Tag Archives: suffragist

Happy birthday video & audio podcast: “You are There” program in 1853

Happy 5th Birthday, Suffrage Wagon News Channel from Marguerite Kearns on Vimeo. Yes, five years of plugging along with this web site is something to brag about, or perhaps weep. In any event, it’s time to celebrate. Have fun with the birthday jingle and then…

Tune into an audio program about a suffrage convention in 1853. Be the first on your block to say you were there.

Congratulations! The National Women’s History Project will be in its 35th year in 2015. “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives” is the theme for National Women’s History Month 2015. The theme presents the opportunity to weave women’s stories – individually and collectively – into the essential fabric of our nation’s history. Join the National Women’s History Project. We’re members.  Visit the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial and follow the effort to complete a suffragist memorial on or before 2020, the votes for women centennial.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog to register your views and observations. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Tennessee governor listened to suffragist Edna Kearns’ speech in pouring rain 100 years ago!

Story of Tennessee governor listens to Edna Kearns in pouring rainby Marguerite Kearns

I heard the story about the Tennessee governor when I was young. Yes, in back in 1914 the governor of Tennessee listened to grandmother Edna Kearns’ suffrage speech in the rain. No one bothered to tell me where this happened. It could have been at Long Beach on Long Island for all I knew.

Even worse, I didn’t know enough to ask, but I got the message. The Tennessee governor was important. He listened to Edna speak. Therefore, my grandmother Edna must have been important. Not much to pass on in my storytelling, at least until 1oo years passed and the other day I delved into researching exactly what happened in November 1914.

I know nothing about what the delegates discussed at the National American Woman Suffrage Association annual conference in Tennessee where Edna served as a NYS delegate in the proceedings from November 2 to 17, 1914. But I know now that Long Island suffragist Rosalie Jones set up suffrage street speeches all over Nashville, the first time that street speaking for the suffrage cause had been tried in a Southern city. Edna Kearns put herself in the thick of the street corner action.

Marguerite's Musings with Marguerite KearnsEdna Kearns, who’d made a reputation for herself back in New York as a popular suffrage speaker, captivated the attention of the Tennessee governor, Ben W. Hooper (1870-1957). He served the state from 1911 to 1915. His administration was so controversial, documents say, that armed guards were required in the state legislature. In 1920 the State of Tennessee legislature provided the final ratification vote to bring about the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. So all of this Big Picture explanation is now viewed by me in retrospect.

It was a novelty for women to speak in pubic on Nashville, TN street corners 100 years ago. So Governor Hooper must have been fascinated to listen in the rain to a determined activist like Edna Kearns who didn’t fold up shop when the rain pelted the sidewalks. It was a big deal, just as I’d heard about as an impressionable youngster –and even more so now that I’m aware of the details. Back in New York in November 1914, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle ran a long article about the contingent of Long Island women who took Nashville by storm in November 1914. And we’re enjoying hearing about the details 100 years later.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog to register your views and observations. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Story Episode #1. A conference in Tennessee: 1914, 100 years ago

Edna Kearns 100 years ago on Suffrage Wagon News ChannelWhere was Edna Kearns 100 years ago? In Nashville, Tennessee attending a national convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. This leads to a story I heard when growing up when hearing about my grandmother Edna Kearns. Featured here is the letter Edna received informing her that she had credentials to attend as as a delegate and the conference would be from November 12th to 17th in 1914. Follow the Suffrage Wagon for what happens next. Stories will be presented in episodes. Stay tuned!

"Marguerite's Musings" by Marguerite KearnsYesterday was the last day of blogging about the suffrage activists behind bars at the Occoquan Workhouse outside of Washington, DC. That really took all my energy, but it was great fun working with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial whose work continues to raise money so the memorial can be open on or before the 2020 votes for women centennial celebration. And now I’m back to the usual schedule of twice a week for posting. And I’m adding the overview of the “Night of Terror” blog postings in the event you missed any.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9), Day #10 , (Nov. 10), Day #11,  (Nov. 11), Day #12 (Nov. 12), Day #13 (Nov. 13), Day #14 (Nov. 14), Day #15 (Nov. 15).

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog to register your views and observations. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Day #15 of the “Night of Terror” observance: Support the proposed suffragist memorial!

