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on Vimeo.

Honor Bella Abzug. She made sure the U.S. Congress designated August 26th to commemorate the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. August 26th is the 4th of July for American women. That’s why we’re celebrating it at Suffrage Wagon Cafe during August.

WATCH FOR UPCOMING AUGUST 26TH EVENTS & CELEBRATIONS!

This year, 2015, has been a remarkable year for women’s history. The trend started about two years ago with storytelling about suffrage activists. Then the Womenon20s campaign blew the subject wide open with all the discussions about which women should be nominated to appear on U.S. currency.

So many women who’ve been invisible in American history previously are now household words. And the number of books telling the stories about votes for women are enough to make your head spin. Who would have believed it? This August 26th is the 95th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. That means five more years until the big national suffrage centennial in 2020. This year is a test run, so join in!

NEWS NOTES: Suffrage movement historic sites and community organizations have been planning special events for Women’s Equality Day on August 26th and the 95th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. Watch for announcements about an upcoming live feed for a national event.

Bella Abzug

Celebrate women’s freedom to vote during August with a party, reception, fundraiser, or a cookout. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has resources, videos, audio and more about the women’s suffrage movement.

(1.) August 26th in song. The table in the audio image is the freedom table where the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments was drafted in 1848 not far from Seneca Falls, NY. Cross your fingers that it will be on public display as 2020 approaches. We’ll keep you posted.

(2.) Rapping and Rolling about August 26th on video. Sound track by T. Fowler.

Rap and Roll to celebrate August 26th, Women’s Equality Day on Vimeo.

“Standing on the Shoulders” by Earth Mama is a reminder of why we do this work! This was the official theme song of the 75th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 20 years ago, and we’re still singing!

The National Women’s History Project gift shop has a 95th anniversary button and sticker to add to your women’s suffrage collection. Wear it. Order some for your August 26th event. The National Women’s History Project is celebrating its 35th year in 2015.
SuffrageWagonCafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo.  Check out 
SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Celebrate women’s 4th of July on August 8th at Suffrage Wagon Cafe!

Watch the Video

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is the go-to place! on Vimeo.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe opens its doors on August 8th for a special celebration of August 26th, Women’s Equality Day. August 26th is the 95th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. What does this mean? That American women have been citizens for 95 years, and 1920 is the year voting rights were finally won after a 72-year struggle. This voting rights observance isn’t an occasion to pass without some sort of recognition. It’s a perfect occasion for a party, whether it’s for friends and family, or your organization. With 2016 a big election year, community groups are staging events. There’s evidence of this around the nation. Still vague about August 26th? Need a refresher? Consult Wikipedia and other resources. And have fun!


SUFFRAGE WAGON COOKING SCHOOLFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

Suffrage Summer reading & July news notes

 Edward Henry Potthast (1857 - 1927)  Detail At the Seaside

SUMMER READING:

During the dog days of summer, curl up in a hammock under a tree or take time at the beach for summer reading. Need a women’s suffrage related list for summer reading? Here’s a bibliography by Margaret E. Gers that will point you in the direction of a good book related to women’s rights and the suffrage movement that will get you started at home or on the beach. Image: Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Detail – At the Seaside.

SUFFRAGE NEWS WRAPUP: August 26, 2015 is the 95th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Watch for the August 8th special program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe that celebrates this important occasion. First two episodes from Season 1 of “Suffrage Storytelling.” Story of the 4th of July co-conspirators. Fresh corn is in the markets straight from the fields. Find out a great way to cook it from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Three audio podcast series: “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”; “Playing Politics with the President”; and “The Night of Terror.” Video highlights from Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Stay in touch with what’s happening with suffrage centennial news, events and celebrations, whether you’re interested in past state suffrage centennials, upcoming, or the 2020 suffrage centennial in the U.S. Voting rights are as important today as they were at the turn of the 20th century.

News & views of the women’s suffrage movement on Vimeo.

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGONFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

No more goody-goody two shoes: Suffrage activists speak to us from the past!

Doris StevensECS-reporter2
Who are these two women? Left, Doris Stevens. Right, Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Both weren’t shrinking violets although if you learned conventional history in school, they were overshadowed by men in the story of this nation. We’re in the midst of suffrage centennial fever that started with state centennial celebrations launched by the western states.

WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS ARE HITTING THE NATION BY STORM!

In recent years, the following states celebrated their centennials of women winning the vote prior to 1920: Wyoming (1890), Colorado (1893), Utah (1896), Idaho (1896), Washington (1910), California (1911), Arizona (1912), Kansas and Oregon (1912). Montana and Nevada observed one hundred years of women voting in 2014 with special events, projects and activities. New York’s centennial celebration is scheduled for 2017, with Michigan, Oklahoma and South Dakota to follow. And oh, yes. There’s the upcoming national suffrage centennial in 2020.

We aren’t going back far in time to hunt for feisty and amazing ancestors and family members. They’re speaking to us from the past NOW. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has been on the case, publishing since 2009, to bring you up to date. We’re not balanced and full and effective human beings without embracing those who came before us. That’s why we’re clearing the decks so that Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Doris Stevens can speak their truth. Love them or hate them, we stand on their shoulders. Now’s the time to let them speak their minds.

