Category Archives: 60-Second History Lesson

Marguerite Kearns writing in suffrage anthology and lit review

Don’t be left behind! Head out to Votes for Women centennial celebrations in 2020 and 2017! on Vimeo.

Halloween special program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe

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Halloween program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe on Vimeo.

Welcome to the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

As a partner in the Inez Milholland Centennial of her death in 1916, we continue in our special coverage about how we’ve been writing Inez into American history. Inez is America’s suffrage martyr. She collapsed on October 25, 1916 when on a lecture tour of the West to appeal to women voters there to take part in the extraordinary effort to add the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Inez died on November 25, 1916, a special day for remembering. Inez was just thirty years old.  We’ve been urging everyone to watch the video, “Choose It and Use It,” a music video reminding us that when we vote, we’re also remembering Inez Milholland.

In our special Suffrage Wagon Cafe program for Halloween, we’re touching into the address Inez gave to the men running Essex County in upstate New York where Inez grew up and where she is buried today. In 1911, Inez gave them a piece of her mind about women being invisible and without representation. Today in 2016, Essex County in upstate New York is run only by men in elected positions.

Here is what Inez told them more than 100 years ago.

Inez MilhollandTaken from the September 19, 1911 speech by Inez Milholland to the Essex County Board of Supervisors

Gentleman, you are about to elect a representative to the Assembly of the State of New York. The man you elect will be sent to the legislature, to look after the interests of the people in Essex County.

         He is there to protect your rights, to voice your needs, and to safeguard your liberties…. He must do the right thing by you, no matter what the result to himself as a politician.

         You have had representatives in the past who did not play fair with you.  On the contrary, they left behind your interests, needs, and desires to look after themselves.

         You all know that a man will promise anything while he is running for office in order to get your support, your vote, and once he’s elected, more often than not, he often fails to keep those promises. You have all been fooled that way, time and time again.

         Unless—and here is your only protection   — unless the man you elect to office is a Just man. If he is fundamentally Just, he will deal fairly with you, whether or not he has hopes or desires for reelection.

         If he is fundamentally just, he will stand up for those measures in the legislature, no matter what party bosses may say, and no matter how much his stand may affect his chances of personal advancement.

         If he is fundamentally just, he will protect the weak. He will not only look after the interests of those who help him, but he will look after the interests of his constituents, who can give him nothing in return.

         But how are you going to tell whether or not your candidate for office believes in justice?

Here is one way. …..a man who protects the interests of those who can give him nothing in return, is a just man.

         At present women are —politically speaking—weak and without protection. That is, they have no guarantee that their interests will be safeguarded, their demands listened to, or their needs attended to… Women have to obey laws, which they have had no voice in making. This is contrary to the American idea of government, which is “government with the consent of the governed.”

         Women are taxed without being represented. This is contrary to the Revolutionary Idea on which our Republic was founded, which says that, “Taxation without representation is tyranny.”

         Women have the same interests as men: in clean government, good roads, and sound education. Yet they have nothing whatever to say about the laws. All these questions are handled by a legislature, which pays no attention to the wants, the needs or the voice of women… If women should break any one of these laws, which they have no voice in making, they would be fined, imprisoned, or put to death –exactly the same as men.

         Women, you see, pay all the penalties of citizenship, but enjoy none of its privileges…
No longer obscureMargaret Bartley is a former elected official in Essex County, New York who is determined to remember Inez Milholland. She reminds us that Inez took her case for women’s rights to the Essex County Republican Convention in Lake Placid where she received the unanimous support of the Republican Party. Two years later, she led a parade of 8,000 women marchers in Washington DC, during President Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration.

“She worked tirelessly for the cause of American women,” Margaret says. “In 1916, while delivering a speech in Los Angeles, Inez fell ill and died a few weeks later at the age of thirty. Her body was returned to her Meadowmount home here in Essex County, and over 2,000 people attended her funeral at the Lewis cemetery. Four years after her death the 19th amendment to the Constitution was passed in 1920 giving American women the right to vote. It took another 60 years, in 1980, before a woman became a member of the Essex County Board of Supervisors. The 18, 740 women of Essex County no longer have a representative or a voice in county government. This is also true for Essex County women in 14 of the 18 town councils in Essex County, New York. But it has not always been this way.”

“Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling explores equality on Vimeo.

Newsday, June 2015Marguerite Kearns is
the host at Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

Smell something good? Find out what’s going on at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School in the next special program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe. We’re in our second year and you can visit some of our videos.

Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future.

Women’s suffrage storytelling is expanded with audio podcasts!

Goal of 200 storytelling videos about women’s suffrage movement makes learning American history easy for young people on Vimeo.

THREE AUDIO PODCAST SERIES THAT SHOW THE U.S. SUFFRAGE ACTIVISTS FOR THE COMPLEX AND PERSISTENT INDIVIDUALS THEY WERE:

(1.) “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7.

(2.) “Playing Politics with the President.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Podcast #8. Podcast #9.

(3.) “The Night of Terror.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7. Podcast #8.

Videos keep people coming back to see what’s new on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Highlights of some of the personal videos about Edna Kearns and family. We’re adding new videos often. AND TAKE NOTE OF OUR EXPANDING COLLECTION OF AUDIO PODCASTS!

Reminder to vote from Suffrage WagonFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platforms on Vimeo and YouTube.

Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blogMeet your friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Follow SuffrageCentennials.com for news and views about upcoming women’s suffrage centennial events and celebrations. 

“Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today and its impact on the future. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Honor the grandmothers in the kitchen!

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Honor the grandmothers in the kitchen! on Vimeo.

The year 2016 is an election year –more reason than ever to remember the grandmothers and great grandmothers who spent more than 72 years working to win voting rights for women.

When you visit Suffrage Wagon Cooking School you’ll see a representative sampling of the cooking demonstrations during 2015, plus an archive. Chef Marguerite is your host.

Chef MargueriteFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on Vimeo.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is closed during January 2016. Programming resumes in February. Your host: Marguerite Kearns.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. Suffrage Wagon is a partner in the Inez Milholland Centennial observance in 2016. Inez Milholland is America’s suffrage martyr.

Birthday celebration on December 25th: Edna Kearns & Martha Wright!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Happy Birthday, Edna Buckman Kearns, suffrage activist! on Vimeo.

December 25th birthdaysHappy birthday Edna Kearns and Martha Wright on December 25th.

Tara Bloyd, Edna’s great granddaughter, signed in support of funding for the New York State women’s suffrage centennial commission. See letter sent to NYS Governor Andrew Cuomo to urge inclusion of the suffrage centennial commission in the upcoming state budget. The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon used by Edna Kearns in the New York State suffrage organizing campaign is part of our 2015 “Ask Santa” effort.

NYS state suffrage centennial 2017

Happy New yearFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

A major accomplishment of 2015: Support for “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon

Suffrage Wagon News ChannelHelp us celebrate a major media campaign defining 2015. We’ve been spreading the word about the ongoing effort to support the New York State Museum in putting the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage Wagon on permanent exhibit.

We were thrilled when Newsday (Long Island, NY) published a two-page spread in June 2015 about the campaign. The effort to support the NYS Museum’s permanent exhibition of the “Spirit of 1776” wagon continues with the video celebrating suffrage activist Edna Kearns’ birthday on December 25th. Support for the permanent wagon exhibit is part of the “Spirit of 1776” media campaign for 2015.

For more information about the “Spirit of 1776” campaign wagon used by Edna Kearns in the New York State suffrage campaign. In 2016 we will be remembering the first time the “Spirit of 1776” wagon was exhibited in New York State in Kingston, NY back in 1986, almost thirty years ago.

We continue gathering support for the permanent exhibit of the “Spirit of 1776” wagon. Plan to visit the New York State Museum when the wagon is on exhibit during 2017 as part of the state’s suffrage centennial observance. And support the wagon’s permanent exhibit.  Join us!

Newsday, June 2015

Newsday article, page 2, June 2015

Happy Birthday, Edna Buckman Kearns, suffrage activist! on Vimeo.
Suffrage StorytellingThe stories of Edna Buckman Kearns and friends are featured on the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe. Your host: Marguerite Kearns.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. Suffrage Wagon is a partner in the Inez Milholland Centennial observance in 2016. Inez Milholland is America’s suffrage martyr.

Episode #10 of Suffrage Storytelling: Bess cautions Edna about falling in love!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Episode #10 of “Spirit of 1776” Suffrage Storytelling! on Vimeo.

