Tag Archives: suffrage movement

Podcast #5: After the convention… “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” with Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady StantonPodcast #5: After the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, the fire was lit for discontent in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. Ministers criticized the convention from the pulpit and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others wrote letters to the editors of newspapers defending their actions; they accepted invitations for speaking publicly, and more. Audio: Librivox. A production of Suffrage Wagon News Channel. This seven-podcast audio series is from “Eighty Years and More,” Stanton’s memoir that has been divided up into short segments of approximately two minutes each in order for more people to familiarize themselves with Elizabeth Cady Stanton from her perspective at this pivotal time in history.

Don’t forget to contact your rep in the U.S. House of Representatives to register your support for the Harriet Tubman national park project…act now before Congress closes its doors for the summer recess.

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“Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”: Podcast #4 by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady StantonPodcast #4. If Elizabeth Cady Stanton had known in advance about the public reaction to the 1848 women’s rights convention,  she might not have had the courage to set events in motion. But once over, she notes that conventions like the one in Seneca Falls happened all over New York State. Listen to Stanton herself continue telling the story in the fourth installment of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.”

Today is the last day of “Convention Days” in Seneca Falls, the annual event that highlights the significance of the Seneca Falls convention and attracts visitors to the town. This year’s innovative programming will, no doubt, bring more attention than ever to the festivities. The town is decked out and ready for the extra traffic in town. These podcast selections are from Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s memoir, “Eighty Years and More.” Audio, Librivox. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

“Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”: New podcast series plus Convention Days!

Street sign in Seneca Falls, NYA seven-podcast series called “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” describes the atmosphere in the area leading up to the 1848 women’s rights convention.

If you’ve ever have thought about attending Convention Days in the town of Seneca Falls, NY… the July 18-20, 2014 weekend is the right time to do it.

Meet Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her descendants; kayak the First Annual Convention Paddle; have your head read by a phrenologist; hear speakers Nadia Shahram and Daisy Kahn; tour Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s home; march in the Women’s Rights procession; tour local museums; attend dinners, receptions, films, and the Side Walk Festival. Check out the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls as well. The town is located in the “cradle” of the women’s rights movement in New York State. It’s considered the historic gateway to the Finger Lakes. Official schedule for Convention Days 2014.

Visiting Seneca Falls  requires an engagement with story, even before you get there, so it’s great timing to find out about the context of the times as it was back in the 1840s.

PODCAST #1: “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” This short audio file features Elizabeth Cady Stanton speaking about what it was like to arrive in Seneca Falls prior to 1848. This is the first podcast of a series of seven from “Eighty Years and More” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Audio by Librivox. A Suffrage Wagon News Channel special.

Don’t set out for Seneca Falls without checking on times that the Women’s Rights National Historic Park will be open.  The park’s visitors center is open often, but not daily. Special ranger programs feature information about the 1848 women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls. Information about house tours are available at the park’s web site.

Video about visiting Seneca Falls, New York that features several local historical sites and images from the national park visitors’ center. On the weekend of July 18-20, 2014 a group of Muslim women will make history in Seneca Falls by announcing a “Declaration of the Equities for Muslim Women” that’s part of the Convention Days 2014 program. A national tour team launched a national women’s economic agenda in Seneca Falls on June 1st, an initiative organized by Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and honoring the groundbreaking 1848 women’s rights convention.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. To stay up to date through email, Twitter or Facebook, visit the wagon site.

Videos on what you’re missing if you can’t visit Seneca Falls, NY this summer

Image from "Puck"

 

 

BELOW:

New video featuring the highlights of Seneca Falls, New York –the birthplace of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

BELOW: Video highlighting the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments read at the first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon that from now through July 20th will highlight Seneca Falls, New York and the annual events there commemorating this important occasion in American history.

Happy Fourth of July! Enjoy little-known story of how suffrage activists crashed a national centennial celebration!

Fourth of July 1876HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY:

The Suffrage Wagon summer newsletter is on the stands. It spells out what happened on the Fourth of July in 1876 when five suffrage activists crashed the national centennial celebration in Philadelphia… a little-known story that’s also an important part of our national history.

See link and forward to the people on your social media list as a way to deepen the appreciation of our past and how it links to our present. Link to story. The story involves Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Phoebe W. Couzins, Sara Andrews Spencer, and Lillie Devereux Blake. There’s even an audio podcast where the event’s described by Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.

