Tag Archives: New York

Hitch up your horse and head for Seneca Falls, New York!

Edna on a horsePack your bags and hitch up your horseless carriage! Plan a fall trip to see the colorful fall leaves and put Seneca Falls, NY on your radar as the place to go this year. Sign up now for Seneca Falls Dialogues in October, find out about special programs at the Women’s Rights National Historic Park (see below). Find out about exhibits at the National Womens Hall of Fame. And NOW for the first time: the opening of the Richard P. Hunt papers to the public. 

To celebrate Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park has opened, for research, a set of personal and business papers held by the family and private owners for more than 140 years. It’s a special event to celebrate Richard Hunt’s 217th birthday. Remember that the Hunt House in Waterloo is around the corner from Seneca Falls. That’s where the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments was conceived of…over cups of hot tea with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others, including Jane C. Hunt.

The Hunt papers include a thousand separate pieces dating from 1828 to 1856.  Some examples include plans and contracts for workers’ housing, Waterloo Woolen and Cotton Mill records, letters of condolence, Richard P. Hunt, Jr.’s school essays, farm and store records. “Richard Hunt is an example of ’do everything and do it right,’” notes Ami Ghazala, park superintendent.  “Though the women’s movement was not built with bricks and mortar like his buildings in Waterloo, Richard P. Hunt, his family, and his business associates created a foundation of support that made the first Women’s Rights Convention in 1848  a success.  I invite everyone to take a look at his papers to find the man who boosted women.”

Use the Hunt Family Papers weekdays by appointment from 9 to 4 at the park visitor center, 136 Fall Street, Seneca Falls.  A finding aid/guide is available on the park website at http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/upload/HFP-Finding-Aid.pdf.  Contact Vivien Rose, Chief of Cultural Resources, at 568-2991 ext. 5000 or vivien_rose@nps.gov to make arrangements to see the papers. All sites within Women’s Rights National Historical Park are free and open to the public. Follow the park’s social media sites for Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/womensrightsnps) and Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/WomensRightsNPS) to learn more about our upcoming programs.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

 

Podcast #3: “Playing Politics with the President”

Doris Stevens, author of "Jailed for Freedom"Podcast #3. This audio series places the “Spirit of 1776″ suffrage campaign wagon smack in the middle of the Big Picture nationally.

As the wagon headed out from Manhattan to Long Island in July of 1913 over one hundred years ago, women across the nation mobilized for the vote in Washington, DC. Awareness of such a historic occasion is at an all-time low. But it doesn’t diminish the significance American women’s organization on the grassroots.That’s why we’re running this series. Take a few minutes to listen and catch up with the previous audio podcasts.

“Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3 of the nine- audio podcast series.

The “Playing Politics with the President” audio podcast series has been produced by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox. Reading by J.M. Smallheer. From Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom. Image: Doris Stevens.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with posts twice a week and special newsletters published in the summer, fall, winter and spring. News, views, videos, audio podcasts. New music video, the “Spirit of 1776,” highlights the patriotic protest representative of the suffrage movement on the national, state and local levels.

Podcast #6, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonOnly one more podcast to go after this one!

Podcast #6. Elizabeth Cady Stanton speaks about how the Seneca Falls convention didn’t end in July of 1848. The convention defenders had to defend their position on women’s rights and this meant educating themselves about hefty subjects including law and philosophy. These early suffragists initiated a study group in Seneca Falls (along the lines of Margaret Fuller) and many townspeople participated.

The short audio segments are between two and three minutes in the podcast series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” One click away from the first five audio podcasts of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” Podcasts #1 through #6.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for other features like this one. Audio by Librivox.

Videos on what you’re missing if you can’t visit Seneca Falls, NY this summer

Image from "Puck"

 

 

BELOW:

New video featuring the highlights of Seneca Falls, New York –the birthplace of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

BELOW: Video highlighting the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments read at the first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon that from now through July 20th will highlight Seneca Falls, New York and the annual events there commemorating this important occasion in American history.

NYS state women’s trail dusted off during Women’s History Month, plus new women’s history exhibit at state Capitol

When we traveled on the blogging tour of the “Cradle” last fall, Olivia Twine and I documented the importance of storytelling about winning the franchise for women. We heard terrific stories in Johnstown, NY, the birthplace of Elizabeth Cady Stanton; the Harriet Tubman home in Auburn; the Matilda Joslyn Gage Center in Fayetteville; the Quaker meeting house restoration project in Farmington; and the Susan B. Anthony House in Rochester. Other venues for suffrage storytelling are opening up, including several milestones initiated by the State of New  York this month.

Seal of Governor of NYSA new women’s exhibit opened at the state Capitol in Albany, New York  in early March to highlight trailblazing women and advocates, as well as utilize the opportunity for a “final push” to win passage of the Governor’s 10-point “Women’s Equality Agenda.” The State of New York also dusted off its state women’s history trail as Governor Andrew Cuomo encouraged NYS residents and travelers to the state to visit women’s history sites.