Over 100 years ago young women questioned marriage and whether or not it was in their best interest. Back then, women were property, not individuals with the rights of citizenship. Women were expected to pay taxes and accept their second-class citizenship. “No way,” said Bess, Edna’s best friend. Bess decided that she didn’t want to get married if it meant giving up the freedom to realize her potential rather than be evaluated on how well she cooked and cared for children.

100 YEARS AGO YOUNG WOMEN LOOKED FOR WAYS TO COMBINE FAMILY AND FREEDOM TOO!

Edna May Buckman wanted freedom and family too. She believed that partnership could be linked to equality, but she had to find the right man who would be committed to this vision. When Edna started seeing Wilmer Kearns, Bess stepped in. Episode #10 of the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling highlights Edna’s search to find the right partner.

COMING NEXT ON EPISODE #11 OF SUFFRAGE STORYTELLING

In Episode #11, Edna invites Wilmer to meet her family. But will Wilmer make a good impression? Already we’ve discovered that Edna loves Wilmer’s storytelling, but she hates his pipe and cigar. Wilmer is figuring out whether or not Edna is worth changing his lifestyle. But he needs advice. In New York City where Wilmer is working at his first job, he meets Aunt Sarah. She isn’t his biological aunt. But Aunt Sarah loves young people and giving advice. Enjoy Episode #10, and stay tuned for Episode #11 in this first season of Suffrage Storytelling.

Meet Bess at Suffrage Wagon CafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

Special video program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe: Happy Holidays!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

VIDEO: Fun building on women’s history, past hard work and accomplishments! from Marguerite Kearns on Vimeo.

A star for Inez Milholland, America’s women’s suffrage martyr on Vimeo.

Happy holidays from the people at Suffrage Wagon News Channel! on Vimeo.

A Wish for Santa: Support Permanent Exhibit of “Spirit of 1776” Wagon! on Vimeo.

We’re thrilled to devote the December 8, 2015 program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe to videos that highlight the upcoming holiday season. Wish upon a star for the 2016 Inez Milholland centennial. Celebrate the 72 years that American women campaigned vigorously for the right to vote.

Honor the extraordinary work and sacrifice that went into the largest nonviolent grassroots social revolution in the history of the United States. Make sure you see two important films: “Suffragette” (about the English suffrage movement) and “10 Days in a Madhouse” (about Nellie Bly, trailblazing investigative reporter who covered the suffrage movement).

ASK SANTA TO SUPPORT THE PERMANENT EXHIBITION OF THE “SPIRIT OF 1776” SUFFRAGE CAMPAIGN WAGON USED BY EDNA KEARNS

Ask Santa for his support of the permanent exhibit of the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon used by suffrage activist Edna Kearns in the Votes for Women activism. The wagon is in the collection of the New York State Museum. And we’re thrilled that it will be on exhibit in 2017, the state’s suffrage centennial observance. Let’s visualize the wagon on exhibit in 2020 and beyond. Thank the State of New York for its creation of a state suffrage centennial commission for 2017, as well as the financial support of the events and activities.

Happy holidays! And follow Season I of the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. In 2016, the Suffrage Wagon Cooking School will feature recipes and a cooking contest. The cooking school celebrated its first birthday in 2015. And visit the Suffrage Wagon’s archival library. Stay tuned!

Meet Bess at Suffrage Wagon CafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

Happy December from Marguerite Kearns & Suffrage Wagon News Channel

Support Suffrage Storytelling during Season I: Drama, action, and fun! on Vimeo.

Happy holidays from “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling. Season I continues with Bess, Wilmer and Edna. Meet Jonathan Geffner, ventriloquist, a special guest on Suffrage Storytelling. We’re up to Episode #9. Watch the videos and catch up with past episodes.

Did you see the Suffrage Wagon News Channel news notes for November? Catch up now!

Women’s Suffrage Holiday News Notes on Vimeo.

COMING SOON: Marguerite Kearns interviews the director and producer of the new film, “10 Days in a Madhouse.” A new program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe on December 8, 2015. A December 25, 2015 birthday celebration for Edna May Buckman. Celebrating the grandmothers at Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

At Suffrage Wagon Cooking School we’ll be cooking for the holidays. Check out the cooking school programs for 2015.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking SchoolFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Happy Thanksgiving with Suffrage Movement News Notes

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Women’s Suffrage Holiday News Notes on Vimeo.

Happy Thanksgiving from Marguerite Kearns and Suffrage Wagon News Channel with this video of news notes! It’s an overview of the postings we’ve been featuring during November 2015.

The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling is in its first season. Follow the adventures of Bess, Edna, and Wilmer.

At Suffrage Wagon Cooking School we’ll be cooking for the holidays. Check out the cooking school programs for 2015.

Suffrage Wagon Cafe is openFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Episode #9: Bess tells why Mary Wollstonecraft upset so many people on Suffrage Storytelling!

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Episode #9 of “Spirit of 1776″ Suffrage Storytelling.” Mary Wollstonecraft on Vimeo.

Mary WollstonecraftMany people haven’t heard of Mary Wollstonecraft today. She wrote about women’s rights in the late 1700s. And even by 1900, Mary was still considered a hot property because of the controversy she stirred up. Mary not only found fault with men who put women into subservient positions. She also criticized women for going along with the program. She called them “servile parasites.” this upset a lot of people.

Bess, Edna’s best friend. got in trouble at home after her parents found a copy of Mary Wollstonecraft’s writing in her bedroom: “A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.” This work influenced women, not only in England, but throughout the world. Bess read Mary Wollstonecraft, and she made sure her friends did too!

There’s a small but determined group in the UK organizing to build a memorial sculpture honoring Mary Wollstonecraft. They need money and as much support as possible. Check out the website and support maryonthegreen.org

SuffrageWagonCafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

Episode #8: The Good & Bad News of “Spirit of 1776” Suffrage Storytelling

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

Episode #8: “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling with special guest, Jonathan Geffner on Vimeo.

THE GOOD NEWS & THE BAD NEWS!

How’s Wilmer Kearns doing in his ongoing effort to win the heart of Edna Buckman? Well, there’s good news and there’s bad news. Edna loves Wilmer’s storytelling. The bad news is that she hates his pipe and cigar. Edna’s mother May Begley Buckman was a temperance activist and these two items (a pipe and cigar) are on May’s “no no” list. It could be worse. May dislikes alcohol even more and Wilmer’s happens to like beer. And this only complicates matters. But Wilmer’s of the opinion that he’ll address these obstacles one at a time.

Are you wondering about the temperance movement? More than 100 years ago alcohol was even more of a problem than it is now. And some people like Edna’s mother got on the bandwagon to do something about it. See PBS special trailer.

THE PLOT THICKENS AS WILMER KEARNS FACES A NEW PROBLEM

The situation with Wilmer is complicated by the fact that his first job was in the accounting office of a cigar manufacturing firm in New York City, a rapidly growing industry at that time. The combination of cigars and booze didn’t endear Wilmer to Edna’s family. They didn’t know about Wilmer’s fondness for beer –only cigars. And Wilmer’s looking in the mirror mornings to ask himself: Which is more important? Edna or cigars?

The solution? Wilmer needs advice and he’ll ask Aunt Sarah. Meanwhile, the writings by Mary Wollstonecraft are still causing problems. Coming soon on Episode #9 of “Spirit of 1776” suffrage storytelling. Stay tuned!

Special thanks to Jonathan Geffner, special guest on Episode #8.

Suffrage Wagon CafeFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com for trends, news and views about upcoming suffrage centennials. 

The Buzz about “10 Days in a Madhouse”: Featured program at Suffrage Wagon Cafe

WATCH THE VIDEO ON SUFFRAGE WAGON

“10 Days in a Madhouse” film opens in November 2015 on Vimeo.

by Marguerite Kearns

Welcome to Suffrage Wagon Cafe. I had the pleasure recently of interviewing Susan Goforth and Timothy Hines. Susan is the producer and her husband Timothy Hines, the director of “10 Days in a Madhouse.” The film featuring investigative reporter Nellie Bly and starring Caroline Barry, Christopher Lambert, Kelly LeBrock and others. It’s available in US theaters staring this week in a staggered release across the nation (Pandragon Films).

The production is based on Nellie Bly’s actual undercover investigative reporting on Blackwell’s Island, a mental hospital before the turn of the 20th century. It’s an important film, the type of production that’s in short supply these days –a work about women who are more than secondary characters, but rather pivotal individuals who move the plot forward.