 

New initiatives to link the past with the present: Seneca Falls and the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation

NewsNotesSWNC Two important announcements from the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement of the United States (upstate NY) represent a trend of bringing the past out of isolation and linking a rich cultural heritage to social issues relevant for our times. These initiatives include the Girl Ambassador program of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation in Fayetteville, NY, the appointment of a new Gage historic site manager and director, and the upcoming Convention Days 2014 celebration in Seneca Falls, NY from July 18 to 20.

After a period of reorganization,  last week  the Gage Center announced a new director and site manager, Sarah Flick, and an expansion of the focus to carry on the work of social activist and writer Matilda Joslyn Gage (who inspired the center) in order to make her life and work relevant for the present day. The Gage Center web site describes the changes as a “new chapter”. The Gage Center’s programs are ongoing at the Fayetteville historic site.

Convention Days in Seneca Falls, NY from July 18 to 20 will  feature much more than period costumes, processions and speeches in 2014. This year’s program will include a declaration of the rights of Muslim women, an initiative that has already caused a stir. “Diversity and Equality –Local, State, National and Global” involves the town of Seneca Falls in its commemoration of the 1848 Women’s Rights Convention. A full schedule of events for Convention Days, recently released, highlights a wide variety of events that’s expected to attract visitors, tourists, and women’s rights enthusiasts from across the nation and abroad. The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls , NY recently announced its acquisition of the old mill property that represents a major move to showcase the organization’s offerings.

For an ongoing update on these and other initiatives, follow the Suffrage Wagon as well as LetsRockTheCradle.com  Submit event listings to the LetsRockTheCradle calendar at LetsRockTheCradle at gmail dot com

Marguerite’s reminders about June 19th, plus Susan B. Anthony resources

Marguerite's MusingsI love the ongoing discussion about Susan B. Anthony on this blog and the implications of what it must have been like for Susan to devote her life to the vote. Today we can take on challenges, like Susan did, that are meaningful (and even have fun) while making a difference.

How would Susan respond to this free-spirited poem presented recently about our suffrage activist ancestors at a Slam Poetry event? Check out “Suffragette 69″ and smile –just when you thought there couldn’t possibly be any new angles relative to this part of American history.

Susan B. Anthony’s networking and advocacy energized her. When I took a bus trip last fall with Friends of the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, one point was brought to my attention –about how Susan took “power walks” around her neighborhood on early mornings. I loved hearing all about Susan, the activist, the sister, the family member, the cook, the human being, and so much more. Getting inside the personal lives of our suffrage ancestors involves getting to know them as people, as well as heroic historic figures. That’s why I love doing this work!

Susan B. Anthony’s June 19, 1873 speech can be found in lists of great American oratory. If you sign up for a speech class, there’s a possibility Anthony’s presentation may be referred to as a way to learn about the structure of powerful presentations. I’m looking forward to playing Susan today at a  birthday party. For the past week or so I’ve been setting aside a few items: a long dress, hat, cape, plus an edited version of her speech. It’s great fun to add a skit to a birthday celebration.

Susan B. Anthony resources: Short video introducing Susan’s trial speech for illegal voting on June 19, 1873. Audio selection (three minutes) about Susan B. Anthony’s famous 1873 trial speech from Doris Stevens’ book, “Jailed for Freedom.” A feature story about Barbara Blaisdell who has been interpreting Susan B. Anthony for the past 23 years for groups, organizations and for special occasions. My appeal to friends about the importance of making June 19th and Susan B. Anthony’s trial speech a national observance.  New book about Anna Howard Shaw, and author Trisha Franzen, makes argument about Shaw (video included) being “true heir to Susan B. Anthony” and attempts to separate fact from fiction. Visit the Susan B. Anthony Museum and House in Rochester, NY.

June 19th is not only the date when Susan B. Anthony gave her now famous speech at the Ontario County courthouse near Rochester, New York. It’s also a celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. The suffrage and antislavery movements were intricately connected, and this is definitely reflected in the wide range of events that can be accessed in the LetsRockTheCradle.com calendar. The Cradle site is a recognized resource destination and online community for events, historic sites, action campaigns, movement stories, and the many ways the past inspires our actions today!

The news notes shared here are by no means a representative sampling of what’s available online. But they give me an opportunity to keep up to date, and point out some noteworthy content I found online. For example, here’s an article about five commentators who still are angry about the fact that women won the right to vote in 1920. Link. Seneca Falls, NY will be the birthplace of a Muslim women’s rights declaration in July of 2014. Link. A conference in Detroit during July features women and their role in the Underground Railroad. Link. June 19th and a celebration about the end of slavery. Link. An overview of “male feminism.” Link. Observations on the stalemate concerning the governor’s Women’s Equality Agenda in the NYS Legislature. Link. Women and Canadian elections. Link.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement.