Tag Archives: Seneca Falls

VIDEO: Make a great cup of coffee at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School!

Make a mean cup of coffee at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Vimeo.

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Now’s your chance to become a hit with coffee lovers. The Suffrage Wagon chef, Ted Cutting, walks us through making the same type of coffee you’ve come to expect at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. The next cafe program on June 8, 2015 highlights a trip to Seneca Falls, NY, whether actual or virtual. Convention Days are coming up in July and Seneca Falls is expected to be a hot spot during the 2017 New York suffrage centennial celebration. Marguerite Kearns is your host on Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

Suffrage Wagon CafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blogMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Reporter Nellie Bly goes undercover on Day #2 of the Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s grand opening festival

Marguerite Kearns, your host

Suffrage Wagon Cafe: nellie Bly

With your host, Marguerite Kearns.

I’m back on this second day of the women’s history festival celebrating the opening of the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. This four-day festival started with my welcome greeting followed by the opening of the doors of the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. There was even a reminder that when you’re planning your next vacation, take a look at the video about visiting Seneca Falls, New York. It’s in the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States. Some folks consider it a destination for travel, but for me and many others, it’s a pilgrimage that women’s suffrage movement fans take seriously.

NELLIE BLY: A TRAILBLAZING INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER

In this Suffrage Wagon Cafe feature, we’re focusing on Nellie Bly, one of America’s early investigative reporters. And there’s an upcoming film: “10 Days in a Madhouse.” Pull up a seat for two videos and an audio selection. The more I know about reporter Nellie Bly, the more I appreciate the shoulders on which my grandmother Edna Kearns stood when she covered and edited Votes for Women news for New York City metropolitan newspapers from 1910 to 1920.

Many people are aware of America’s early press women especially Nellie Bly and Margaret Fuller. Relatively few are aware of how suffrage activists were in this wave of America’s early press women. They made noteworthy contributions as editors, columnists, publicists, and reporters.

SPECIAL ON SUFFRAGE WAGON CAFE: The production team for the upcoming film, “10 Days in a Madhouse” estimates its release date to be late in September of 2015. 

Nellie Bly, America’s muckraker, press woman, investigative reporter, and her “10 Days in a Madhouse” on Vimeo.

10 Days in a Madhouse Trailer from TriCoast Studios on Vimeo.

AUDIO READING OF “10 DAYS IN A MADHOUSE”: This is a selected reading from Librivox. Nellie Bly’s writing about her undercover work is in the public domain. This edited selection is part of Suffrage Wagon’s audio collection on Soundcloud.

 

AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: The “Suffragette” film from the UK has released its international distribution date as October 2015.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

A message from Marguerite Kearns on Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s opening: March 28, 2015

A welcome from your Suffrage Wagon Cafe host, Marguerite Kearns.

Marguerite Kearns’ welcome message for Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s opening, the go-to place for women’s suffrage programs on Vimeo.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is open. Welcome! This video highlights a special greeting from me, your host Marguerite Kearns. It’s important to note how Americans are making a connection today between their family histories and the larger sweep of American history. I’ve been telling everyone: “The result has been like a jolt of electricity that’s redefining our cultural identity. Dry accounts in history books aren’t enough anymore. We want our history alive and relevant.”

The Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s special campaign is called the “Spirit of 1776.” The goal is to restore the women’s suffrage movement to its proper place in American history. It’s about time this remarkable part of American history emerges from the shadows. I started out on this journey to find out about my suffragist grandmother, Edna Kearns, and I’m discovering so much more. Follow Suffrage Wagon Cafe on Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

Voting rights and how they were won continues to be a critical issue for our times. And because a woman may run for the U.S. presidency in 2016, the story of how women won the vote will be of increased interest. You can stay in touch with Twitter, Facebook, email and the quarterly newsletter. Follow the Suffrage Wagon.

The Suffrage Wagon Cafe is open. Join us for women’s suffrage history, events and issues! on Vimeo. We have menu items that have been prepared at the Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Seneca Falls, New York is a pilgrimage and a destination. Enjoy the highlights of visiting the national park at Seneca Falls, New York in this video feature. 

OTHER NEWS: Do you know that the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon will be exhibited at the New York State Museum in 2017, the state’s 2017 suffrage centennial observance? Video announcement.

Opening of Suffrage Wagon CafeStay current with the programs of Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Have fun with us at the Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog.

Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube. There are more than 100 videos made for and highlighting our channel. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

Can the U.S. catch up with the U.K. on suffrage movement awareness? Marguerite’s Musings

VIDEO: “Marguerite’s Musings” with Marguerite Kearns is a regular column about women’s history! on Vimeo.

