Tag Archives: women voters

Podcast #6: “Playing Politics with the President”

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Audio Podcast #6: In the story background of this audio series, many suffrage activists played a waiting game with U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. First, they decided to use each and every opportunity to work through the political system. Once everything else has been tried with no substantial results, they understood the necessity to move to another level.

This audio podcast gives the overview and background which means you’ll have to be patient sitting through a two-minute explanation of the view that persistence and determination will pay off… eventually. The tale is from real life. A waiting game. No car chases. Just the nuts and bolts of what it took over time for women to win the vote in the United States. Listen to this sixth podcast in the series about the long campaign in “Playing Politics with the President.”

The piece starts out by discussing the suffrage association’s annual budget spent on lobbying for an amendment to the Constitution in the context of suffragist Alice Paul’s leadership and organizing. If this is the first time you’ve checked into this audio series, you might be scratching your head and wondering what this is all about. The story: suffrage movement strategy is shifting from a state to a national strategy to win the vote. Soon in the chronology they’ll be considering a bolder and more direct approach. There are some nuggets of factual gold to be found in this descriptive swamp of Washington, DC politics.

SUMMARY SO FAR: “Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6 of the nine-audio podcast series. The content is from Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom, 1921. Audio production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

VIDEO COMING SOON: Traditional English scones from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. It’s a great idea when planning your next social gathering or fundraiser to invite friends, family, or for your organization.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Suffragette graphic novel and Votes for Women a la fashion!

Sally Heathcote, SuffragetteThis week’s release of the new graphic novel, Sally Heathcote: Suffragette and Chanel’s version of a Votes for Women parade are headliners this week. Audio Podcast #5 of the series “Playing Politics with the President” will be postponed until Thursday.

We’re pushing everything aside to talk about the release of the suffrage movement graphic novel, Sally Heathcote: Suffragette. I haven’t seen it yet, but the YouTube video from the UK gives an overview. So take a look at the video.

Meanwhile, CHANEL staged a commercial suffrage movement mock protest when it showcased its Spring/Summer 2015 line in late September. The suffragists in their day may have had fashion on their minds, though they wouldn’t have approved of the short skirts and stripes that look great only on women with rail-like figures. But they say that all publicity is good publicity! The word is getting out about a movement that was revolutionary in its day, and it’s inspiring us now! The reminders of this great movement are arriving in packages we might not have expected: fashion and graphic novel.

CHANEL fashion line

Handy links about the new graphic novel release: Author Mary Talbott’s web site. NPR review of the suffrage graphic novel. Book review from the Guardian.

Facebook

Follow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe by email. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and video. Take a few minutes later this week for Podcast #5 of the ongoing audio series, “Playing Politics with the President.” It’s a focus on 1913 and the brute persistence of those activists who refused to take “no” for an answer.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon and put yourself in the driver’s seat by subscribing to SuffrageCentennials.com

 

Podcast #4: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris StevensAudio Podcast #4 of “Playing Politics with the President” takes us behind the scenes to the nitty gritty business of laying on the pressure.

In the last podcast, #3 the suffragists took their appeal to Congress in 1913. Petitions were delivered there for the first time in 26 years. The women activists thought this would be enough. “Four million women voters are watching you,” became the mantra. The Congressional representatives were polite, and the matter taken seriously at least on the surface. But it became clear voting would have to become a political issue. Wilson’s agenda of tariff and currency had been addressed. But he hadn’t taken any of his promised steps toward supporting votes for women. A delegation from Wilson’s home state, New Jersey, paid a call on the president and he promised to give the matter his “earnest attention.” But was Woodrow Wilson serious?