THREE AUDIO PODCAST SERIES SHOW THE U.S. SUFFRAGE ACTIVISTS FOR THE COMPLEX AND PERSISTENT AND FESITY INDIVIDUALS THEY WERE:

(1.) “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. The story of the women of Seneca Falls, NY who planned the 1848 women’s rights convention. These audio podcasts tell how these activists had to get out of their comfort zone to pull off a social revolt in mind and spirit that sent shock waves through the nation in 1848. These selections by Elizabeth Cady Stanton are from her memoir, Eighty Years and More. Audio by LibriVox. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

(2.) “Playing Politics with the President.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Podcast #8. Podcast #9. This podcast series shows how from 1913 to 1917 that bolder tactics and strategies would become necessary if American women were to win the right to vote. Success came about as a result of everyone working together, especially the contributions of feisty devil-may-care types who worked alongside more traditional types of women. These podcasts are from Jailed For Freedom by Doris Stevens. Audio by LibriVox. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

(3.) “The Night of Terror.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Podcast #8. The story of how militant women suffrage activists were beaten and terrorized one night in their prison cells near the nation’s capitol in 1917. This audio narrative series isn’t for the faint of heart. The stories told here don’t represent the sentiment of all of the suffrage activists, but rather a segment of them who didn’t mind stepping out of women’s traditional roles and putting their bodies on the line. All of the activists contributed to the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. These podcasts are from Jailed For Freedom by Doris Stevens. Audio by LibriVox. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe has launched its storytelling series with the tale of how Bess, the best friend of Edna Kearns, got in trouble with her parents for a radical book circulating the rounds among young women of that generation. Stop by the Suffrage Wagon Cafe and meet Bess.

Suffrage Wagon CafeMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

A women’s suffrage myth & a great free book with the inside story! Marguerite’s Musings.

“Jailed for Freedom” by Doris Stevens is featured book on Suffrage Bookshelf on Vimeo.

You can listen to the “Jailed for Freedom” book read free on Librivox.
Suffrage Movement Myth

by Marguerite Kearns

Have you heard the perspective referred to above that has been getting spread around lately? It compares the English and American suffrage movements and concludes that the English suffragette movement was exciting and creative while the American suffrage activists were boring and trite. So sad that these sister movements are being pitted against each other. If there’s anything positive about this old myth being trotted out into public, it’s to give these faulty assumptions an airing.

THE MYTH COMPARING ENGISH AND AMERICAN ACTIVISTS

The myth of exciting versus boring relies on the assumption that the English suffragists’ use of property damage, that is, a degree of violence, placed the English suffrage movement in a position of being considered more interesting than the American women who were “polite.” Translate that to “nonviolent.”

Sweeping generalizations underlie this myth. In fact, the women’s rights movements in England and the United States were committed to nonviolence. And later on, the English tactics that included property damage were controversial in their time and did not represent the sentiments of all English women engaged in the movement. Suffrage activists on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean argued vehemently about the best tactics and strategies necessary to reach their goals. And while they disagreed about tactics, they remained committed to the goal of freedom.

"Marguerite's Musings" on Suffrage Wagon News ChannelTHROWING ROCKS AND BLOWING UP MAILBOXES

Sadly, the perspective comparing the Americans and the English relies on a misunderstanding. Nonviolent tactics and strategies are considerably more difficult and challenging to implement than a decision to resort to violence. Throwing rocks definitely has more juice for the purpose of a mainstream film. A commitment to nonviolent social change isn’t as visual and tension producing as deciding to blow up a mailbox.

In fact, the ties between American and English activists were close. And both movements, for all their differences, can be plotted on the same path of working within a rigid political and social structure to accomplish similar goals while facing considerable resistance from government to win voting rights. While the American suffrage activists remained committed to nonviolent strategies, there’s no doubt that violence was used against them, especially those who picketed the White House in 1917 and were imprisoned and assaulted by authorities.

THE SIMILARITIES ARE IMPORTANT TO APPRECIATE

Both the suffrage activists in England and the U.S. went up against hard-core resistance. The picketing of the White House in 1917 heightened awareness of the women’s suffrage movement in the U.S. And if these activists hadn’t been successful in impacting national policy, it’s difficult to predict now, in retrospect, if U.S. women would have won the right to vote at all in 1920.

This old tired myth comparing the two movements will hopefully lose its power once the public is better informed about the spirit and determination and dedication that kept American suffrage activists with their eye on the prize. Check out Doris Stevens’ work, “Jailed for Freedom.” These free audio files from Librivox fill in more of what it took for American women to win voting rights.

As more research on the women’s suffrage movement is completed, books are published, and the constituency interested in this part of history grows stronger, we’ll join hands across the Atlantic. I envision a grand parade or awards banquet where English and American women honor our suffrage activist ancestors and properly celebrate this extraordinary accomplishment of winning voting rights together.

Onward to the 2020 suffrage centennial celebration!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.