“Why I support the suffragist memorial” on Day #14 of the first “Night of Terror” observance

Graphic for "Night of Terror"by Marguerite Kearns

One more day to go on the “Night of Terror” blogging. I wouldn’t have predicted I’d make it to the end of this two-week stretch of daily blogging. It’s all for a good reason. November 15, 1917 became a “turning point” in the 72 year struggle for American women to win the right to vote.

Some people claim other turning points, like the March 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, DC, and the death of Votes for Women martyr Inez Milholland in 2016. But all these dates are related. It could be said they’re companion turning points culminating in the 1920 ratification of the 19th amendment. This is what the 2020 votes for women centennial will be all about…the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. And oh, won’t it be great if the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is completed on or before this suffrage centennial celebration. Follow news about suffrage centennials on email or Twitter.

This is why I urge you to join me in supporting the proposed suffragist memorial in Lorton, Virginia. The Washington, DC suffrage parade in 1913, followed by Inez Milholland’s death in 1916, directly led to the decision to picket the White House, and that became pivotal. Of course the unfinished American Revolution for women’s rights continues today. But that’s another story.

If there’s an enormous monument for Martin Luther King in the nation’s capitol, it makes sense for there to be a suffragist memorial not far away in Lorton, VA. Both monuments –the suffragist and civil rights monuments– acknowledge important parts of American history. If we believe in equality and justice for all, it’s important to affirm ALL manifestations of attempts to complete the American Revolution. We have a great deal to do: support our Mother Earth, achieve freedom and equality for everyone, plus much more. One piece of legislation –the 19th Amendment– expanded rights for more Americans than ever before and since. This at least deserves a memorial, don’t you think?

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9), Day #10 , (Nov. 10), Day #11,  (Nov. 11), Day #12 (Nov. 12), Day #13 (Nov. 13).

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4 responses to ““Why I support the suffragist memorial” on Day #14 of the first “Night of Terror” observance

  1. Hi Marguerite,

    I agree all the events you list are important, and I would like to add to them the successful suffrage referendum campaign in New York State in 1917. Probably the most important individuals involved were Harriot Stanton Blatch and Carrie Chapman Catt. Undoubtedly much credit should also go to your grandmother Edna Kearns.

    • You’re absolutely right about the 1917 suffrage referendum that passed in New York. People put their hearts and souls into that campaign and it must have been uplifting for those in Washington, DC who found themselves at the Occoquan Workhouse. Next year, 2015, is the centennial of the 1915 NYS referendum campaign, and I plan to give it plenty of attention. Edna Kearns, for example, started campaigning in January 1915 and didn’t stop all year long. Just because the referendum didn’t pass that first round in 1915 doesn’t mean it isn’t worthy of celebration.

  2. Harriot Stanton Blatch and Carrie Chapman Catt are new names for me.

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