Tag Archives: Marguerite Kearns

From Marguerite Kearns, anchor: Video, women’s suffrage history, news notes, and suffrage movement links

VIDEO: Marguerite Kearns features women’s suffrage news and features on voting rights blog on Vimeo.

For all those who avoid reading, this video is a quick overview of the Votes for Women news notes of the past few weeks on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. You’ll get the picture in only a few minutes and still have some attention left.

LINKS TO CHECK OUT: Suffrage Wagon Cafe. The “Spirit of 1776″ campaign. Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. What suffrage activists like Edna Kearns were doing in 1915, one hundred years ago. VIDEO: How New York State will exhibit the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage wagon in 2017.

IN OTHER NEWS: From suffrage reporter Olivia Twine. Sojourner Truth’s favorite holiday, Pinkster, is celebrated in the Hudson Valley in May. Update on the campaign to put women on U.S. currency. You can participate in the Seneca Falls national park Selfie contest.


Suffrage Wagon CafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Washington’s Spies and the link to the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon: Suffrage Wagon Cafe special program

TURN: Washington’s Spies shows Long Island in 1777 and Suffrage Wagon Cafe program shows what happened 100+ years later on Vimeo.

Special Program: Suffrage Wagon Cafe

“TURN: Washington’s Spies” Foreshadows Suffrage Wagon Confrontation in 1913 by Marguerite Kearns

Activist Rosalie Jones was a loose cannon on Long Island back in 1913. She was controversial in public and in her own family. Rosalie Jones appeared often in the newspapers for her stunts and unusual Votes for Women demonstrations, such as marching to the state capitol and demanding to see the governor in 1912 and 1914. Without Rosalie Jones, we wouldn’t know that after more than 100 years after the American Revolution, some people on Long Island still supported English King George III.

A NEW TAKE ON AMERICAN HISTORY

Back in school, no teacher ever mentioned that during the war for independence significant numbers of Americans identified themselves with the British. Nothing demonstrates this more clearly today than Long Island as portrayed in the A&E television series, “TURN: Washington Spies” that goes into its second season on April 13, 2015. The tensions within Rosalie Jones’ own family on Long Island made the issue of Tory loyalties simmer and spill into the public arena in 1913.

If it hadn’t been for the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage wagon and its 1913 journey for Votes for Women organizing on Long Island, the continued polarization of the population might not have come to light. This confrontation in Huntington, NY is featured in this special article I wrote for New York Archives.

THE PLAYERS IN THE 1913 CONTROVERSY BETWEEN TORY AND PATRIOT DESCENDANTS

The players in July 1913: Suffrage activist Edna Kearns who drove the horse-drawn wagon called the “Spirit of 1776″ into Huntington, NY and Mary Livingston Jones, the mother of suffragist Rosalie Jones. Mrs. Jones identified herself as the descendant of Long Island Tories and demanded the activists stop immediately in their use of the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon. Edna Kearns told a Brooklyn Daily Eagle reporter (who covered the incident) that Mrs. Jones’ tirade made her fear for her life.

Mrs. Jones insisted the old horse-drawn wagon had been in the possession of Tory descendants the previous century, and she threatened legal action against the New York State Woman Suffrage Association for misrepresenting its history. The confrontation at the Huntington, NY parade had been provoked, no doubt, by the disagreements suffragist Rosalie Jones had with her mother and sister. Jones family members considered themselves the elite of Long Island for their long-time residency and old money. Rosalie didn’t view the Tory position and the anti-suffrage position as linked together. Her mother and sister did, however. In a 1913 article from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Mrs. Jones spoke of Tories and their prominence on Long Island as if the war for independence just happened yesterday.

WHY THE SECOND SEASON OF A&E’s “TURN” IS A GREAT TIME TO REVIVE THE SPIRIT OF 1776 STORY . . .

Long Island was divided in loyalties in 1776. A significant number of colonial sympathizers moved away after the Battle of Long Island. And the island became even more entrenched in loyalist support in the aftermath of the British capture of New York City. This was well portrayed in “TURN: Washington’s Spies” during its 2014 first season, enough for the intrigue and spy thriller to hook two million Americans and have them glued to their TV sets. So the TV series going into its second season performs a much-needed service of expanding the understanding of American history, even if some of the details have been crafted to meet the storytelling requirements of Hollywood.