Find out in Podcast #4 of “Playing Politics with the President.” Doris Stevens in her book, “Jailed for Congress” notes that Woodrow Wilson took a baby step. But more pressure would be necessary. When the suffragists appealed to the Democratic Party, they considered their advantages and disadvantages. “We cannot wait,” they said.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3 of the nine-audio podcast series. The “Playing Politics with the President” audio podcast series is produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M. Smallheer. From Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom. Image: Doris Stevens.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with posts twice a week and special newsletters published in the summer, fall, winter and spring. News, views, videos, audio podcasts.

New music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” highlights the patriotic protest representative of the suffrage movement on the national, state and local levels.

National Voter Registration Day: Pass it on!

NationalVoterRegistrationDayFor more information.

 

Podcast #3: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris Stevens, author of "Jailed for Freedom"Podcast #3. This audio series places the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon smack in the middle of the Big Picture nationally.

As the wagon headed out from Manhattan to Long Island in July of 1913 over one hundred years ago, women across the nation mobilized for the vote in Washington, DC. Awareness of such a historic occasion is at an all-time low. But it doesn’t diminish the significance American women’s organization on the grassroots.That’s why we’re running this series. Take a few minutes to listen and catch up with the previous audio podcasts.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3 of the nine- audio podcast series.

The “Playing Politics with the President” audio podcast series has been produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M. Smallheer. From Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom. Image: Doris Stevens.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with posts twice a week and special newsletters published in the summer, fall, winter and spring. News, views, videos, audio podcasts. New music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” highlights the patriotic protest representative of the suffrage movement on the national, state and local levels.

VIDEO: The “Spirit of 1776″ launched its 1913 journey with letters

Marguerite's MusingsThe new music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” has a companion video about the history of the wagon and its role in suffrage grassroots organizing. It covers the weeks leading up to the first journey of the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon on July 1, 1913.

The video featuring archival evidence of the wagon’s history showcases letters from A.F. Wilson, president of the I.S. Remson wagon company in Brooklyn to the New York State Woman Suffrage Association that had offices in Manhattan. Remson claimed to be New York’s largest wagon company specializing in fine carriages, business grocer and express wagons, blankets, robes, whips, boots, and horse furnishing goods.

Though the company had been in business since 1881, automobiles had already taken a chuck out of the wagon business. And I.S. Remson company was badly in need of some fresh advertising. So a letter to Harriet May Mills, president of the New York State Woman Suffrage Association in Manhattan, from A.F. Wilson, the Remson president, tested the possibility. Would the suffragists like a horse-drawn wagon for campaign purposes?  Mills said “yes,” and suggested that Edna Kearns of Rockville Center, New York use it in an upcoming organizing tour of Long Island by suffrage movement activists.

Video about The “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage wagon in 1913.

The series of letters that followed between A.F. Wilson and Kearns dealt with details such as a horse, maintenance, storage and so on. In the early days the Remson company claimed that the wagon had been built in 1776 by a Revolutionary patriot; word to this effect were painted on the side of the wagon. Over the years those claims (still faintly seen) were removed, leaving only the wagon’s name, the “Spirit of 1776.” Although the American Revolution theme worked well for the suffragists, historians and scholars have determined that the wagon actually had been built around 1820. The suffrage movement activists inherited the wagon’s history and name from I.S. Remson who heard this legend from sources on Long Island.

Though the name came with the wagon, the suffrage movement also used the theme of the “Spirit of 1776″ that dates back to the 1848 women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, NY: the unfinished American Revolution.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with email, Facebook and Twitter, your source for the 19th amendment and other stories. Pass on these videos to any and all interested in suffrage centennial celebrations. The column, “Marguerite’s Musings,” by Marguerite Kearns is a regular feature of Suffrage Wagon News Channel, publishing online since 2009.

Videos on what you’re missing if you can’t visit Seneca Falls, NY this summer

Image from "Puck"

 

 

BELOW:

New video featuring the highlights of Seneca Falls, New York –the birthplace of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

BELOW: Video highlighting the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments read at the first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon that from now through July 20th will highlight Seneca Falls, New York and the annual events there commemorating this important occasion in American history.