Tag Archives: Alice Paul

Suffrage centennials are getting a lot of play…

"Night of Terror" podcasts on Suffrage Wagon News ChannelSuffrage centennials are getting a lot of play these days. There’s special programming on WAMC Albany, NY today about the upcoming election called “Susan B. Anthony Voted. Did you?” And the upcoming “Night of Terror” podcasts to commemorate November 15th are in the works. Stay tuned! Both events above have the 2020 suffrage centennial celebration in mind.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series in the event you missed any of the episodes: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led Alice Paul and the National Woman’s Party to picket the White House followed by prison time in 1917 at the Occoquan Workhouse.

The audio series “Playing Politics with the President” is the background context to the upcoming “Night of Terror” audio podcasts. The audio podcasts are from Doris Stevens’ “Jailed for Freedom,” 1920 book. Audio by Librivox. Reading by Kate West and others.

FacebookCOMING SOON: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter. Follow Suffrage Wagon News Channel with email twice a week, as well as on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. Please join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

New “Wonder Woman” Book, plus video, & final podcast for “Playing Politics with the President”

Wonder Woman bookThe Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore is out. I haven’t had a chance to order the book yet. The advance publicity says  the text makes a connection between Wonder Woman’s creator and the impact the suffrage movement had on him.

Today’s the last day of audio podcasts for “Playing Politics with the President.” My, you’ve been patient. Over the next few weeks we’ll be hearing the “Night of Terror” — a turning point in the suffrage movement in 1917 following the arrests at the White House and imprisonment at the Occoquan Workhouse. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial is holding its first annual “Night of Terror” observance from November 1 through the 15th as a fundraising event. Stay tuned!

VIDEO REMINDER: The fall issue of the Suffrage Wagon quarterly newsletter will be published soon. Make sure you’re subscribed. Issues are published in the summer, fall, winter, and spring.

PODCAST #9: “Playing Politics with the President.” Summary: As the activists of the National Woman’s Party ran out of options, Alice Paul and others shifted their sights to making suffrage a political issue and organizing the women voters of the Western states that won the franchise earlier than the rest of the nation. A comparison to the English suffrage movement is included in this final podcast of the series. The story is from Doris Stevens’ Jailed for Freedom, 1920. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

Here’s the complete “Playing Politics with the President” story series: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6. Podcast #7, Podcast #8, Podcast #9 of the nine-audio podcast series about US President Woodrow Wilson and the impending showdown over the issue of women voting. This is the leadup to when things became sticky and led to the National Woman’s Party picketing the White House and prison time in 1917.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon with email, on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Podcast #6: “Playing Politics with the President”

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Audio Podcast #6: In the story background of this audio series, many suffrage activists played a waiting game with U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. First, they decided to use each and every opportunity to work through the political system. Once everything else has been tried with no substantial results, they understood the necessity to move to another level.

This audio podcast gives the overview and background which means you’ll have to be patient sitting through a two-minute explanation of the view that persistence and determination will pay off… eventually. The tale is from real life. A waiting game. No car chases. Just the nuts and bolts of what it took over time for women to win the vote in the United States. Listen to this sixth podcast in the series about the long campaign in “Playing Politics with the President.”

The piece starts out by discussing the suffrage association’s annual budget spent on lobbying for an amendment to the Constitution in the context of suffragist Alice Paul’s leadership and organizing. If this is the first time you’ve checked into this audio series, you might be scratching your head and wondering what this is all about. The story: suffrage movement strategy is shifting from a state to a national strategy to win the vote. Soon in the chronology they’ll be considering a bolder and more direct approach. There are some nuggets of factual gold to be found in this descriptive swamp of Washington, DC politics.

SUMMARY SO FAR: “Playing Politics with the President”: Podcast #1. Podcast #2. Podcast #3. Podcast #4. Podcast #5. Podcast #6 of the nine-audio podcast series. The content is from Doris Stevens’ book, Jailed for Freedom, 1921. Audio production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivox.

VIDEO COMING SOON: Traditional English scones from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School on Suffrage Wagon News Channel. It’s a great idea when planning your next social gathering or fundraiser to invite friends, family, or for your organization.

FacebookFollow the Suffrage Wagon on Facebook and Twitter. Quarterly newsletters just by signing up. You can join the conversation by commenting on the Suffrage Wagon blog. Stay up to date with audio podcasts and videos. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote.