Mrs. Mary Livingston Jones halted the Votes for Women parade in July 1913 with her claim that the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon had been in the possession of her ancestors, the Hewletts, before the suffrage movement decided on the vehicle’s use for grassroots organizing on Long Island. It was, therefore a Tory icon, not a patriot one, Mrs. Jones insisted.

The suffragists disagreed and proceeded to carry their own message of patriotic protest to towns and villages all over Long Island during the summer of 1913. More than 20 newspapers, including the New York Times, covered the splash caused by the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon and its supporters at suffrage demonstrations, rallies, and special fundraising events. See representative media. No legal action resulted, despite Mr’s Jones’ threats. Without the confrontation in Huntington, NY, we wouldn’t be privy to the fact that Long Island remained polarized between loyalists and patriots, on some level at least, more than a century after the end of the war for independence.

COLONEL HEWLETT PORTRAYED AS NICE GUY, IN THE WRONG PLACE AT THE WRONG TIME

If you’ve been following “TURN: Washington’s Spies,” the Hewlett name should be familiar to you. He’s the TV character wearing a red British uniform, not a bad guy actually –more like a decent guy in an extremely awkward situation. It’s not politically correct these days to make our former enemies, especially the English, look too bad. This happened back in 1917 with filmmaker Robert Goldstein, and a controversial trial that sent Goldstein off to federal prison for ten years. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson later commuted Goldstein’s prison sentence to three years. But the filmmaker’s crime had been specific: making the English look like brutes during the war for independence in his silent film, a crime not addressed under the First Amendment during World War I.

A 1913 Long Island history clearly identifies the Hewletts as the largest and most powerful of all Tory families on Long Island. So it shouldn’t have been necessary for the TV series to import a Hewlett from England to wear a red coat. In actuality, Hewlett represented a well-known household name for Tory support on Long Island. Hewlett family members remained on Long Island after the American war for independence after they officially declared their loyalty to the new nation.

DID THE TORY CONVERSIONS TO THE NEW NATION MAKE PEOPLE FORGET THEIR PREVIOUS LOYALTIES?

Pressures to become patriots didn’t make the Hewletts revolutionaries overnight any more than the threat of death convinced many Jews to willingly convert to Christianity at the time of the Inquisition. This had been Mrs. Jones’ point (indirectly) when she confronted the suffrage activists on the streets on Huntington, NY in July 1913, a perspective preserved by the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reporter’s account. Mrs. Jones made it clear that her relatives, the Hewletts, resented being linked to the colonial cause.

Long term, the Hewletts’ conversion to patriots seems to have been enough for family members to continue living on Long Island after the American Revolution without limping around, tails between their legs. Later, Hewlett family members became the source for stories told to the suffrage activists that the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon had been a symbol of patriotism, not Tory loyalties. The suffragists took advantage of the opportunity to spread this patriotic protest message in 1913. Patriotic protest had been a key theme of the suffrage movement going back to 1848 when the Seneca Falls, NY signers of the Declaration of Sentiments linked their civil rights struggle to the spirit of 1776 and the American Revolution. In 1913, Edna Kearns and other activists dressed in colonial costumes and milked the patriotic protest theme for all it was worth in the cause of votes for women.

But the Hewletts couldn’t shed their loyalist associations easily. The state education department, back when the agency was in charge of historical street markers, produced one marker to stand in front of the home of Richard Hewlett in Rockaway, NY. There, Richard Hewlett was acknowledged as the local Tory who planned the capture of General George Washington. Long Island newspaper accounts during the 1920s suggested that Tory loyalties and the threats on the life of George Washington were, in the opinion of many local residents, best forgotten. But with the second season of “TURN: Washington’s Spies,” we’re treated to a new spin on an old story.

RESOURCES: Videos about Rosalie Jones demonstrate how her support for Votes for Women might have annoyed her mother and sister who were avid supporters of the state and national anti-suffrage cause. “Rosalie Jones and her band of activists marched to Albany, NY in January 1914″; “Rosalie Jones’ hikes to Albany get people’s attention”; “Rosalie Jones; High-Profile Long Island Suffragist.”