Marguerite's Musings, a feature of Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

The United States is racing to catch up with the United Kingdom that has been far ahead in terms of bringing awareness of the historic women’s suffrage movement to public attention in recent years. Keep in mind that American audiences haven’t seen a home-grown major motion picture on the suffrage movement since 2004 with the HBO production “Iron Jawed Angels.” Excellent documentaries, especially independent productions, are being produced on the American shores, as well as YouTube and Vimeo offerings.

Public interest in the American suffrage movement has increased dramatically since the announcement about the U.K. “Suffragette” production team casting Meryl Streep in the role of Emmeline Pankhurst, the pivotal leader of the militant wing of the English suffrage movement.

THE SEPTEMBER 2015 “SUFFRAGETTE” FILM FROM THE U.K. HAS SHAKEN THINGS UP

The U.K. “Suffragette” film production directed by Sarah Gavron and written by Abi Morgan has announced the film’s release in September of 2015. In previous announcements, the release date had been in January 2015. Already there’s speculation among entertainment commentators about the production’s Oscar potential in 2016. While the United Kingdom has had the edge in terms of public attention, there’s a growing audience of those who want to know more about long and difficult struggle for U.S. women to win the right to vote from 1848 to 1920. Suffrage centennial events and celebrations in the U.S. and abroad are taking on an increased importance.

The 2004 HBO film “Iron Jawed Angels” introduced millions of Americans to the 1917 picketing of the White House by Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party. This led to the suffragists’ imprisonment, force feedings, and a round of publicity that wore down opposition to women winning the vote. The bold activism led to the eventual ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920 that expanded the franchise for American women. The Turning Point Suffragist Memorial project is organizing to honor this period of the suffrage movement in its fundraising to have a suffragist memorial completed and operational by the 2020 suffrage centennial.

THE U.K. HAS GRABBED THE LEAD IN SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT AWARENESS

The U.K.’s prominence in suffrage movement awareness has a lot to do with the “Suffragette” film as well as the high-profile media attention showered on the centennial observance of the death of English suffrage martyr Emily Davison in 2013. By comparison, the American suffrage martyr, Inez Milholland, is much less known. The centennial of her 1916 death in 2016 may bring Milholland out of obscurity. However, it’s too soon to tell if U.S. suffrage martyr Milholland will ever have the same public recognition as Emily Davison in the U.K.

The second season of the BBC suffrage sit com “Up the Women” has made the suffrage movement familiar to a broader segment of British television audiences. And the recent release of a major book, “Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary,” by Anita Anand (Bloomsbury) focuses on an Indian princess, the goddaughter of Queen Victoria and a high-profile player in the English suffrage movement.

The book “Sophia” is a great read, and this book doesn’t stand alone. There’s also a growing body of scholarly research about the U.S. suffrage movement that has eroded the movement’s relative obscurity. Some excellent books have been published in the U.S. over the past few years. The close ties between the American and English suffrage movement from 1900 through 1914 are also of increasing interest on both sides of the Atlantic. Projects in the process of development in the U.S. include the proposed national suffragist memorial in Lorton, Virginia and a statue of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton in NYC’s Central Park.

A LONG LIST OF THOSE PLANNING FOR UPCOMING SUFFRAGE EVENTS AND CELEBRATIONS

Various advocacy organizations and historic sites are already busy planning upcoming suffrage events from now through 2020. These include the National Women’s History Project, the Alice Paul Institute, AAUW, SUNY, the NYS Museum, New York City government, the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Foundation, the National Park Service, the New York State Council on the Humanities, NOW, the NYS Cultural Heritage Tourism Network, WAMC public radio Albany, Vision 2020, Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, Sewall-Belmont House, the Girl Scouts, historic sites and local historical societies, the New York History blog, Turning Point Suffragist Memorial, Votes for Women 2020, Newseum, feminist and voting advocacy organizations, scholarly journals, and many individuals, community organizations, media outlets, public officials, state agencies, and those offering special content such as theatre, workshops, and conferences. If you are aware of suffrage events and programs, let me know at suffragewagon at gmail.com so I can add them to the expanding list.

ACTIVITY AND AWARENESS HAS INCREASED DURING 2015 IN THE U.S.

State centennial celebrations held west of the Mississippi in recent years have brought considerable attention to how American women there first won the right to vote. Delta Sigma Theta made a major contribution to awareness of the participation of African-American women in the movement when it organized record numbers of its members to participate in the centennial parade observance in Washington, DC in 2013.

Susan B. Anthony’s 195th birthday was observed in February 2015 by suffrage movement fans across the U.S. Ambitious plans are also in the works to celebrate Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s 200th birthday in November of 2015. The Women’s Rights National Historic Park in Seneca Falls, New York has announced an active program schedule throughout the year.

