Tag Archives: Seneca Falls

Day #5 of the ‘Night of Terror” observance & the “why” of the White House picketing

Marguerite Kearns at Suffrage Wagon News Channelby Marguerite Kearns

I’m late getting the blog post Day#5 finished, but it’s still 10:54 p.m. where I am. One of my stalwart friends asked me the other day: “But why did the women picket the White House in 1917? Couldn’t they have expressed their point of view in some other way?”

Good question and one that I welcome in this fifth day of partnering with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial to raise awareness of and support for the building of a suffragist memorial to honor those brave women who experienced the “Night of Terror” at the Occoquan Workhouse near Washington, DC in 1917.

When you look at the 1917 picketing from a larger perspective, put yourself back into time. How would you feel as someone in the second generation of women petitioning for the right to vote? Then turn the clock back to 1848 and the women’s convention at Seneca Falls, NY. This wasn’t the first occasion when women decided that enough was enough. But it’s the date when we start counting as far as the suffrage movement is concerned –when there’s no doubt that the nation heard the rumblings from impatient citizens who demanded participation in the public arena. The suffrage movement started in 1848 and concluded in 1920 with the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Keep this in mind: it was touch and go for a great deal of that time.

Think of it. Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and others spent 50 years petitioning for the vote by the turn of the 20th century. This is when my grandmother Edna Kearns and her generation stepped up to the plate and took over from the first wave of activists. By 1917, women had been working themselves into states of exhaustion by continuing to pressure for the right to vote. I’ve written a lot about Grandmother Edna Kearns. Here’s a video where she speaks for herself.

By 1917, my grandmother Edna B. Kearns had been in the suffrage fold for at least a decade. When’s the last time you spent ten years working on a single cause? Did you burn out? Were you even a bit annoyed or frustrated at your lack of progress? When the National Woman’s Party announced the White House picketing in 1917, many activists didn’t hesitate to join. However, others condemned them for taking such a bold action. The “suffrage movement” wasn’t one movement. It existed under an umbrella of women from many backgrounds.

Women joined the picket line from all over the United States. The National Woman’s Party needed people on the front lines who were prepared to go to prison, if necessary. And without the extraordinary support network that stretched across the United States, the campaign wouldn’t have been as effective.

This is Day #5 of blogging to honor the “Night of Terror” observance on November 15th, a partnership with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association.

COMING SOON: The eight audio podcast series called the “Night of Terror.” You’ll get a ring-side seat account about what happened on November 15, 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

November 15th “Night of Terror” Blogging: Day #1 (Nov.1); Day #2 (Nov.2); Day #3 (Nov. 3). Day #4 (Nov. 4)

FacebookFollow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Marguerite’s Musings and Podcast #7, “Playing Politics with the President”

Marguerite's Musings

I’m delighted to announce that my cousin Rosalie Morales Kearns has launched a new press in Albany, New York specializing in women’s writings:

Shade Mountain Press. The first title, Egg Heaven, has been favorably reviewed in Booklist and Foreword Reviews. This is terrific news! I’ve been curled up in the outside hammock reading Egg Heaven during the late afternoon over the past few days.

PODCAST #7: “Playing Politics with the President.” We’re getting close to the end of the audio podcast series. Here’s the series so far: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7 of the nine-audio podcast series about Woodrow Wilson and the suffrage movement. The audio podcasts are produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. From Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920.

A LAST MINUTE REMINDER: VISIT SENECA FALLS, NY:

Edna on a horseYour last chance to see the colorful countryside before all the gold and red leaves are on the ground and cold weather has set in. This past weekend Seneca Falls hosted people attending the Seneca Falls Dialogues. And don’t forget that special programs are ongoing at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park as well as exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. Also, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s birthday is coming up in November.

The Richard P. Hunt papers are open to the public at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park for the purpose of research. It’s a special event celebrating Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. The Hunt House in Waterloo isn’t far from Seneca Falls. The Hunt papers include a thousand separate items dating from 1828 to 1856. Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls. A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf. Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers.

All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about upcoming programs.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Hot English Scones and Suffrage Wagon News Notes

PumpkinRecipesNew video for this posting, all about the audio podcast series.  Plus a reminder that the time is right to combine a fall trip to see the colorful landscape with events in Seneca Falls, NY. Get a shot of inspiration by watching the Seneca Falls video from Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

When planning a social event at home or for your organization, consider making English scones. They’ll be fresh out of the oven and won’t cost you an arm and a leg. At bakeries it isn’t unusual to spent up to $2 and more for a scone. Take note of the ingredients and watch for the video, coming soon, from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School.