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is openFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

Message from Dr. Helen Pankhurst on Day #4 of Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s opening festival!

Marguerite Kearns, your host

Hi, I’m Marguerite Kearns on our fourth and final day of the opening festivities for Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Today we’re delighted to showcase the message to American women voters from U.K. women’s rights activist Dr. Helen Pankhurst.

The casting of Meryl Streep to play English suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst in the “Suffragette” film has brought new attention to Pankhurst’s great-granddaughter. Dr. Pankhurst is also the granddaughter of Sylvia Pankhurst. The international release of the “Suffragette” film has been scheduled for October 2015.

Dr. Helen Pankhurst sends message to American women voters! Spirit of 1776 special from Suffrage Wagon Cafe  on Vimeo.

VIDEO SOUNDTRACK: “THE MARCH OF THE WOMEN” BY ELIZABETH JOHNSON

The video soundtrack features Elizabeth Johnson in a performance of “The March of the Women,” the anthem of the women’s suffrage movement in England. It was composed by Ethel Smyth in 1910 and became famous during the suffrage movement there. “The March of the Women” is still widely performed today.

The entire song by Elizabeth Johnson is available on the Suffrage Wagon audio channel (https://soundcloud.com/suffragewagon/march-of-the-women-sung-by-elizabeth-johnson-a-spirit-of-1776-special).

“SUFFRAGETTE” FILM BRINGS INCREASED ATTENTION TO VOTES FOR WOMEN

Dr. helen Pankhurst and her message to American women votersDr. Helen Pankhurst was recently featured in a photograph released on International Women’s Day in March 2015 showing her with the cast of the film “Suffragette.” This major motion picture from the U.K. stars Meryl Streep, Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, Ben Whishaw, Brendan Gleeson, Romola Gerai, and others. It is the first film ever to be shot at the Houses of Parliament in London. “Suffragette,” the film, highlights the struggles of women’s rights activists during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

DR. HELEN PANKHURST’S MESSAGE

“Both in the United States and in the United Kingdom, women fought long and hard for the right to vote, and to be voted in as politicians,” Dr. Pankhurst told Suffrage Wagon News Channel. “They faced derision and both private and public violence before attitudes started to change.

“The campaign for equal suffrage continues both in our two countries and all over the world. It is needed everywhere. Either the right for equality hasn’t been won, or it has in theory. But obstacles remain that impede progress on representation in practice,” Dr. Pankhurst continued.

“If we want a better world, every one of us needs to vote for those that are closest to representing our view in local and national elections. For those who feel their views are not represented by the current options of political candidates, more –not less—political activism is the solution. By caring enough to be politically engaged, we honor both ourselves and previous generations who campaigned for our right to have a voice,” Dr. Pankhurst concluded.

Although our SWAN Day opening festival at Suffrage Wagon Cafe has come to an end, we remain persistent in our goal of inspiring, motivating, educating, and entertaining audiences about how we stand on strong shoulders. The suffragists were “there” for us. Let’s be “there” for them by voting and becoming leaders in the world today.

IN OTHER NEWS: New York City will celebrate Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s 200th birthday on Thursday, November 12th with an artistic interpretation of the Declaration of Sentiments by feminists, activists, and artists at the Historic Great Hall at Cooper Union in New York City. More details to be announced. Stay tuned for updates and a surprise announcement about the music video, the “Spirit of 1776″ suffragette anthem starring Eighty Bug and the Suffragist Sisters. Suffrage Wagon Cafe will continue planning special programs and events.

Opening of Suffrage Wagon CafeWRAP UP OF THE SUFFRAGE WAGON CAFE OPENING FESTIVAL PROGRAMS:

Link to March 28, 2015 Program: Welcome from Marguerite Kearns, Suffrage Wagon Cafe host. The cafe menu. News about the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon exhibit. Video feature about visiting Seneca Falls, NY, a destination and a pilgrimage.

Link to March 29, 2015 Program: New 2015 film, “10 Days in a Madhouse” highlights the contributions of Nellie Bly, an early press woman and investigative reporter. There’s a film trailer, an intro from Suffrage Wagon Cafe, and a selected reading from Nellie Bly’s writing.