Tens of thousands of activists were responsible for American women winning the right to vote. It’s a remarkable accomplishment that deserves to see the light of day. And this means opportunities to mobilize on the local, state and national levels. Don’t forget to bring memories and stories from family archives out of the closet and down from the attic. And support ALL suffrage-related events. If you demonstrate support for the efforts of others, the support will also be there for you.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

A video about contacting Santa with our wishes, plus Suffrage Wagon news notes

VIDEO about the annual ritual of writing down what we want for the holidays.  No news yet from the U.S. Congress about the prospect of moving the “Votes for Women” heritage trail out from the dungeon and onto the floor of Congress. But there’s been considerable speculation about the  possibility of the proposed Harriet Tubman national park passing through Congress because it has been tacked onto a defense appropriations bill. The national women’s history museum is in all of this mix. Pay attention this week to your favorite news junky sources and keep an eye on the proposed Harriet Tubman national park.

As for me, I’m stressing over the upcoming holiday. I made one breakthrough today after realizing that I have one gift idea already in Santa’s bag. Check out the posting about the new book, Remembering Inez. Visit SuffrageCentennials.com

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Follow the news about suffrage centennials.

Day #5 of the ‘Night of Terror” observance & the “why” of the White House picketing

Marguerite Kearns at Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

I’m late getting the blog post Day#5 finished, but it’s still 10:54 p.m. where I am. One of my stalwart friends asked me the other day: “But why did the women picket the White House in 1917? Couldn’t they have expressed their point of view in some other way?”

Good question and one that I welcome in this fifth day of partnering with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial to raise awareness of and support for the building of a suffragist memorial to honor those brave women who experienced the “Night of Terror” at the Occoquan Workhouse near Washington, DC in 1917.

When you look at the 1917 picketing from a larger perspective, put yourself back into time. How would you feel as someone in the second generation of women petitioning for the right to vote? Then turn the clock back to 1848 and the women’s convention at Seneca Falls, NY. This wasn’t the first occasion when women decided that enough was enough. But it’s the date when we start counting as far as the suffrage movement is concerned –when there’s no doubt that the nation heard the rumblings from impatient citizens who demanded participation in the public arena. The suffrage movement started in 1848 and concluded in 1920 with the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Keep this in mind: it was touch and go for a great deal of that time.

Think of it. Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and others spent 50 years petitioning for the vote by the turn of the 20th century. This is when my grandmother Edna Kearns and her generation stepped up to the plate and took over from the first wave of activists. By 1917, women had been working themselves into states of exhaustion by continuing to pressure for the right to vote. I’ve written a lot about Grandmother Edna Kearns. Here’s a video where she speaks for herself.

By 1917, my grandmother Edna B. Kearns had been in the suffrage fold for at least a decade. When’s the last time you spent ten years working on a single cause? Did you burn out? Were you even a bit annoyed or frustrated at your lack of progress? When the National Woman’s Party announced the White House picketing in 1917, many activists didn’t hesitate to join. However, others condemned them for taking such a bold action. The “suffrage movement” wasn’t one movement. It existed under an umbrella of women from many backgrounds.

Women joined the picket line from all over the United States. The National Woman’s Party needed people on the front lines who were prepared to go to prison, if necessary. And without the extraordinary support network that stretched across the United States, the campaign wouldn’t have been as effective.

This is Day #5 of blogging to honor the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

COMING SOON: The eight audio podcast series called the “Night of Terror.” You’ll get a ring-side seat account about what happened on November 15, 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4)

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Marguerite’s Musings and Podcast #7, “Playing Politics with the President”

Marguerite's Musings

I’m delighted to announce that my cousin Rosalie Morales Kearns has launched a new press in Albany, New York specializing in women’s writings:

Shade Mountain Press. The first title, Egg Heaven, has been favorably reviewed in Booklist and Foreword Reviews. This is terrific news! I’ve been curled up in the outside hammock reading Egg Heaven during the late afternoon over the past few days.

PODCAST #7: “Playing Politics with the President.” We’re getting close to the end of the audio podcast series. Here’s the series so far: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7 of the nine-audio podcast series about Woodrow Wilson and the suffrage movement. The audio podcasts are produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. From Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920.

A LAST MINUTE REMINDER: VISIT SENECA FALLS, NY:

Edna on a horseYour last chance to see the colorful countryside before all the gold and red leaves are on the ground and cold weather has set in. This past weekend Seneca Falls hosted people attending the Seneca Falls Dialogues. And don’t forget that special programs are ongoing at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park as well as exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. Also, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s birthday is coming up in November.

The Richard P. Hunt papers are open to the public at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park for the purpose of research. It’s a special event celebrating Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. The Hunt House in Waterloo isn’t far from Seneca Falls. The Hunt papers include a thousand separate items dating from 1828 to 1856. Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls. A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf. Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers.

All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about upcoming programs.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.