Ingredients: 3 cups all-purpose flour; 1/2 cup white sugar; 5 teaspoons baking powder; 1/2 teaspoon salt; 3/4 cup butter; 1 egg beaten; 1 cup milk. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Process: In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut in butter. Mix the egg and milk in a small bowl and stir in flour until moist. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead quickly. Roll dough out onto a 1/2 inch thick round on a lightly floured surface round. Cut into eight wedges and place on the prepared baking sheet. Bake 15 minutes in the preheated oven or until golden brown.

Are you following the audio podcast series, “Playing Politics with the President?” A video reminder. This is the second series of podcasts from Suffrage Wagon News Channel. The previous series, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls,” is great to inspire you to plan a visit to Seneca Falls, NY this month. Check out events.

“Playing Politics with the President” summary: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5 of the nine-audio podcast series from “Jailed for Freedom” with Doris Stevens. This is the series so far: The programming starts with the big 1913 Washington, DC parade and moves into the suffrage deputations to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. The pressure is on to push for votes for women. Series production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

 IN OTHER NEWS: There’s a lot of fascinating news in cyberspace. How about the Australian suffragist who shook  up an empire? Visit the link. Historians are meeting in Amsterdam later this month to discuss how the digital revolution is shaping the study and presentation of history. Follow what’s happening with suffrage centennials around the nation on SuffrageCentennials.com

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Hitch up your horse and head for Seneca Falls, New York!

Edna on a horsePack your bags and hitch up your horseless carriage! Plan a fall trip to see the colorful fall leaves and put Seneca Falls, NY on your radar as the place to go this year. Sign up now for Seneca Falls Dialogues in October, find out about special programs at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park (see below). Find out about exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. And NOW for the first time: the opening of the Richard P. Hunt papers to the public. 

To celebrate Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park has opened, for research, a set of personal and business papers held by the family and private owners for more than 140 years. It’s a special event to celebrate Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. Remember that the Hunt House in Waterloo is around the corner from Seneca Falls. That’s where the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments was conceived of…over cups of hot tea with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others, including Jane C. Hunt.

The Hunt papers include a thousand separate pieces dating from 1828 to 1856.  Some examples include plans and contracts for workers’ housing, Waterloo Woolen and Cotton Mill records, letters of condolence, Richard P. Hunt, Jr.’s school essays, farm and store records. “Richard Hunt is an example of ’do everything and do it right,’” notes Ami Ghazala, park superintendent.  “Though the women’s movement was not built with bricks and mortar like his buildings in Waterloo, Richard P. Hunt, his family, and his business associates created a foundation of support that made the first Women’s Rights Convention in 1848  a success.  I invite everyone to take a look at his papers to find the man who boosted women.”

Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls.  A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf.  Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers. All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about our upcoming programs.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

 

Last and final audio podcast: #7 of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonThe response to the seven-series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” has been terrific. In this final segment, Podcast #7, Elizabeth Cady Stanton discusses three women friends in Seneca Falls, New York, her neighbors, and some of the problems facing women in family life.

This entire series of podcasts about the suffrage movement averages two minutes each, and it’s a handy resource when sharing the words of the suffrage activists themselves that bring them from the past into the present day.

 

Podcast #6, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonOnly one more podcast to go after this one!

Podcast #6. Elizabeth Cady Stanton speaks about how the Seneca Falls convention didn’t end in July of 1848. The convention defenders had to defend their position on women’s rights and this meant educating themselves about hefty subjects including law and philosophy. These early suffragists initiated a study group in Seneca Falls (along the lines of Margaret Fuller) and many townspeople participated.

The short audio segments are between two and three minutes in the podcast series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” One click away from the first five audio podcasts of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” Podcasts #1 through #6.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for other features like this one. Audio by Librivox.

Podcast #5: After the convention… “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” with Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady StantonPodcast #5: After the 1848 Seneca Falls convention, the fire was lit for discontent in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York. Ministers criticized the convention from the pulpit and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others wrote letters to the editors of newspapers defending their actions; they accepted invitations for speaking publicly, and more. Audio: Librivox. A production of Suffrage Wagon News Channel. This seven-podcast audio series is from “Eighty Years and More,” Stanton’s memoir that has been divided up into short segments of approximately two minutes each in order for more people to familiarize themselves with Elizabeth Cady Stanton from her perspective at this pivotal time in history.

Don’t forget to contact your rep in the U.S. House of Representatives to register your support for the Harriet Tubman national park project…act now before Congress closes its doors for the summer recess.

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