Link to March 30, 2015 Program: Elizabeth Johnson sings “In Her Sphere,” vintage music from the suffrage movement. Song appears in suffrage songbooks and it was sung at rallies. Video highlights the anti-suffrage movement. And book by Susan Goodier, “No Votes for Women,” gives an overview of the anti-suffragists’ opposition.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

The opening celebration of Suffrage Wagon Cafe continues: March 30, 2015

Marguerite Kearns, your host

Hi, I’m Marguerite Kearns, host of Suffrage Wagon Cafe, back again on the third day of our four-day festival. This special program highlights the anti-suffrage movement. The suffrage movement is considered to have taken from 1848 to 1920, quite a struggle. And we can appreciate the accomplishment when examining what the women’s suffrage activists were up against.

The featured video’s soundtrack is “In Her Sphere” by Elizabeth Johnson. The entire song can be found in Suffrage Wagon’s Soundcloud collection. The playful tune that takes on the opposition to women voting was sung at rallies and included in women’s suffrage songbooks.

“The Anti-Suffrage Movement” video with soundtrack, “In Her Sphere,” program of Suffrage Wagon Cafe on Vimeo.

“No Votes for Women: The New York State Anti-Suffrage Movement,” a book by Susan Goodier from on Vimeo.

"No Votes for Women" by Susan Goodier

 SUFFRAGE WAGON BOOKSHELF:

by Marguerite Kearns

It’s difficult to believe today the extent to which votes for women were bitterly resisted, even more so than women’s education and employment. From 1848 to 1920, women challenged their traditional roles and second-class citizenship on a scale that raised the hackles of enough special and commercial interests that the entire process of winning the vote took 72 years. As we know, the struggle for equality continues.

I never thought seriously or deeply about those who opposed votes for women, or the anti-suffragists as they were also known. To me, they represented an obstacle to be overcome, more abstract than real. My perspective was not only disturbed but expanded after reading “No Votes for Women: The New York State Anti-Suffrage Movement” by Susan Goodier (University of Illinois Press). I ended up being surprised about how I couldn’t put the book down until I reached the end.

The reason for my interest in the anti-suffrage movement stems from my curiosity, not only about my grandmother Edna Kearns’ suffrage organizing in New York City and on Long Island, but also the context of the times in which she lived and worked. After reading “No Votes for Women,” Edna Kearns’ published reports of attending anti-suffrage meetings as an observer and reporter took on a different meaning for me. The work gave depth and texture to my grandmother’s life and her commitment to women’s rights.

And it also opened my eyes to the differences between New York State’s anti-suffrage supporters and those in the rest of the nation. Goodier gives an overview to the anti-suffrage movement and focuses on New York State. She introduces us to its leaders and advocates. All of this suggested a surprising way for me to view the victory of New York State women in their winning of the vote in 1917.

When New York celebrates its suffrage centennial in 2017, we want as much material available as possible. And the anti-suffrage movement is an important part of the tale. The 1915 suffrage referendum in New York was hotly contested. And Goodier points out that the anti-suffragists gave the suffrage activists a run for their money. Though not many people have picked up on New York’s centennial celebration this year, some recognition puts the 1917 victory in sharper focus.

Because New York’s anti-suffragists diverted their efforts toward support of World War I, this left a vacuum for suffrage organizers to succeed, Goodier points out. This and other insights and commentary provide the reader with a more complete picture of a democratic process with dramatic implications for the turn of the 20th century as well as today. I highly recommend this book.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is openFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Meet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

A message from Marguerite Kearns on Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s opening: March 28, 2015

A welcome from your Suffrage Wagon Cafe host, Marguerite Kearns.

Marguerite Kearns’ welcome message for Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s opening, the go-to place for women’s suffrage programs on Vimeo.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is open. Welcome! This video highlights a special greeting from me, your host Marguerite Kearns. It’s important to note how Americans are making a connection today between their family histories and the larger sweep of American history. I’ve been telling everyone: “The result has been like a jolt of electricity that’s redefining our cultural identity. Dry accounts in history books aren’t enough anymore. We want our history alive and relevant.”

