Tag Archives: Suffrage Wagon

Kearns Family Members Got Together over the Holidays: Marguerite’s Musings

Marguerite's Musings

It’s always fun to stumble on a family connection. It’s one thing to know that my Kearns relatives are still based in Beavertown, PA where my grandfather Wilmer Kearns was born. And it’s even more exciting to know the extent of their ties and how they spent the holidays visiting, either in the NYC area or Beavertown, PA

I found a social notice of Max and Peg Kearns (Wilmer’s brother and sister in law) visiting Wilmer and Edna Kearns in 1917 in the South Side Observer of Long Island, December 30, 1917. “Mr. and Mrs. Charles Maxwell Kearns, of Pennsylvania, are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Kearns for several weeks.”

I’m busy documenting how Wilmer Kearns served as treasurer of Kearns Motor Car Company, the family business,  when he and Edna lived in New York City. And Lulu Kearns, Wilmer’s sister, played an important part of suffrage organizing with my grandmother Edna Kearns in 1913.

A holiday video greeting.

Another opportunity to celebrate the holidays with the Suffrage Wagon on Vimeo.

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A view of the suffrage wagon at the Smithsonian in Washington, DC

Suffrage Wagon features suffrage wagon in Smithsonian collectionThis is a sister to the “Spirit of 1776″ wagon that inspired this web site. This suffrage wagon (photo left) has been exhibited in recent years at the Smithsonian where it is part of the permanent collection.

Let’s get both of these wagons on exhibit at upcoming suffrage centennials.

MEASUREMENTS of suffrage wagon in the Smithsonian collection: Overall: 100 in x 67 in x 103 in; 254 cm x 170.18 cm x 261.62 cm, ID NUMBER: 1982.0288.01.

Originally a bakery or milk delivery wagon, tradition says that Lucy Stone used this wagon at speaking engagements and to distribute the Woman’s Journal. Around 1912 suffragists found the wagon in a barn on Stone’s property. They painted it with slogans and continued to use it to sell the Woman’s Journal as well as for rallies and publicity.

Lucy Stone, one of the so-called “19th century triumvirate” of woman’s suffrage and feminism, along with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, was one of the organizers of the first national women’s rights convention in 1850. In 1869 she founded American Woman Suffrage Association. More moderate than Susan B. Anthony’s National Woman Suffrage Association, it admitted men as well as women and it was committed to passage of the 15th amendment. In 1870 Lucy Stone founded the Woman’s Journal to disseminate information about women’s rights topics.

Our vision: that suffrage wagons like this one and the “Spirit of 1776″ campaign wagon are placed on exhibit during the upcoming suffrage centennials. Follow suffrage centennials news and events at SuffrageCentennials.com

FacebookCOMING SOON: Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Please join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

A happy Thanksgiving for 2014!

Happy Thanksgiving from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. And we’re looking forward to making Chinese fortune cookies for Chinese New Year!!

Happy ThanksivingFollow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

Happy Thanksgiving!

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Comment on the Suffrage Wagon blog to register your views and observations. Follow the news about suffrage centennials while celebrating women’s freedom to vote.

Day #12: Video of youngest White House picket and Podcast #7 of “Night of Terror”

"Night of Terror" podcasts on Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

Day #12. We’re getting close to the end of the “Night of Terror” audio podcasts, but the observance continues until November 15th. Listen to Podcast #7.

By popular demand: A video about Serena Kearns, the youngest White House picket (see below). The video highlights a variety of Votes for Women activities and events where Serena took part, including the organizing journeys of the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon in 1913.

Serena Kearns, youngest White House picket

Podcast #7 highlights the indignant words of the women who were held at the Occoquan Workhouse. The terror continues at the workhouse, as Doris Stevens continues in her description of how the administration of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson attempted to squash the rebellion of the prisoners. Pickets at the White House became increasingly more unacceptable to the federal government. Keep in mind that the picketing of the White House continued while those at the Occoquan Workhouse carried their protest forward.

I’ve been blogging  for a total of eleven days now in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

Share Podcast #7 of the audio series, the “Night of Terror.” Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West. From Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920.

Get behind Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in funding and building a memorial to the brave women who picketed the White House and experienced the “Night of Terror.” Let’s make sure the memorial is complete before or in time for the 2020 votes for women centennial that will honor American women voting for 100 years. Think of it. Imagine it. Support it.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4), Day #5 (Nov. 5). Day #6 (Nov. 6). Day #7 (Nov. 7). Day #8 (Nov. 8), Day #9 (Nov. 9), Day #10 , (Nov. 10), Day #11,  (Nov. 11).