THE U.S. FILM THAT TRANSFORMED THE PEOPLE WHO MADE IT!

"10 Days in a Madhouse" film“10 Days in a Madhouse” producer Susan Goforth had this to say when we first corresponded about the film in production: “I’m sure there are many women out there inspired by Nellie Bly as you and I. More than ever, we need a positive female role model for the upcoming year. It’s my privilege to serve in the making of this movie, a movie far greater than the sum of its parts, a movie that has already transformed the lives of the hundreds of people who helped make it. Surely Nellie Bly’s spirit has been involved in making this amazing film!”

I read the Nellie Bly biography by Brooke Kroeger and found it a fascinating account of her life. That’s when I found out many more details about Nellie, including her press coverage of the U.S. women’s rights movement. Nellie’s interview with Susan B. Anthony opened people’s eyes across the nation about this icon as a private person as well as her dedication as a women’s rights activist over decades. Nellie also covered the 1913 big suffrage parade in Washington, DC. She spoke her mind and attracted attention and scrutiny about a wide variety of issues. This film is opening doors to an understanding of women in the past who have made a difference.

NELLIE BLY AS A SUFFRAGE ACTIVIST AND MUCH MORE

Librivox, Nellie BlyBut “10 Days in a Madhouse” isn’t about Nellie as a suffrage activist. That’s background. The film expands our understanding of Nellie’s undercover journalistic coverage that opened the door for change in funding and policy making for publicly-funded institutions. It’s shocking. It’s informative. And the film is a must see.

The film stays true to Nellie’s journalistic accomplishments in a production that’s expected to be in the spotlight during the Academy awards in 2016. You can see it now. The production features 90% women. It’s a valuable tool for teaching and learning about Nellie Bly and her cutting-edge work in investigative journalism.

Listen to Nellie’s own words in the entire print coverage of “10 Days in a Madhouse” on Librivox. The Suffrage Wagon News Channel edited version is shorter (about four minutes). Stretch out with the audio before you see the film. More coming soon about “10 Days in a Madhouse.”

SuffragetteWhile you’re planning for a night out on the town, add the film “Suffragette” to your list. Susan Goforth and Timothy Hines believe the two films together will have people talking and thinking for quite a while. Support women filmmakers, performers, directors, producers, and production staff. We’re about to witness change when it comes to women in the entertainment industry. Support what’s on its way and demonstrate that we want more!

Cup of coffeeThank you for stopping by Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Suffrage Wagon News Channel has a video platform on VimeoIn your free time, meet friends at the Suffrage Wagon Cafe.

SuffrageCentennials.com features trends, news and views about suffrage centennials. “Choose it and Use it” is a video reminding us of how the past is linked to what we do today, as well as its impact on the future. We’re celebrating voting rights and women’s freedom to vote! Join us.

Kearns Family Members Got Together over the Holidays: Marguerite’s Musings

Marguerite's Musings

It’s always fun to stumble on a family connection. It’s one thing to know that my Kearns relatives are still based in Beavertown, PA where my grandfather Wilmer Kearns was born. And it’s even more exciting to know the extent of their ties and how they spent the holidays visiting, either in the NYC area or Beavertown, PA

I found a social notice of Max and Peg Kearns (Wilmer’s brother and sister in law) visiting Wilmer and Edna Kearns in 1917 in the South Side Observer of Long Island, December 30, 1917. “Mr. and Mrs. Charles Maxwell Kearns, of Pennsylvania, are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Kearns for several weeks.”

I’m busy documenting how Wilmer Kearns served as treasurer of Kearns Motor Car Company, the family business,  when he and Edna lived in New York City. And Lulu Kearns, Wilmer’s sister, played an important part of suffrage organizing with my grandmother Edna Kearns in 1913.

A holiday video greeting.

Another opportunity to celebrate the holidays with the Suffrage Wagon on Vimeo.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

100 Years Ago in Two Videos: Marguerite’s Musings

Marguerite's MusingsONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO:

A review of the suffrage “hike” or march to Albany, New York in January 1914,  a little over 100 years ago. My grandparents Edna Kearns, Wilmer Kearns, and my mother’s older sister Serena Kearns started out from New York City on January 1, 1914 with Rosalie Jones and a band of other brave souls. The first video version about the march or “hike” to Albany, NY highlights newspaper articles of the period. It’s followed by a feature where I had fun. Check out the second video version.

Here’s another version of the same event with images from the Library of Congress and several examples of memorabilia from the Suffrage Wagon News Channel collection.

A review of the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series in the event you missed any of the episodes: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House and prison time in 1917.

FacebookCOMING SOON: The fall issue of the quarterly newsletter. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Please join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

A homework assignment for the “Night of Terror: A basic video to start

Marguerite's Musings, a feature of Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

The other day a friend of mine asked me for homework? “What do you mean?” I responded.  I couldn’t help but consider the question a joke. Then the talk grew serious. She really wanted a video, a podcast, or a crash course on the suffrage movement, an exciting part of American history. Either she’d been absent at school when the “Night of Terror” had been taught, or the 1917 picketing of the White House by American suffrage activists simply wasn’t in any of her teachers’ lesson plans. Fortunately Suffrage Wagon is partnering with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial on the November 15th “Night of Terror” observance, or I wouldn’t have been able to respond so fast.

OK. Here it is. If you haven’t seen the Lady Gaga parody, watch it. The video always reveals surprises. And while you’re watching, imagine that the streets near the White House in 1917 as bedlam some days when the women lined up with their picket signs. By the time November 15th rolled around, things were hot and heavy at the Occoquan Workhouse, the scene of the “Night of Terror.” I always think of it personally, as when my grandmother Edna Kearns and my aunt, Serena Kearns, then 12 years old, joined hundreds of others from around the nation to stand vigil at the White House gates in the U.S. Capitol to press for change.

From November 1 through November 15, Suffrage Wagon News Channel is partnering with the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial to draw attention to the “Night of Terror” at the Occuquan Workhouse near Washington, DC. This means that Turning Point Suffragist Memorial will be Tweeting like mad, and you can touch in with my musings over the next two weeks. Tweets and Facebook deliver the updates. Or you can subscribe by email.

Watch the video. Take a careful look at this music video produced in 2012 by Soomo Publishing that took the nation by storm and won a raft of awards for excellent educational programming. The “Bad Romance” video highlights the picketing at the White House, as well as the process of ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. A lot to cram into a video of about three minutes. But it’s worth the effort. It takes much more than three minutes to explain the suffrage movement that took 72 years. So consider yourself significantly up to speed. And pass this along this history to women voters headed for the polls on Tuesday. This video alone is reason enough to vote, but we’re building a foundation to celebrate suffrage centennials in the future, including the 2020 suffrage centennial.

The next two weeks constitutes a crash course on the suffrage movement, with the end point of the “Night of Terror” in mind on November 15th. In another segment of my “Musings,” I’ll review the content of the nine podcast series recently completed on Suffrage Wagon News Channel called “Playing POlitics with the President.” It gives the background as to why the suffragists of the National Woman’s Party picketed the White House in the first place. But I’ll get to that soon. Stay tuned!

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Suffrage centennials are getting a lot of play…

"Night of Terror" podcasts on Suffrage Wagon News ChannelSuffrage centennials are getting a lot of play these days. There’s special programming on WAMC Albany, NY today about the upcoming election called “Susan B. Anthony Voted. Did you?” And the upcoming “Night of Terror” podcasts to commemorate November 15th are in the works. Stay tuned! Both events above have the 2020 suffrage centennial celebration in mind.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series in the event you missed any of the episodes: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party to picket the White House followed by prison time in 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

The audio series “Playing Politics with the President” is the background context to the upcoming “Night of Terror” audio podcasts. The audio podcasts are from Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920 book. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West and others.

FacebookCOMING SOON: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Please join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

New “Wonder Woman” Book, plus video, & final podcast for “Playing Politics with the President”

Wonder Woman bookThe Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore is out. I haven’t had a chance to order the book yet. The advance publicity says  the text makes a connection between Wonder Woman’s creator and the impact the suffrage movement had on him.

Today’s the last day of audio podcasts for “Playing Politics with the President.” My, you’ve been patient. Over the next few weeks we’ll be hearing the “Night of Terror” — a turning point in the suffrage movement in 1917 following the arrests at the White House and imprisonment at the Occoquan Workhouse. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is holding its first annual “Night of Terror” observance from November 1 through the 15th as a fundraising event. Stay tuned!