The Suffrage Wagon Cafe’s special campaign is called the “Spirit of 1776.” The goal is to restore the women’s suffrage movement to its proper place in American history. It’s about time this remarkable part of American history emerges from the shadows. I started out on this journey to find out about my suffragist grandmother, Edna Kearns, and I’m discovering so much more. Follow Suffrage Wagon Cafe on Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

Voting rights and how they were won continues to be a critical issue for our times. And because a woman may run for the U.S. presidency in 2016, the story of how women won the vote will be of increased interest. You can stay in touch with Twitter, Facebook, email and the quarterly newsletter. Follow the Suffrage Wagon.

The Suffrage Wagon Cafe is open. Join us for women’s suffrage history, events and issues! on Vimeo. We have menu items that have been prepared at the Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Seneca Falls, New York is a pilgrimage and a destination. Enjoy the highlights of visiting the national park at Seneca Falls, New York in this video feature. 

OTHER NEWS: Do you know that the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon will be exhibited at the New York State Museum in 2017, the state’s 2017 suffrage centennial observance? Video announcement.

Opening of Suffrage Wagon CafeStay current with the programs of Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Have fun with us at the Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog.

Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube. There are more than 100 videos made for and highlighting our channel. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

Can the U.S. catch up with the U.K. on suffrage movement awareness? Marguerite’s Musings

VIDEO: “Marguerite’s Musings” with Marguerite Kearns is a regular column about women’s history! on Vimeo.

Marguerite's Musings, a feature of Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

The United States is racing to catch up with the United Kingdom that has been far ahead in terms of bringing awareness of the historic women’s suffrage movement to public attention in recent years. Keep in mind that American audiences haven’t seen a home-grown major motion picture on the suffrage movement since 2004 with the HBO production “Iron Jawed Angels.” Excellent documentaries, especially independent productions, are being produced on the American shores, as well as YouTube and Vimeo offerings.

Public interest in the American suffrage movement has increased dramatically since the announcement about the U.K. “Suffragette” production team casting Meryl Streep in the role of Emmeline Pankhurst, the pivotal leader of the militant wing of the English suffrage movement.

THE SEPTEMBER 2015 “SUFFRAGETTE” FILM FROM THE U.K. HAS SHAKEN THINGS UP

The U.K. “Suffragette” film production directed by Sarah Gavron and written by Abi Morgan has announced the film’s release in September of 2015. In previous announcements, the release date had been in January 2015. Already there’s speculation among entertainment commentators about the production’s Oscar potential in 2016. While the United Kingdom has had the edge in terms of public attention, there’s a growing audience of those who want to know more about long and difficult struggle for U.S. women to win the right to vote from 1848 to 1920. Suffrage centennial events and celebrations in the U.S. and abroad are taking on an increased importance.

The 2004 HBO film “Iron Jawed Angels” introduced millions of Americans to the 1917 picketing of the White House by Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party. This led to the suffragists’ imprisonment, force feedings, and a round of publicity that wore down opposition to women winning the vote. The bold activism led to the eventual ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920 that expanded the franchise for American women. The Turning Point Suffragist Memorial project is organizing to honor this period of the suffrage movement in its fundraising to have a suffragist memorial completed and operational by the 2020 suffrage centennial.

THE U.K. HAS GRABBED THE LEAD IN SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT AWARENESS

The U.K.’s prominence in suffrage movement awareness has a lot to do with the “Suffragette” film as well as the high-profile media attention showered on the centennial observance of the death of English suffrage martyr Emily Davison in 2013. By comparison, the American suffrage martyr, Inez Milholland, is much less known. The centennial of her 1916 death in 2016 may bring Milholland out of obscurity. However, it’s too soon to tell if U.S. suffrage martyr Milholland will ever have the same public recognition as Emily Davison in the U.K.

The second season of the BBC suffrage sit com “Up the Women” has made the suffrage movement familiar to a broader segment of British television audiences. And the recent release of a major book, “Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary,” by Anita Anand (Bloomsbury) focuses on an Indian princess, the goddaughter of Queen Victoria and a high-profile player in the English suffrage movement.