Audio podcast series of the “Night of Terror.” Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3.  Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Subscribe to email postings on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Day #3 of “Night of Terror” Observance: Audio podcasts and Marguerite’s Musings

Edna Kearns, New York suffrage activistby Marguerite Kearns

Day #3. For the past two days I’ve been sharing some background about the suffrage movement as we move forward toward November 15th, the “Night of Terror.” Notice how we’re easing into the subject matter. The topic can be a rocky road at some points. So buckle your seat belt. Some audio podcasts are stored in my back pocket to share with you this posting.

After dragging you from the White House gates (with the music video) to the workhouse (YouTube), it’s time to lighten things up. Let me introduce you to my grandmother, Edna Kearns. Here she is, over to the left. We’ll hang out with Grandmother Edna a few minutes. No doubt she’ll tell you  it wasn’t long before she was in the thick of the suffrage movement action in New York City and then off picketing the White House in 1917. Many of my friends and associates have adopted Edna as their own grandmother because she represents our collective grandmothers and great grandmothers and family members who were involved in the movement. They made it possible for us to vote. Make sure you get to the polls Tuesday. Winning the franchise was no small accomplishment.

This is my third day blogging in honor of the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial has a web site and blog. You can also follow on Twitter and Facebook. There’s a lot of activity going on at Turning Point’s Twitter while it must seem like Suffrage Wagon is more like a classroom. Just the background, folks! Then we’ll get into the thick of things!

Vote graphic on Suffrage Wagon Nes ChannelLet me be clear. Grandmother Edna Kearns didn’t experience the “Night of Terror” at the Occoquan Workhouse. But Edna and little Serena Kearns were on the White House picket line showing their support, as were hundreds of women across the United States.

The campaign to win the vote started back in 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York. Actually it started earlier, but Seneca Falls became the launching pad. This is significant because the years from 1848 to 1917 were uphill. You know the drill: one step forward, one step backward and so on. By 1917 the women hit the streets with picket signs.

HOMEWORK ALERT: An assignment to spread over the next few days. Listen to the nine-podcast audio series linked here called “Playing Politics with the President.” Yes, it’s long, though each audio podcast averages no more than three minutes. Just enough time to squeeze it into your busy schedule.

In order to appreciate the story of the women of the Occoquan Workhouse, it’s helpful to understand the larger picture. American women were patient souls, but sooner of later they hit a brick wall. The audio series spells out in detail how U.S. President Woodrow Wilson and the two major political parties put roadblock after roadblock in the paths of the suffragists. They may have been patient souls, but their patience eventually wore thin. Audio by Librivox in the series “Playing Politics with the President.” The account is from the 1920 book by Doris Stevens, “Jailed for Freedom” that’s in the public domain.

For your reference: Here’s the entire “Playing Politics with the President” story series: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9  about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House, followed by prison time for many at the Occoquan Workhouse.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2).

Suffrage Wagon Cooking SchoolFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Support our partner, Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association. SWNC quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Day #2: Video homework assignment for the “Night of Terror”- Marguerite’s Musings

Marguerite's Musingsby Marguerite Kearns

It’s November 2nd. Day #2 of the two-week “Night of Terror” observance. This is a heavy-duty excursion into the history of the American suffrage movement. The folks planning for a suffragist memorial outside of Washington, DC in Lorton, Virginia are reaching out for help. So buckle your seat belt if you plan to move forward. In Day #1 of our postings, the music video about the White House picketing produced in 2012 by Soomo Publishing was a great place to start.

Today, there’s the selection from the film, “Iron Jawed Angels” about the women sent to the Occoquan Workhouse in 1917. The first video covered outside in the streets, at the gates of the White House. The second video goes inside the Occoquan Workhouse. Here’s the video selection from YouTube.

These two videos are in the service of supporting the proposed suffragist memorial in Lorton, Virginia. Suffrage Wagon is partnering with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial in the campaign to build a memorial to the women who cooled their heels behind bars so we can vote today. If all goes well, the memorial will open before or in time for the votes for women centennial in 2020 when American women will have been voting for 100 years.

Turning Point Suffragist Memorial has a web site and blog. You can also follow on Twitter and Facebook.

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Suffrage centennials are getting a lot of play…

"Night of Terror" podcasts on Suffrage Wagon News ChannelSuffrage centennials are getting a lot of play these days. There’s special programming on WAMC Albany, NY today about the upcoming election called “Susan B. Anthony Voted. Did you?” And the upcoming “Night of Terror” podcasts to commemorate November 15th are in the works. Stay tuned! Both events above have the 2020 suffrage centennial celebration in mind.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series in the event you missed any of the episodes: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party to picket the White House followed by prison time in 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

The audio series “Playing Politics with the President” is the background context to the upcoming “Night of Terror” audio podcasts. The audio podcasts are from Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920 book. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West and others.

FacebookCOMING SOON: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Please join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.