VIDEO REMINDER: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter will be published soon. Make sure you’re subscribed. Issues are published in the summer, fall, winter, and spring.

PODCAST #9: “Playing Politics with the President.” Summary: As the activists of the National Woman’s Party ran out of options, Alice Paul and others shifted their sights to making suffrage a political issue and organizing the women voters of the Western states that won the franchise earlier than the rest of the nation. A comparison to the English suffrage movement is included in this final podcast of the series. The story is from Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House and prison time in 1917.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon with email, on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Heat up the oven: Video and Podcast #8 of “Playing Politics with the President”

Cooking Challenge

Who was the better cook? The woman who believed in voting? Or the woman who opposed the idea? This may sound outlandish to us today, but the thought wasn’t so peculiar back when the “suffs” challenged the “antis” to a cooking contest. See the great article from the archives.

Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOT VIDEO: Make scones in your kitchen with Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. Gather your friends and family members around and pull some fresh traditional English scones out of the oven to serve with hot beverages.

Podcast #8: “Playing Politics with the President.” Summary: Some people fold up in the face of opposition. For many suffragists, however, many became even more determined. U.S. President Woodrow Wilson had plenty of opportunities to come to terms with the issue of women voting. The activists sent deputation after deputation to visit Wilson. Repeatedly he told them he had more important business on his mind. It could have been easy, but Wilson chose the difficult route.

More than 60 years had passed since the 1848 Seneca Falls women’s rights convention. Enough already, said the National Woman’s Party. From this point on, suffrage becomes a difficult political issue. And coming soon: The story of the White House suffrage pickets, the “Silent Sentinels.” We’re getting closer to the end of this podcast series: “Playing Politics with the President.” Only one more podcast in this series. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. From Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920.

Here’s the “Playing Politics with the President” series so far: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House and prison time.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon with email, on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Marguerite’s Musings and Podcast #7, “Playing Politics with the President”

Marguerite's Musings

I’m delighted to announce that my cousin Rosalie Morales Kearns has launched a new press in Albany, New York specializing in women’s writings:

Shade Mountain Press. The first title, Egg Heaven, has been favorably reviewed in Booklist and Foreword Reviews. This is terrific news! I’ve been curled up in the outside hammock reading Egg Heaven during the late afternoon over the past few days.

PODCAST #7: “Playing Politics with the President.” We’re getting close to the end of the audio podcast series. Here’s the series so far: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7 of the nine-audio podcast series about Woodrow Wilson and the suffrage movement. The audio podcasts are produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. From Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920.

A LAST MINUTE REMINDER: VISIT SENECA FALLS, NY:

Edna on a horseYour last chance to see the colorful countryside before all the gold and red leaves are on the ground and cold weather has set in. This past weekend Seneca Falls hosted people attending the Seneca Falls Dialogues. And don’t forget that special programs are ongoing at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park as well as exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. Also, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s birthday is coming up in November.

The Richard P. Hunt papers are open to the public at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park for the purpose of research. It’s a special event celebrating Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. The Hunt House in Waterloo isn’t far from Seneca Falls. The Hunt papers include a thousand separate items dating from 1828 to 1856. Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls. A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf. Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers.

All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about upcoming programs.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Podcast #6: “Playing Politics with the President”

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Audio Podcast #6: In the story background of this audio series, many suffrage activists played a waiting game with U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. First, they decided to use each and every opportunity to work through the political system. Once everything else has been tried with no substantial results, they understood the necessity to move to another level.

This audio podcast gives the overview and background which means you’ll have to be patient sitting through a two-minute explanation of the view that persistence and determination will pay off… eventually. The tale is from real life. A waiting game. No car chases. Just the nuts and bolts of what it took over time for women to win the vote in the United States. Listen to this sixth podcast in the series about the long campaign in “Playing Politics with the President.”

The piece starts out by discussing the suffrage association’s annual budget spent on lobbying for an amendment to the Constitution in the context of suffragist Alice Paul’s leadership and organizing. If this is the first time you’ve checked into this audio series, you might be scratching your head and wondering what this is all about. The story: suffrage movement strategy is shifting from a state to a national strategy to win the vote. Soon in the chronology they’ll be considering a bolder and more direct approach. There are some nuggets of factual gold to be found in this descriptive swamp of Washington, DC politics.

SUMMARY SO FAR: “Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6 of the nine-audio podcast series. The content is from Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom, 1921. Audio production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

VIDEO COMING SOON: Traditional English scones from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. It’s a great idea when planning your next social gathering or fundraiser to invite friends, family, or for your organization.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Hot English Scones and Suffrage Wagon News Notes

PumpkinRecipesNew video for this posting, all about the audio podcast series.  Plus a reminder that the time is right to combine a fall trip to see the colorful landscape with events in Seneca Falls, NY. Get a shot of inspiration by watching the Seneca Falls video from Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

When planning a social event at home or for your organization, consider making English scones. They’ll be fresh out of the oven and won’t cost you an arm and a leg. At bakeries it isn’t unusual to spent up to $2 and more for a scone. Take note of the ingredients and watch for the video, coming soon, from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Ingredients: 3 cups all-purpose flour; 1/2 cup white sugar; 5 teaspoons baking powder; 1/2 teaspoon salt; 3/4 cup butter; 1 egg beaten; 1 cup milk. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Process: In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut in butter. Mix the egg and milk in a small bowl and stir in flour until moist. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead quickly. Roll dough out onto a 1/2 inch thick round on a lightly floured surface round. Cut into eight wedges and place on the prepared baking sheet. Bake 15 minutes in the preheated oven or until golden brown.

Are you following the audio podcast series, “Playing Politics with the President?” A video reminder. This is the second series of podcasts from Suffrage Wagon News Channel. The previous series, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls,” is great to inspire you to plan a visit to Seneca Falls, NY this month. Check out events.

“Playing Politics with the President” summary: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5 of the nine-audio podcast series from “Jailed for Freedom” with Doris Stevens. This is the series so far: The programming starts with the big 1913 Washington, DC parade and moves into the suffrage deputations to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. The pressure is on to push for votes for women. Series production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

 IN OTHER NEWS: There’s a lot of fascinating news in cyberspace. How about the Australian suffragist who shook  up an empire? Visit the link. Historians are meeting in Amsterdam later this month to discuss how the digital revolution is shaping the study and presentation of history. Follow what’s happening with suffrage centennials around the nation on SuffrageCentennials.com

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Podcast #5: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris StevensAudio Podcast #5. “Playing Politics with the President.” The fifth podcast in the series.

This next audio podcast of two minutes showcases the determination of the suffragists in 1913. In this segment, the women are on their fifth deputation to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson to appeal for his support in the ongoing campaign for votes for women.

They pulled strings to put together a deputation where the President couldn’t refuse their ongoing appeal. Their message: We will not give up! Although the writer Doris Stevens (1892-1963)  in her book, Jailed for Freedom, didn’t attend the meeting with Wilson, her commentary captures the spirit of the event. Anna Howard Shaw, by then a suffrage elder, pressed Wilson to come out for the federal amendment. He continued resisting. All of this pressure would eventually have the suffragists conclude that hard ball would be the only way to play. Audio production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M Smallheer. Photo is of Doris Stevens, author of Jailed for Freedom.

FacebookIn Podcast #4 of “Playing Politics with the President” Woodrow Wilson took a baby step. But more pressure would be necessary. When the suffragists appealed to the Democratic Party, they considered their advantages and disadvantages. “We cannot wait,” the activists said.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5 of the nine-audio podcast series.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe by email. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and video. Podcasts are great for classroom use and for special events. Stay up to date on centennial celebrations. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

VIDEO: Spirit of 1776″ wagon heads toward 2020!

VIDEO: This posting is a reminder about where the “Spirit of 1776” wagon has been and where it is headed –to 2017 and 2020 suffrage centennial celebrations.

In upcoming elections, ask ALL candidates their thoughts on how the present day is linked to the long struggle for equality and justice. Reinforce how it is critical to get behind our upcoming suffrage centennials with funding and leadership. Emphasize that we’re not satisfied with more volunteering opportunities and an endless series of bake sales.

If you’re supporting the idea of the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon on permanent exhibit, give the idea an extra boost with this video.

Music video about the “Spirit of 1776” wagon. A toe-tapping reminder of where we’ve come from and where we’re going.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with postings twice a week. Newsletters four times a year: summer, fall, winter and spring. Video, audio, news and views. Join in with conversation on the Suffrage Wagon blog.