The book “Sophia” is a great read, and this book doesn’t stand alone. There’s also a growing body of scholarly research about the U.S. suffrage movement that has eroded the movement’s relative obscurity. Some excellent books have been published in the U.S. over the past few years. The close ties between the American and English suffrage movement from 1900 through 1914 are also of increasing interest on both sides of the Atlantic. Projects in the process of development in the U.S. include the proposed national suffragist memorial in Lorton, Virginia and a statue of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton in NYC’s Central Park.

A LONG LIST OF THOSE PLANNING FOR UPCOMING SUFFRAGE EVENTS AND CELEBRATIONS

Various advocacy organizations and historic sites are already busy planning upcoming suffrage events from now through 2020. These include the National Women’s History Project, the Alice Paul Institute, AAUW, SUNY, the NYS Museum, New York City government, the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Foundation, the National Park Service, the New York State Council on the Humanities, NOW, the NYS Cultural Heritage Tourism Network, WAMC public radio Albany, Vision 2020, Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, Sewall-Belmont House, the Girl Scouts, historic sites and local historical societies, the New York History blog, Turning Point Suffragist Memorial, Votes for Women 2020, Newseum, feminist and voting advocacy organizations, scholarly journals, and many individuals, community organizations, media outlets, public officials, state agencies, and those offering special content such as theatre, workshops, and conferences. If you are aware of suffrage events and programs, let me know at suffragewagon at gmail.com so I can add them to the expanding list.

ACTIVITY AND AWARENESS HAS INCREASED DURING 2015 IN THE U.S.

State centennial celebrations held west of the Mississippi in recent years have brought considerable attention to how American women there first won the right to vote. Delta Sigma Theta made a major contribution to awareness of the participation of African-American women in the movement when it organized record numbers of its members to participate in the centennial parade observance in Washington, DC in 2013.

Susan B. Anthony’s 195th birthday was observed in February 2015 by suffrage movement fans across the U.S. Ambitious plans are also in the works to celebrate Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s 200th birthday in November of 2015. The Women’s Rights National Historic Park in Seneca Falls, New York has announced an active program schedule throughout the year.

Tens of thousands of activists were responsible for American women winning the right to vote. It’s a remarkable accomplishment that deserves to see the light of day. And this means opportunities to mobilize on the local, state and national levels. Don’t forget to bring memories and stories from family archives out of the closet and down from the attic. And support ALL suffrage-related events. If you demonstrate support for the efforts of others, the support will also be there for you.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

Suffrage Video Mania for Women Voters, with Marguerite Kearns, host of Suffrage Wagon Cafe

VIDEO: Mark your calendar for special suffrage movement programs for women voters at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe! on Vimeo.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe will open on March 28, 2015 as part of the international celebration of women artists called SWAN Day (Support Women Artists Now Day). It’s an initiative underway to imagine and manifest what it’s like for women’s art and perspectives to be fully integrated into the life of the planet. The long-term goal of SWAN Day is to inspire communities to recognize and support women artists as a basic element of civic planning.

SUFFRAGE WAGON CAFE IS GO-TO PLACE FOR NEWS, VIEWS & CELEBRATIONS OF THE SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is a platform of Suffrage Wagon News Channel that features lectures, music, film, conversation, and networking about the suffrage movement. Women’s History Month is a great time to subscribe.

SWAN Day is an annual event facilitated by WomenArts (www.womenarts.org) that’s scheduled for the last Saturday of Women’s History Month in March. The idea for SWAN Day grew out of a collaboration between Martha Richards of  WomenArts and Jan Lisa Huttner of Chicago’s WITASWAN (Women in the Audiences Supporting Women Artists Now).  For more information about SWAN Day events happening around the world, visit www.WomenArts.org/swan/.

WomenArts is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women artists have access to the resources they need for their creative work.  Its emphasis is on women in film, video, and theatre.  The WomenArts website provides free networking, advocacy, and funding information services to approximately 2,000 visitors a day.

OTHER VIDEOS ABOUT THE SUFFRAGE WAGON CAFE: Pass on the “Spirit of 1776″ video. Follow Marguerite Kearns and the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon. Grand opening of the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

Vote graphic on Suffrage Wagon Nes ChannelFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennial events and celebrations.