"Marguerite's Musings" by Marguerite Kearnsby Marguerite Kearns

The last day of the “Night of Terror” observance on Day #15 of the first annual event of raising awareness. It’s been a great experience getting to know about other visionaries who are imagining the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial being completed on or before the suffrage centennial in 2020. We’ve listened to podcasts about what happened in the Occoquan Workhouse, followed the timeline of events at the workhouse, viewed the proposed memorial from the perspective of suffrage centennials unfolding across the nation.WagonSupportsSlider Even 12-year-old Serena Kearns made a showing as the youngest Silent Sentinel on the picket line in front of the White House. Give Turning Point Suffragist Memorial the support it needs. Follow TPSM on Twitter, Facebook, and blog.

Enough information is available during this observance to keep your head spinning in terms of appreciating the many American women who came before us. A special thank you to Nancy Sargeant, Emily McCoy, and Whitney Stohr from Turning Point Suffragist Memorial for such a rich and productive working relationship during our partnership during this first annual “Night of Terror” observance. Spread the word. Follow the campaign to build a suffragist memorial. Imagine it. Work for it. Make it happen. Video about the Suffrage Wagon that continues its travels.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9), Day #10 , (Nov. 10), Day #11,  (Nov. 11), Day #12 (Nov. 12), Day #13 (Nov. 13), Day #14 (Nov. 14).

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

“Why I support the suffragist memorial” on Day #14 of the first “Night of Terror” observance

Graphic for "Night of Terror"by Marguerite Kearns

One more day to go on the “Night of Terror” blogging. I wouldn’t have predicted I’d make it to the end of this two-week stretch of daily blogging. It’s all for a good reason. November 15, 1917 became a “turning point” in the 72 year struggle for American women to win the right to vote.

Some people claim other turning points, like the March 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, DC, and the death of Votes for Women martyr Inez Milholland in 2016. But all these dates are related. It could be said they’re companion turning points culminating in the 1920 ratification of the 19th amendment. This is what the 2020 votes for women centennial will be all about…the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. And oh, won’t it be great if the Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is completed on or before this suffrage centennial celebration. Follow news about suffrage centennials on email or Twitter.

This is why I urge you to join me in supporting the proposed suffragist memorial in Lorton, Virginia. The Washington, DC suffrage parade in 1913, followed by Inez Milholland’s death in 1916, directly led to the decision to picket the White House, and that became pivotal. Of course the unfinished American Revolution for women’s rights continues today. But that’s another story.

If there’s an enormous monument for Martin Luther King in the nation’s capitol, it makes sense for there to be a suffragist memorial not far away in Lorton, VA. Both monuments –the suffragist and civil rights monuments– acknowledge important parts of American history. If we believe in equality and justice for all, it’s important to affirm ALL manifestations of attempts to complete the American Revolution. We have a great deal to do: support our Mother Earth, achieve freedom and equality for everyone, plus much more. One piece of legislation –the 19th Amendment– expanded rights for more Americans than ever before and since. This at least deserves a memorial, don’t you think?

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9), Day #10 , (Nov. 10), Day #11,  (Nov. 11), Day #12 (Nov. 12), Day #13 (Nov. 13).

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Audio podcast #1: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris StevensWe’re jumping forward to 1913 and following along with Doris Stevens in the audio podcast series, “Playing Politics with the President.” Stevens was an eyewitness to the suffrage movement and we’re fortunate to have the Librivox recording of “Jailed for Freedom” to slice into digestible audio bits of two minutes or less.

Podcast #1 starts with the story about U.S. President Woodrow Wilson arriving at the train station in Washington, DC in March of 1913 and asking “Where are the people?” after noticing that the station is virtually empty. The answer: ” On the avenue watching the suffragists parade” came the answer from an aide. Did it really happen this way? Suffrage activist Doris Stevens certainly wasn’t in the train station in the loop with Woodrow Wilson, but she was around long enough to fill an entire book about the suffrage movement and her perspective on it. “Jailed for Freedom” is a terrific basic text when discovering the suffrage movement. It’s also a quick and easy homework assignment for students.