Podcast #4: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris StevensAudio Podcast #4 of “Playing Politics with the President” takes us behind the scenes to the nitty gritty business of laying on the pressure.

In the last podcast, #3 the suffragists took their appeal to Congress in 1913. Petitions were delivered there for the first time in 26 years. The women activists thought this would be enough. “Four million women voters are watching you,” became the mantra. The Congressional representatives were polite, and the matter taken seriously at least on the surface. But it became clear voting would have to become a political issue. Wilson’s agenda of tariff and currency had been addressed. But he hadn’t taken any of his promised steps toward supporting votes for women. A delegation from Wilson’s home state, New Jersey, paid a call on the president and he promised to give the matter his “earnest attention.” But was Woodrow Wilson serious?

Find out in Podcast #4 of “Playing Politics with the President.” Doris Stevens in her book, “Jailed for Congress” notes that Woodrow Wilson took a baby step. But more pressure would be necessary. When the suffragists appealed to the Democratic Party, they considered their advantages and disadvantages. “We cannot wait,” they said.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3 of the nine-audio podcast series. The “Playing Politics with the President” audio podcast series is produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M. Smallheer. From Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom. Image: Doris Stevens.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with posts twice a week and special newsletters published in the summer, fall, winter and spring. News, views, videos, audio podcasts.

New music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” highlights the patriotic protest representative of the suffrage movement on the national, state and local levels.

Hitch up your horse and head for Seneca Falls, New York!

Edna on a horsePack your bags and hitch up your horseless carriage! Plan a fall trip to see the colorful fall leaves and put Seneca Falls, NY on your radar as the place to go this year. Sign up now for Seneca Falls Dialogues in October, find out about special programs at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park (see below). Find out about exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. And NOW for the first time: the opening of the Richard P. Hunt papers to the public. 

To celebrate Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park has opened, for research, a set of personal and business papers held by the family and private owners for more than 140 years. It’s a special event to celebrate Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. Remember that the Hunt House in Waterloo is around the corner from Seneca Falls. That’s where the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments was conceived of…over cups of hot tea with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others, including Jane C. Hunt.

The Hunt papers include a thousand separate pieces dating from 1828 to 1856.  Some examples include plans and contracts for workers’ housing, Waterloo Woolen and Cotton Mill records, letters of condolence, Richard P. Hunt, Jr.’s school essays, farm and store records. “Richard Hunt is an example of ’do everything and do it right,’” notes Ami Ghazala, park superintendent.  “Though the women’s movement was not built with bricks and mortar like his buildings in Waterloo, Richard P. Hunt, his family, and his business associates created a foundation of support that made the first Women’s Rights Convention in 1848  a success.  I invite everyone to take a look at his papers to find the man who boosted women.”

Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls.  A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf.  Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers. All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about our upcoming programs.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

 

Podcast #3: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris Stevens, author of "Jailed for Freedom"Podcast #3. This audio series places the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon smack in the middle of the Big Picture nationally.

As the wagon headed out from Manhattan to Long Island in July of 1913 over one hundred years ago, women across the nation mobilized for the vote in Washington, DC. Awareness of such a historic occasion is at an all-time low. But it doesn’t diminish the significance American women’s organization on the grassroots.That’s why we’re running this series. Take a few minutes to listen and catch up with the previous audio podcasts.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3 of the nine- audio podcast series.

The “Playing Politics with the President” audio podcast series has been produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M. Smallheer. From Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom. Image: Doris Stevens.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with posts twice a week and special newsletters published in the summer, fall, winter and spring. News, views, videos, audio podcasts. New music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” highlights the patriotic protest representative of the suffrage movement on the national, state and local levels.

Kearns archive at New York Botantical Garden for Echo Dale Gardens

Echo Dale GardensWhat happened to Wilmer and Edna Kearns and the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon after the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920? They moved from Rockville Centre, NY with daughter Serena Kearns back to Pennsylvania where their second child, Wilma, was born in November 1920.

The New York Botanical Garden  (the LuEsther T. Mertz Library) has archival materials in its collection from the business Edna and Wilmer founded, Echo Dale Gardens, located in the Philadelphia area. More items have been added recently. The Mertz Library maintains a wide scope of materials related to the nursery industry in the United States, including correspondence between nursery owners and their customers, invoices, plant inventories, sales brochures, catalogs, newspaper and magazine articles.

Edna B. Kearns and Wilmer R. Kearns’  love of plants and nature led to the establishment of Echo Dale Gardens, the nursery they owned and operated together after 1920. Wilmer and Edna were active in the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, and their prize-winning flowers and plants were displayed each year at the Philadelphia Flower Show. Local newspapers document Edna’s public speaking about gardening in the Philadelphia area. The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon was on display at the nursery for many years for the purpose of educating the public about how American women won the vote.

Their second child Wilma dressed as the little Dutch girl, the trademark for Echo Dale Gardens for special events and at the Philadelphia Flower Show. After Edna’s death in 1934, Wilmer continued operating the nursery at Echo Dale until World War II. In retirement he reopened the nursery in Ambler, PA. The overall collections at the New York Botanical Garden library also include plant information guides, nursery catalogs, exhibition guides, and other materials.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the movement, as well as the life and times of Edna Kearns, Wilmer Kearns, and the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon.

Podcast #2: “Playing Politics with the President”

Woodrow WilsonThis second audio podcast of “Playing Politics with the President” is a provocative look at the determination of women to press the issue of their rights in 1913. I love the description of the first deputation to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson –and then the second and the third. We’re not hearing this account from people a hundred years after the fact. We’re fortunate to be able to  hear Doris Steven’s own words published in 1920 in “Jailed for Freedom.”

Podcast #2. “Playing Politics with the President”

I loved the description of the womens’ reaction to being led into President Wilson’s office and being asked to sit in rows of chairs, like a school room, with the Woodrow Wilson’s chair in front. Everyone in the women’s delegation admitted to being frightened by the formality. And Alice Paul’s questioning of the President is classic. No one would accept Wilson’s excuses. The women’s reactions are enough to bring a smile of support to our faces today. Essentially he told the women of the delegation that he had more important things to do besides caring about their rights. After suffragists gathered petitions from around the nation, they presented them to Congress and the Susan B. Anthony amendment was introduced, but the battle wasn’t over yet.

This audio podcast series is great if you have two minutes to get a sense of what it took for American women to win the vote. Last week we featured Podcast #1. Take some time each weekend to relax to listen and add to your awareness of the continuing drama of “Playing Politics with the President.” We’ll be sharing a new audio podcast in the series every weekend. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivix.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

Find out about the Seneca Falls Dialogues in Seneca Falls, NY in October at LetsRockTheCradle.com Registrations are possible now. Fall is a great time to travel. Imagine the colorful landscape and all that you can see in the vicinity of Seneca Falls, New York. Also, check with LetsRockTheCradle.com for other travel ideas when you’re in the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

 

“Sister in Struggle”: Get to know suffragist Elizabeth Freeman

Elizabeth FreemanA great article about suffragist Elizabeth Freeman is the cover story in a recent issue of Pasadena Weekly. Their angle: Elisabeth died there, and the editorial staff was particularly interested in Elisabeth’s contribution to the anti-lynching campaign of 1916. They made a link between Elisabeth’s work and the Michael Brown case in Missouri today, welcome coverage because it illustrates the extent to which many Votes for Women activists had more than one concern, reminiscent of the early women’s rights activists involved in abolition and temperance. Elisabeth receives more attention these days for her activism in the suffrage movement, so this is a welcome addition to what’s available about her life and work. PDF of the Pasadena Weekly article.

See the great web site on Elisabeth Freeman produced by Elisabeth’s great niece Margaret Johnston of Binghamton, NY. Also. “Long Island’s Three Wagon Women” in the New York History blog.

Marguerite's MusingsI’ve been aware of Elizabeth Freeman going back years when I first heard stories about “Great Aunt Elisabeth” from my friend Jane Van De Bogart, a member of the Woodstock town board back when I lived in Woodstock, NY and prowled around local issues with my pen, pad and camera for Woodstock Times. I don’t remember if Jane mentioned her great aunt first or if I trotted out my grandmother Edna Kearns. In any event, one thing led to another.

