Tag Archives: Votes for Women

Podcast #5: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris StevensAudio Podcast #5. “Playing Politics with the President.” The fifth podcast in the series.

This next audio podcast of two minutes showcases the determination of the suffragists in 1913. In this segment, the women are on their fifth deputation to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson to appeal for his support in the ongoing campaign for votes for women.

They pulled strings to put together a deputation where the President couldn’t refuse their ongoing appeal. Their message: We will not give up! Although the writer Doris Stevens (1892-1963)  in her book, Jailed for Freedom, didn’t attend the meeting with Wilson, her commentary captures the spirit of the event. Anna Howard Shaw, by then a suffrage elder, pressed Wilson to come out for the federal amendment. He continued resisting. All of this pressure would eventually have the suffragists conclude that hard ball would be the only way to play. Audio production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M Smallheer. Photo is of Doris Stevens, author of Jailed for Freedom.

FacebookIn Podcast #4 of “Playing Politics with the President” Woodrow Wilson took a baby step. But more pressure would be necessary. When the suffragists appealed to the Democratic Party, they considered their advantages and disadvantages. “We cannot wait,” the activists said.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5 of the nine-audio podcast series.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe by email. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and video. Podcasts are great for classroom use and for special events. Stay up to date on centennial celebrations. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Suffragette graphic novel and Votes for Women a la fashion!

Sally Heathcote, SuffragetteThis week’s release of the new graphic novel, Sally Heathcote: Suffragette and Chanel’s version of a Votes for Women parade are headliners this week. Audio Podcast #5 of the series “Playing Politics with the President” will be postponed until Thursday.

We’re pushing everything aside to talk about the release of the suffrage movement graphic novel, Sally Heathcote: Suffragette. I haven’t seen it yet, but the YouTube video from the UK gives an overview. So take a look at the video.

Meanwhile, CHANEL staged a commercial suffrage movement mock protest when it showcased its Spring/Summer 2015 line in late September. The suffragists in their day may have had fashion on their minds, though they wouldn’t have approved of the short skirts and stripes that look great only on women with rail-like figures. But they say that all publicity is good publicity! The word is getting out about a movement that was revolutionary in its day, and it’s inspiring us now! The reminders of this great movement are arriving in packages we might not have expected: fashion and graphic novel.

CHANEL fashion line

Handy links about the new graphic novel release: Author Mary Talbott’s web site. NPR review of the suffrage graphic novel. Book review from the Guardian.

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Follow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe by email. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and video. Take a few minutes later this week for Podcast #5 of the ongoing audio series, “Playing Politics with the President.” It’s a focus on 1913 and the brute persistence of those activists who refused to take “no” for an answer.

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National Voter Registration Day: Pass it on!

NationalVoterRegistrationDayFor more information.

 

Kearns archive at New York Botantical Garden for Echo Dale Gardens

Echo Dale GardensWhat happened to Wilmer and Edna Kearns and the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage wagon after the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920? They moved from Rockville Centre, NY with daughter Serena Kearns back to Pennsylvania where their second child, Wilma, was born in November 1920.

The New York Botanical Garden  (the LuEsther T. Mertz Library) has archival materials in its collection from the business Edna and Wilmer founded, Echo Dale Gardens, located in the Philadelphia area. More items have been added recently. The Mertz Library maintains a wide scope of materials related to the nursery industry in the United States, including correspondence between nursery owners and their customers, invoices, plant inventories, sales brochures, catalogs, newspaper and magazine articles.

Edna B. Kearns and Wilmer R. Kearns’  love of plants and nature led to the establishment of Echo Dale Gardens, the nursery they owned and operated together after 1920. Wilmer and Edna were active in the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, and their prize-winning flowers and plants were displayed each year at the Philadelphia Flower Show. Local newspapers document Edna’s public speaking about gardening in the Philadelphia area. The “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon was on display at the nursery for many years for the purpose of educating the public about how American women won the vote.

Their second child Wilma dressed as the little Dutch girl, the trademark for Echo Dale Gardens for special events and at the Philadelphia Flower Show. After Edna’s death in 1934, Wilmer continued operating the nursery at Echo Dale until World War II. In retirement he reopened the nursery in Ambler, PA. The overall collections at the New York Botanical Garden library also include plant information guides, nursery catalogs, exhibition guides, and other materials.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the movement, as well as the life and times of Edna Kearns, Wilmer Kearns, and the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage wagon.

Two audio podcasts about August 26th, Women’s Equality Day

Have you ever heard the Joint Resolution of Congress that in 1971 designated August 26th as Women’s Equality Day?

The first audio podcast read by Amelia Bowen spells out the directive.

And the second podcast celebrates August 26th in song.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

 

Videos on what you’re missing if you can’t visit Seneca Falls, NY this summer

Image from "Puck"

 

 

BELOW:

New video featuring the highlights of Seneca Falls, New York –the birthplace of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

BELOW: Video highlighting the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments read at the first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon that from now through July 20th will highlight Seneca Falls, New York and the annual events there commemorating this important occasion in American history.

More about dressups and the Susan B. skit

Marguerite's Musings: Plays and dressups aren’t the big activity these days that they might have been in years past before film and TV took over the lion’s share of entertainment.

I remember how much fun it was to write a script for a play, cast the performers (usually my sister and brothers), and invite my parents to the grand production. The excitement is still there thought, all these years later, and the result is more of a flash in the pan production of Susan B. Anthony’s 1873 trial at the Ontario County Courthouse.

Years  ago I wasn’t so conscious of people’s short attention spans, so now the skit about Susan B. Anthony’s speech to the judge and her refusal to sit down in the courtroom is more about drama, principle and spirit than recreating the trial intact with vintage costumes. The key is to keep the production short and fun, yet make the point of the event’s significance.

Follow LetsRockTheCradle.com to find out about the Ontario County courthouse located in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.