So test the first podcast of the series. Just two minutes as you settle down with the audio and mark on your calendar that “Playing Politics with the President” is a nine-part series. It features access to the series of events that led up to the eventual decision by the National Woman’s Party to picket the White House to make the point of American women were determined to vote. YouTube has video selections from “Iron Jawed Angels” that features this same time period leading up to an increasing confrontation with President Woodrow Wilson. The YouTube selections will also be featured on Suffrage Wagon in the future. You’ll find these small audio chunks enjoyable and very informative. Photo of suffragist Doris Stevens, above.

New Podcast: “Playing Politics with the President.”

IN OTHER NEWS: There’s a tea house in Castle Rock, Colorado –the Regency Tea Room– that has a great article worth taking a look.  This posting makes the connection between the suffrage movement and tea houses, a subject we’ve given plenty of attention to over the past few years. Castle Rock is 28 miles from downtown Denver and 37 miles north of Colorado Springs.  It’s by reservation only. I haven’t been there, but it’s on my list.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

 

Musing about my Susan B. Anthony speech, plus release of new Alice Paul biography

MKmusingsI’m still working out the details of my Susan B. Anthony speech for the party commemorating the June 19th presentation Susan gave at the Ontario County, NY courthouse. The occasion: her trial for illegal voting in 1873. The courthouse is located in what’s known as the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States, not far from Rochester, New York –a great idea for historical road trips this summer.

Susan B. Anthony sure had spirit, and I wrote about it in Suffrage Wagon’s spring newsletter. After describing the upcoming party’s skit planning in the last blog posting, someone wrote in to note that Susan hadn’t actually been handcuffed. She’d held out her hands for handcuffs, but the arresting officer refused to comply before taking her downtown for booking. Many scripts are rewritten during the process. I love the feedback and need all the help I can get in this celebration of spirit.

Be forewarned, however. Susan B. Anthony’s 1873 speech isn’t for the thin skinned. Susan let loose about the injustice of second class citizenship for women. Her words are now included in lists of great American speeches. For someone like Susan B. Anthony to stand tall and give the judge hell must have taken courage and a truckload of chutzpah.

I love the potential surprises associated with Susan’s trial speech. At the 2011 party where I featured Susan’s trial, I invited guests to wear period costumes. One women chose a dress once worn by her grandmother, and others supplemented with hats and scarves. The tea table groaned with freshly-baked sweets. Grandmother Edna’s great-great grandchildren provided the entertainment — live music on violin and viola. I shared about the suffrage project I’ve been doing online since 2009. And then the trial skit. It was so much fun, I decided to do it again this year! I’ll write up the entire play shortly so you can see it doesn’t require a rehearsal, though you might do a test run first.

If you’re planning to send out invitations for a June 19th Susan B. trial speech party, consider attaching this promotional video link. Send me an email at suffragewagon at gmail dot com if you need any encouragement!

Suffrage Wagon BookshelfOn June 2, Publishers Weekly released its review of Jill Zahniser and Amelia Fry’s biography of Alice Paul. It’s a starred review of Alice Paul: Claiming Power by J.D. Zahniser and Amelia R. Fry.

“Zahniser and Fry’s biography shines a bright light on the ‘elusive’ figure of suffragist Alice Paul (1885–1977). A woman whose life bridged the ‘first’ and ‘second waves’ of feminism, Paul was once a towering figure in American suffragist politics, having cut her teeth on the battle for women’s voting rights in Britain. The elegantly constructed narrative combines the filaments of Paul’s precocious life into an incisive tale, beginning with her Quaker upbringing and following her as she emerges as an activist and agitator.

“The book shows how Paul navigated the shoals of propriety, respectability, and the necessity of forthright activist tactics. In addition, Zahniser and Fry (who died in 2009) effectively explore the often forgotten warrens of feminist history and its intersections with world events, including WWI. The authors deserve credit for tackling the issue of racism within the suffrage movement, as well as Paul’s latent prejudices. While showing how Paul became a suffragist, and the battles that defined a generation of fractious feminist activism, the book leaves the rest of her long life, after 1920, to other scholars. This is not only the story of one person, but of her epoch and culture. Zahniser and Fry have done readers a profound service.”

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with news and views of the suffrage movement. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote. Carry on the “Spirit of 1776.” If you’re off on a historical road trip this summer, check in with LetsRockTheCradle.com for suggestions and ideas.