Two people with family members who’d been suffragists in NYS would sooner or later insist on details and that’s how I found out that not only did Edna and Elizabeth know each other, but they worked together with Rosalie Jones on Long Island on women’s suffrage organizing. As Grandmother Edna Kearns was a Long Island wagon woman, so was Elisabeth Freeman who organized women from diverse backgrounds. Elisabeth also marched with Rosalie Jones to the 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, DC –hardy souls who hiked through bad weather to prove their point.

In 1986 the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon became part of an exhibit about Elisabeth and Edna in Kingston, NY with a seed grant from the NYS Council on the Arts. Jone Miller and the Floating Foundation of Photography in High Falls, NY organized the exhibit which got me started on the long road to bring this part of American history to the attention of a broader audience. Several programs at SUNY New Paltz for Women’s History Month even involved our mothers.

Pick up a rock these days and you’ll find a descendant of a suffrage activist. That’s why I love Elisabeth Freeman. Peg Johnston has picked up the torch from her great aunt and is carrying it high these days. The general public may know about the suffrage movement nationally, but we find out much more by touching into the lives of individuals like Elisabeth, as well as the records and news coverage of clubs and associations on the local level that kept the suffrage issue alive for years. The existence of these organizations, and their ongoing events and activities, gave backbone to the national movement. Leaders at the top can’t do anything without support on the grassroots.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

We have an ongoing podcast series: “Playing Politics with the President” that features the work of the National Woman’s Party right at the time of Elisabeth Freeman’s work. Podcast #1. You can listen to the next podcast in the series, #2, this coming weekend.

Audio podcast #1: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris StevensWe’re jumping forward to 1913 and following along with Doris Stevens in the audio podcast series, “Playing Politics with the President.” Stevens was an eyewitness to the suffrage movement and we’re fortunate to have the Librivox recording of “Jailed for Freedom” to slice into digestible audio bits of two minutes or less.

Podcast #1 starts with the story about U.S. President Woodrow Wilson arriving at the train station in Washington, DC in March of 1913 and asking “Where are the people?” after noticing that the station is virtually empty. The answer: ” On the avenue watching the suffragists parade” came the answer from an aide. Did it really happen this way? Suffrage activist Doris Stevens certainly wasn’t in the train station in the loop with Woodrow Wilson, but she was around long enough to fill an entire book about the suffrage movement and her perspective on it. “Jailed for Freedom” is a terrific basic text when discovering the suffrage movement. It’s also a quick and easy homework assignment for students.

So test the first podcast of the series. Just two minutes as you settle down with the audio and mark on your calendar that “Playing Politics with the President” is a nine-part series. It features access to the series of events that led up to the eventual decision by the National Woman’s Party to picket the White House to make the point of American women were determined to vote. YouTube has video selections from “Iron Jawed Angels” that features this same time period leading up to an increasing confrontation with President Woodrow Wilson. The YouTube selections will also be featured on Suffrage Wagon in the future. You’ll find these small audio chunks enjoyable and very informative. Photo of suffragist Doris Stevens, above.

New Podcast: “Playing Politics with the President.”

IN OTHER NEWS: There’s a tea house in Castle Rock, Colorado –the Regency Tea Room– that has a great article worth taking a look.  This posting makes the connection between the suffrage movement and tea houses, a subject we’ve given plenty of attention to over the past few years. Castle Rock is 28 miles from downtown Denver and 37 miles north of Colorado Springs.  It’s by reservation only. I haven’t been there, but it’s on my list.

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Bernice Ende rides into Rochester, NY to celebrate Montana’s suffrage centennial!

BERNICE_ENDE_postcard-4inx6in-h-back-e1396255951920-688x1024Bernice Ende rode into Rochester, NY yesterday and stopped at the Susan B. Anthony House. She’s off on a two-year plus journey from the east to the west coast. Along the way she’s presenting a slide show that’s inspired, in part, by Montana’s suffrage centennial in 2014.

Escorted into the city by mounted police, Bernice visited the Mt. Hope Cemetery to see the graves of Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass, and her next stop: the Susan B. Anthony House. She’s getting a great deal of attention, and this is good news for those of us working to bring the past into the present day. Check out her web site. “Let us never forget the women who gave their lives to bring us liberty,” is the message Bernice is carrying. Safe journeys!

IN OTHER NEWS: Being born a girl means you are more likely to be subjected to violence, disease, poverty and disadvantage than any other group on Earth. In the documentary film, ” I am a girl,” we meet 14-year-old Kimsey from Cambodia who’s forced to sell her virginity at 12; Aziza from Afghanistan, who will be shot if she goes to school; Breani, a teen living in a ghetto of NYC and dreaming of stardom; Katie from Australia who’s recovering from a suicide attempt; Habiba from Cameroon, betrothed to a man 20 years her senior; and Manu from Papua New Guinea, about to become a mother at 14 following her first sexual encounter. As they come of age in the way their culture dictates, we see remarkable heart-warming stories of resilience, bravery and humor. Nominated for four Australian Academy Awards including Best Documentary and Best Director, this inspirational feature-length documentary paints a clear picture of the reality of what it means to be a girl in the 21st century.

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VIDEO: The “Spirit of 1776” launched its 1913 journey with letters

Marguerite's MusingsThe new music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” has a companion video about the history of the wagon and its role in suffrage grassroots organizing. It covers the weeks leading up to the first journey of the “Spirit of 1776” wagon on July 1, 1913.

The video featuring archival evidence of the wagon’s history showcases letters from A.F. Wilson, president of the I.S. Remson wagon company in Brooklyn to the New York State Woman Suffrage Association that had offices in Manhattan. Remson claimed to be New York’s largest wagon company specializing in fine carriages, business grocer and express wagons, blankets, robes, whips, boots, and horse furnishing goods.

Though the company had been in business since 1881, automobiles had already taken a chuck out of the wagon business. And I.S. Remson company was badly in need of some fresh advertising. So a letter to Harriet May Mills, president of the New York State Woman Suffrage Association in Manhattan, from A.F. Wilson, the Remson president, tested the possibility. Would the suffragists like a horse-drawn wagon for campaign purposes?  Mills said “yes,” and suggested that Edna Kearns of Rockville Center, New York use it in an upcoming organizing tour of Long Island by suffrage movement activists.

Video about The “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon in 1913.

The series of letters that followed between A.F. Wilson and Kearns dealt with details such as a horse, maintenance, storage and so on. In the early days the Remson company claimed that the wagon had been built in 1776 by a Revolutionary patriot; word to this effect were painted on the side of the wagon. Over the years those claims (still faintly seen) were removed, leaving only the wagon’s name, the “Spirit of 1776.” Although the American Revolution theme worked well for the suffragists, historians and scholars have determined that the wagon actually had been built around 1820. The suffrage movement activists inherited the wagon’s history and name from I.S. Remson who heard this legend from sources on Long Island.

Though the name came with the wagon, the suffrage movement also used the theme of the “Spirit of 1776” that dates back to the 1848 women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, NY: the unfinished American Revolution.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with email, Facebook and Twitter, your source for the 19th amendment and other stories. Pass on these videos to any and all interested in suffrage centennial celebrations. The column, “Marguerite’s Musings,” by Marguerite Kearns is a regular feature of Suffrage Wagon News Channel, publishing online since 2009.

Suffrage movement brawl involves Andrew Cuomo campaigner in race for governor

Marguerite's Musings: by Marguerite Kearns

It’s amazing that references to the “suffrage movement” have surfaced in New York’s election campaign for governor?  Not by the incumbent Democratic candidate Andrew Cuomo himself, but a verbal brawl in the media between Christine Quinn ( Cuomo supporter) and Tim Wu (running on the Working Families Party line for lt. gov., with Zephyr Teachout for governor). The topic of the suffrage movement flared at a rally at City Hall in New York sponsored by the Women’s Equality Party in mid August 2014.

Sherlocks like me scan the internet for any and all references to the suffrage movement. Did the suffragists create a “little movement” from 1848 to 1920 as Tim Wu suggested? Did the remark offend the “legacy of Susan B. Anthony” as Christine Quinn, campaigner for Cuomo, insisted? Did Wu’s response get him off the hook with his retort that the suffrage movement had been “amazing”? Find out for yourself. PDF.

 The new music video, the “Spirit of 1776” is out, circulating, and delivering the news of this important symbol of the suffrage movement –the unfinished American Revolution. And this means more chipping away at bringing upcoming suffrage centennials to the attention of a broader public. See article in the New York History blog. Eighty Bug is the songwriter and performer who pulled out her magic wand and the music video miracle manifested. Share the “Spirit of 1776” music video with others! There’s an audio version too. The words and chords are great for sing alongs and for use in classrooms.