We’ve been advocating for a fresh look at the state women’s trail from the legislature, plus funding and promotion, especially as the 2017 suffrage centennial approaches. Governor Cuomo’s State of the State address in January 2014 highlighted tourism and women’s issues. Many observers waited for even a passing reference to the 2017 centennial, but they may have to wait longer. This isn’t recommended as planning and development takes time when government is involved.

The State of California put significant funding toward its suffrage centennial several years ago. And Montana’s state centennial in 2014 may be a model that New York could have difficulty matching. An emerging theme from the state is of New York’s women leading the way. This is a great slogan. As suffrage activists insisted during the movement, they were more interested in “deeds,” not words. And this part of history deserves more than throwing something together at the last minute. We’ve been anticipating the 2017 suffrage centennial in NYS for a long time. Let’s make it the best ever!

We’ll keep you posted if New York continues to inch toward its 2017 suffrage centennial planning. No word out of state government about how the centennial will be acknowledged, let alone celebrated. With the truckloads of state funding directed toward special interest tourism, not a peep yet about 2017 and how it represents an extraordinary opportunity for education, celebration, and economic development.

The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, NY has announced the “Showcasing of Great Women” exhibit that premiered on the Google Cultural Institute on March 8, 2014. The exhibit features inductees whose contributions are recognized in social reform, business and technology.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement: yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

 

One hundred years ago on Long Island: Suffrage Stories

Suffrage Wagon Stories

Have a cup of tea with your suffrage stories and fortune cookies

by Marguerite Kearns

PART I:

The suffrage movement was big news in 1913, but Votes for Women activists had their eye on Long Island well before the turn of the 20th century. Women, in general, organized themselves into a complex web of local clubs and community groups throughout the island to promote everything from reading circles to the support of community institutions, the establishment of libraries, and a wide variety of social issues.

Newspaper accounts document that the state suffrage association sent representatives to Long Island women’s club meetings prior to 1900. On occasion, these women were keynote speakers at club luncheons and special events. Often it was enough for a newspaper article to document the presence of suffragists at club meetings which implied that Long Island represented fertile ground for the cause.

The first Long Island suffrage organizing meetings were held in private homes and informal settings. Organizing for the vote became more overt in 1912 with a “whirlwind campaign” of organizing that was covered in the state suffrage association’s newsletter and the local press.

Then on June 24, 1913, NYS Woman Suffrage Association president Harriet May Mills wrote to suffrage organizer Edna Kearns in a letter about her concern that the Women’s Political Union had been sending organizers to Long Island and  the state suffrage association better get busy making its mark. Mills wrote: “The W.P.U. has two workers on the Island and is trying to steal the whole of it.” She asked Kearns exactly when their volunteers would hit the ground running. Kearns replied that she was ready to take on the challenge, and she expected others to join her immediately. . .

Check out these videos of about one minute each that illustrate the Long Island movement organizing for Votes for Women.

WATCH FOR PART II OF THIS ARTICLE ABOUT THE EARLY DAYS OF SUFFRAGE ORGANIZING –LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK. COMING SOON. The main Suffrage Wagon platform changes often. Not familiar with us and want to know more? Check us out! And then subscribe.

NEW VIDEO: “This Wet and Wrinkled Paper”

“My voter’s card arrived today, and as I perused the tiny paper, wet and wrinkled from the rain, I felt the spirit of Grandma Edna watching over me,” Goldman-Petri wrote in a poem set to music and presented in this video.

“They stood on soapboxes, signed petitions, rang doorbells, smiled and dialed. They marched, paraded. They waited.  They waited, so I could have this paper.”

There’s more, and then the poem concludes: “My voter’s card arrived today, so thank you Grandma Edna. I’ll vote, I’ll lead, and I’ll succeed. I’ll remember how you fought for me. And it’s all because you believed, Women deserve liberty.”

As I post this video, I’m still reeling from last evening’s U.S. presidential debate where the two candidates, Romney and Obama, strutted on stage at Hofstra University, while outside police arrested the two Green Party presidential and vice presidential candidates –Jill Stein and Cheri Honkala. The two women political candidates were handcuffed to chairs for hours for attempting to be part of the public debate.

There was a time, once, when political parties other than Democrats and Republicans were part of a dialogue and a process known as democracy. Remember when the League of Women Voters organized the debates? The women organizers were inclusive, as if this were a radical idea. Then, the mainstream parties forced the League out of the job.

The so-called debate last night took place on Long Island –Grandmother Edna’s turf. My grandmother’s generation was familiar with women getting arrested for standing firm on the issue of participation and the democratic process. They believed in the Spirit of 1776.

For more information, visit womenssuffrage.org