And check out this short video about the significance of NYS’s 2017 suffrage centennial.

So far, nine states have celebrated their centennials of women winning voting rights prior to 1920: Wyoming (1890), Colorado (1893), Utah (1896), Idaho (1896), Washington (1910), California (1911), Arizona (1912), Kansas and Oregon (1912). Montana and Nevada are observing one hundred years of women voting in 2014 with special events, projects and activities. New York’s suffrage centennial celebration is scheduled for 2017, with Michigan, Oklahoma and South Dakota to follow. 

Will New York State get its act together and engage in some substantial long-term planning for a suffrage centennial celebration in 2017? Some NYS stakeholders are on the phone monthly to discuss centennial event possibilities, but hardly a peep yet from the state Capitol in terms of appropriate funding and an official endorsement. Some observers predict that New York’s 2017 suffrage centennial will turn out to be little more than expanded opportunities for women to hold bake sales and volunteer. Can NYS pull off a celebration consistent with its position of being the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States? Follow the Suffrage Wagon and a web site called Suffrage Centennials.

And stay tuned! This week the National Archives and the Sewall-Belmont House in Washington, DC hosted a streaming online discussion about the upcoming national suffrage centennial in 2020. There is significant movement with certain proposed projects that are in the planning stages in New York. It’s still too early to tell which proposals will stick to the wall. So we’ll be covering the upcoming 2017 New York State suffrage centennial celebration, as well as each and every development along the way.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon to stay current. Watch the new wagon video. And don’t forget to imagine the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage campaign wagon that inspired this web site on permanent exhibit at the New York State Museum for 2017 and 2020! Recent attention to “Spirit of 1776” on WAMC public radio.

Subscribe to the quarterly newsletter of Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Check in with the magazine platform. Follow the musings of Marguerite Kearns, a regular Suffrage Wagon column. And sign up for email, Twitter, Facebook updates, and the quarterly newsletter. Suffrage Wagon News Channel is celebrating its 5th year of publishing in 2014.


NEW VIDEO: “Spirit of 1776” for Women’s Equality Day!

Songwriter and performer Eighty Bug

This new music video has people talking. Now you can get in on the act by watching the “Spirit of 1776” on YouTube. Songwriter and performer Eighty Bugg assembled quite a remarkable group of musicians, stage hands, filmmakers, and living history staff at the Heritage Museum of Orange County in Santa Ana, California.

It’s a fabulous production inspired by the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon. The music video was produced by performer and songwriter Eighty Bug; directors Edwin Carungay and Lesha Maria Rodriguez; art director Jon Lagda; and the Suffragist Sisters featuring Eighty (banjolele and vocals), her sister Savannah Creech (ukulele and vocals), Ashli Lee Christoval (ukelele and vocals), Laura Guaico (tub bass), and Lisa Lui (violin), in addition to Max McVetty (percussion), and the Integral JRAT (guitar, mixing and mastering). The Heritage Museum of Orange County in Santa Ana, California provided the sets and production support.

“We’re recognizing the efforts of our ancestors by creating an anthem for women everywhere to learn and sing together,” said Eighty Bug who composed and arranged the video’s lyrics and music. Her musical career has included performances in a variety of styles, including pop, hip hop, soul, R&B, rock, country, electronica, down tempo, and dance music. She continued: “Just as Americans fought for freedom from tyranny in 1776 and suffrage activists organized for equality starting in 1848 at Seneca Falls, NY, we must continue to support our sisters today in the Middle East, India, Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, as well as throughout the world who struggle for freedom today.”

The music video pays tribute to suffragist Edna Kearns and others who hitched a horse to the “Spirit of 1776” wagon and wore colonial dress to make the connection between the American Revolution and the unfinished social revolution that left out women. Kearns’ work symbolizes the combined efforts of tens of thousands of activists across the nation who over a 72-year period participated in the U.S. women’s suffrage movement. They worked in local and state campaigns as well as in the final push to win passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

For only the audio, the “Spirit of 1776”:

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Envision a NYS suffrage centennial celebration in 2017

Fireworks. Photo: Tom Walsh.The first stage is the dream, and then comes the planning and reality of a New York State suffrage centennial celebration in 2017. The facts are being collected and the dreamers called into action. Every month I’m on a conference call with others who are stepping up to the plate in terms of making sure that New  York State celebrates its 2017 suffrage centennial, and by this, I mean, big time. There’s a great deal to celebrate, and of course, in 2017 I’ll pull out the stops in terms of telling suffrage tales of old. If you’re interested in working on a suffrage centennial ad hoc committee, let me know at suffragewagon at gmail dot com.

Watch a short video with the comments of two 2017 suffrage centennial enthusiasts, Teri Gay and Antonia Petrash, who share their visions of how exciting such a 2017 NYS observance will be.

Video: “Thoughts about a New York State 2017 suffrage centennial.”

Often I hear people ask: “What’s the point of voting if the system’s stacked against us?” A bright spot on the horizon is The Center for Voting and Democracy. Celebrating how the vote was won translates into protecting the right, in spite of where one falls on the political spectrum. From the web site: “FairVote advances systemic electoral reform to achieve a fully participatory and truly representative democracy that respects every vote and every voice in every election. We work toward these goals by providing advocates with innovative research and strategic advocacy.” Sign up for email updates and get an overview of the nation.

Fresh corn is available right now at groceries and farmers’ markets. Choose the unhusked variety and check with Suffrage Wagon Cooking School in terms of preparing it, whether inside or outside, for juicy mouth-watering servings. It’s all in memory of Grandmother Edna Kearns who cooked and canned as a fundraiser for the suffrage movement.

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Two audio podcasts about August 26th, Women’s Equality Day

Have you ever heard the Joint Resolution of Congress that in 1971 designated August 26th as Women’s Equality Day?

The first audio podcast read by Amelia Bowen spells out the directive.

And the second podcast celebrates August 26th in song.

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Dress up like Susan B. Anthony, have fun at her festival this weekend, and other news notes

Susan B. Anthony dressupsSusan B. Anthony FestivalIf you love dress ups, and costume balls, then you’ll find lots of ideas on this blog about taking back Halloween. There’s also  step by step instruction about how you can look like Susan for your next suffrage-related costume party or event. You’ll join other notables including the Susan B. Anthony House & Museum’s Susan B. Anthony in residence, Barbara Blaisdell, who has been playing the part of suffragist Susan for more than 20 years.

There’s a good chance that Barbara Blaisdell will be among the participants in the 2014 Susan B. Anthony Festival scheduled to take place on Sunday, August 17, from noon to 5 pm in the Susan B. Anthony Park between Madison and King Streets in Rochester, NY. The occasion is the celebration of August 26th, Women’s Equality Day. There will be live music, entertainment, and walking tours of the Historic Preservation District. Tours of the Anthony House are also available. The event is presented by the Susan B. Anthony Neighborhood Association and the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House. For more information. 

As August 26th approaches, plan to observe Women’s Equality Day with your friends, family or organization. Posts, videos, audio podcasts are available as resources through Suffrage Wagon News Channel, as well as the National Women’s History Project. Take advantage of a brochure you can hand out to interested people and guests. And don’t forget to follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. Sign up TODAY for email posts, Twitter and Facebook. 

Last and final audio podcast: #7 of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonThe response to the seven-series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” has been terrific. In this final segment, Podcast #7, Elizabeth Cady Stanton discusses three women friends in Seneca Falls, New York, her neighbors, and some of the problems facing women in family life.

This entire series of podcasts about the suffrage movement averages two minutes each, and it’s a handy resource when sharing the words of the suffrage activists themselves that bring them from the past into the present day.

 

VIDEO: Roast corn from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

CornMelonsROAST CORN VIDEO: Seasonal special from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. Inspired by Grandmother Edna Kearns who canned corn, jams and jellies to raise funds for the suffrage movement.

Are you planning to do something special on August 26th, Women’s Equality Day? Resources from the National Women’s History Project. The NWHP also has a brochure for August 26th that can be downloaded to your computer and printed out. Do you subscribe by email to the NWHP? It’s a great resource.

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Podcast #6, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonOnly one more podcast to go after this one!

Podcast #6. Elizabeth Cady Stanton speaks about how the Seneca Falls convention didn’t end in July of 1848. The convention defenders had to defend their position on women’s rights and this meant educating themselves about hefty subjects including law and philosophy. These early suffragists initiated a study group in Seneca Falls (along the lines of Margaret Fuller) and many townspeople participated.

The short audio segments are between two and three minutes in the podcast series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” One click away from the first five audio podcasts of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” Podcasts #1 through #6.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for other features like this one. Audio by Librivox.

Get ready for Women’s Equality Day, plus more: Suffrage Wagon News Notes

NewsNotesSWNCHave you set plans in motion to celebrate August 26th, Women’s Equality Day? Fun gifts and other products available to inform your event are available from the National Women’s History Project.

Are you following the audio podcasts from Seneca Falls? Five of the total series of seven podcasts, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls,” have been published. If you haven’t had a chance to hear the words of Elizabeth Cady Stanton reflect on the 1848 women’s rights convention, here’s your chance. Podcasts #1. #2. #3 #4 #5 . Watch for the remaining two podcasts, coming soon.

On Tuesday, August 26, at 7 p.m. at the William G. McGowan Theater in Washington, DC there will be a special program, Women’s History on the Horizon: The Centennial of Woman Suffrage in 2020. In commemoration of Women’s Equality Day and the 94th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, this discussion considers how nearly one hundred years of voting rights have impacted present-day political, social, and economic roles for women. Presented in partnership with the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum.

The updates on the Harriet Tubman national park include a video and several articles for background. Video from LetsRockTheCradle.com

Make your voice heard on the proposed Tubman national park!

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Podcast #5: After the convention… “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” with Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady StantonPodcast #5: After the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, the fire was lit for discontent in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. Ministers criticized the convention from the pulpit and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others wrote letters to the editors of newspapers defending their actions; they accepted invitations for speaking publicly, and more. Audio: Librivox. A production of Suffrage Wagon News Channel. This seven-podcast audio series is from “Eighty Years and More,” Stanton’s memoir that has been divided up into short segments of approximately two minutes each in order for more people to familiarize themselves with Elizabeth Cady Stanton from her perspective at this pivotal time in history.

Don’t forget to contact your rep in the U.S. House of Representatives to register your support for the Harriet Tubman national park project…act now before Congress closes its doors for the summer recess.

To stay in touch, follow the Suffrage Wagon.

Video: Harriet Tubman national park alert… Will Congress pass bill before the summer recess?

Image from "Puck"The U.S. Senate has passed legislation to bring the nation one step closer to a Harriet Tubman national park. Now the bill is before the U.S. House of Representatives. Will the House pass the bill before the summer recess? Or is the bill doomed because of politics?

Treat yourself to a Video about the Harriet Tubman national park proposal. Tubman is best known for the Underground Railroad and antislavery work. She was also involved in the suffrage movement.

Link to action steps that you can take.

Tell the U.S. Congress to Fund the Harriet Tubman National Park.

ACT NOW! The Tubman bill has 101 sponsors in the House; it passed the U.S. Senate in July 2014. Tubman national park legislation has been kicking around for ages, and commentators have been wondering if politics will stall action on this bipartisan bill before the Congressional summer recess that starts in August. See article in the Auburn, NY newspaper that poses the question. Background: Article about the Tubman bill passing the U.S. Senate in July. Article about Harriet Tubman descendant.

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“Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”: Podcast #4 by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady StantonPodcast #4. If Elizabeth Cady Stanton had known in advance about the public reaction to the 1848 women’s rights convention,  she might not have had the courage to set events in motion. But once over, she notes that conventions like the one in Seneca Falls happened all over New York State. Listen to Stanton herself continue telling the story in the fourth installment of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.”

Today is the last day of “Convention Days” in Seneca Falls, the annual event that highlights the significance of the Seneca Falls convention and attracts visitors to the town. This year’s innovative programming will, no doubt, bring more attention than ever to the festivities. The town is decked out and ready for the extra traffic in town. These podcast selections are from Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s memoir, “Eighty Years and More.” Audio, Librivox. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

The plot thickens…Podcast #3: “Trouble in Seneca Falls”

The plot thickens as the town of Seneca Falls, New York prepares for its big celebration this weekend with Convention Days 2014 where the entire community will be decked out for the festivities. Meanwhile, here’s Podcast #3 where Elizabeth Cady Stanton collaborates with four other women to plan the convention and some of the participants have second thoughts. It appeared, at first, that the 1848 women’s rights convention might be a failure. Watch for the ongoing story of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” Audio, Librivox. A production of Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

Hear Cady-Stanton’s own words:

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Podcast #2: “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonPodcast #2: “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.”

Podcast #2 of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” highlights the unrest and discontent stirring and how an invitation from Lucretia Mott to share tea one afternoon unleashed a shared frustration among a small group of women that resulted in action. We’re well served by hearing Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s own words.

The Finger Lakes region deserves its reputation as an emerging tourist destination for visitors headed toward the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the U.S.  But don’t get the idea that the “Cradle” is a Disneyland. Visitors to the national park headquarters in Seneca Falls might wonder why Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s home is short of furniture and why the park services aren’t available seven days a week. Welcome to the underfunded frontier. You’ll need imagination and the ability to look below the surface to see what’s really there.

Places of interest in the area of Seneca Falls, NY include the national park, the hall of fame, and special programs such as the Seneca Falls Dialogue and Convention Days. Extend your trip to the Matilda Joslyn Gage Center in Fayetteville, NY; the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House in Rochester; the 1816 Quaker meetinghouse in Farmington; the childhood home of Elizabeth Cady Stanton in Johnstown; the Howland Stone Store Museum in Aurora, the Harriet Tubman historic site in Auburn, plus much more.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. Watch for the remaining installments of the podcast series, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” Check out the summer issue of Suffrage Wagon‘s quarterly newsletter.

“Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”: New podcast series plus Convention Days!

Street sign in Seneca Falls, NYA seven-podcast series called “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” describes the atmosphere in the area leading up to the 1848 women’s rights convention.

If you’ve ever have thought about attending Convention Days in the town of Seneca Falls, NY… the July 18-20, 2014 weekend is the right time to do it.

Meet Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her descendants; kayak the First Annual Convention Paddle; have your head read by a phrenologist; hear speakers Nadia Shahram and Daisy Kahn; tour Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s home; march in the Women’s Rights procession; tour local museums; attend dinners, receptions, films, and the Side Walk Festival. Check out the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls as well. The town is located in the “cradle” of the women’s rights movement in New York State. It’s considered the historic gateway to the Finger Lakes. Official schedule for Convention Days 2014.

Visiting Seneca Falls  requires an engagement with story, even before you get there, so it’s great timing to find out about the context of the times as it was back in the 1840s.

PODCAST #1: “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” This short audio file features Elizabeth Cady Stanton speaking about what it was like to arrive in Seneca Falls prior to 1848. This is the first podcast of a series of seven from “Eighty Years and More” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Audio by Librivox. A Suffrage Wagon News Channel special.

Don’t set out for Seneca Falls without checking on times that the Women’s Rights National Historic Park will be open.  The park’s visitors center is open often, but not daily. Special ranger programs feature information about the 1848 women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls. Information about house tours are available at the park’s web site.

Video about visiting Seneca Falls, New York that features several local historical sites and images from the national park visitors’ center. On the weekend of July 18-20, 2014 a group of Muslim women will make history in Seneca Falls by announcing a “Declaration of the Equities for Muslim Women” that’s part of the Convention Days 2014 program. A national tour team launched a national women’s economic agenda in Seneca Falls on June 1st, an initiative organized by Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and honoring the groundbreaking 1848 women’s rights convention.

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Videos on what you’re missing if you can’t visit Seneca Falls, NY this summer

Image from "Puck"

 

 

BELOW:

New video featuring the highlights of Seneca Falls, New York –the birthplace of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

BELOW: Video highlighting the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments read at the first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon that from now through July 20th will highlight Seneca Falls, New York and the annual events there commemorating this important occasion in American history.

Happy Fourth of July! Enjoy little-known story of how suffrage activists crashed a national centennial celebration!

Fourth of July 1876HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY:

The Suffrage Wagon summer newsletter is on the stands. It spells out what happened on the Fourth of July in 1876 when five suffrage activists crashed the national centennial celebration in Philadelphia… a little-known story that’s also an important part of our national history.

See link and forward to the people on your social media list as a way to deepen the appreciation of our past and how it links to our present. Link to story. The story involves Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Phoebe W. Couzins, Sara Andrews Spencer, and Lillie Devereux Blake. There’s even an audio podcast where the event’s described by Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

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