Podcast #2: “Playing Politics with the President”

Woodrow WilsonThis second audio podcast of “Playing Politics with the President” is a provocative look at the determination of women to press the issue of their rights in 1913. I love the description of the first deputation to U.S. President Woodrow Wilson –and then the second and the third. We’re not hearing this account from people a hundred years after the fact. We’re fortunate to be able to  hear Doris Steven’s own words published in 1920 in “Jailed for Freedom.”

Podcast #2. “Playing Politics with the President”

I loved the description of the womens’ reaction to being led into President Wilson’s office and being asked to sit in rows of chairs, like a school room, with the Woodrow Wilson’s chair in front. Everyone in the women’s delegation admitted to being frightened by the formality. And Alice Paul’s questioning of the President is classic. No one would accept Wilson’s excuses. The women’s reactions are enough to bring a smile of support to our faces today. Essentially he told the women of the delegation that he had more important things to do besides caring about their rights. After suffragists gathered petitions from around the nation, they presented them to Congress and the Susan B. Anthony amendment was introduced, but the battle wasn’t over yet.

This audio podcast series is great if you have two minutes to get a sense of what it took for American women to win the vote. Last week we featured Podcast #1. Take some time each weekend to relax to listen and add to your awareness of the continuing drama of “Playing Politics with the President.” We’ll be sharing a new audio podcast in the series every weekend. Production by Suffrage Wagon News Channel. Audio by Librivix.

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Find out about the Seneca Falls Dialogues in Seneca Falls, NY in October at LetsRockTheCradle.com Registrations are possible now. Fall is a great time to travel. Imagine the colorful landscape and all that you can see in the vicinity of Seneca Falls, New York. Also, check with LetsRockTheCradle.com for other travel ideas when you’re in the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States.

 

Musing about my Susan B. Anthony speech, plus release of new Alice Paul biography

MKmusingsI’m still working out the details of my Susan B. Anthony speech for the party commemorating the June 19th presentation Susan gave at the Ontario County, NY courthouse. The occasion: her trial for illegal voting in 1873. The courthouse is located in what’s known as the “Cradle” of the women’s rights movement in the United States, not far from Rochester, New York –a great idea for historical road trips this summer.

Susan B. Anthony sure had spirit, and I wrote about it in Suffrage Wagon’s spring newsletter. After describing the upcoming party’s skit planning in the last blog posting, someone wrote in to note that Susan hadn’t actually been handcuffed. She’d held out her hands for handcuffs, but the arresting officer refused to comply before taking her downtown for booking. Many scripts are rewritten during the process. I love the feedback and need all the help I can get in this celebration of spirit.

Be forewarned, however. Susan B. Anthony’s 1873 speech isn’t for the thin skinned. Susan let loose about the injustice of second class citizenship for women. Her words are now included in lists of great American speeches. For someone like Susan B. Anthony to stand tall and give the judge hell must have taken courage and a truckload of chutzpah.

I love the potential surprises associated with Susan’s trial speech. At the 2011 party where I featured Susan’s trial, I invited guests to wear period costumes. One women chose a dress once worn by her grandmother, and others supplemented with hats and scarves. The tea table groaned with freshly-baked sweets. Grandmother Edna’s great-great grandchildren provided the entertainment — live music on violin and viola. I shared about the suffrage project I’ve been doing online since 2009. And then the trial skit. It was so much fun, I decided to do it again this year! I’ll write up the entire play shortly so you can see it doesn’t require a rehearsal, though you might do a test run first.

If you’re planning to send out invitations for a June 19th Susan B. trial speech party, consider attaching this promotional video link. Send me an email at suffragewagon at gmail dot com if you need any encouragement!

Suffrage Wagon BookshelfOn June 2, Publishers Weekly released its review of Jill Zahniser and Amelia Fry’s biography of Alice Paul. It’s a starred review of Alice Paul: Claiming Power by J.D. Zahniser and Amelia R. Fry.

“Zahniser and Fry’s biography shines a bright light on the ‘elusive’ figure of suffragist Alice Paul (1885–1977). A woman whose life bridged the ‘first’ and ‘second waves’ of feminism, Paul was once a towering figure in American suffragist politics, having cut her teeth on the battle for women’s voting rights in Britain. The elegantly constructed narrative combines the filaments of Paul’s precocious life into an incisive tale, beginning with her Quaker upbringing and following her as she emerges as an activist and agitator.

“The book shows how Paul navigated the shoals of propriety, respectability, and the necessity of forthright activist tactics. In addition, Zahniser and Fry (who died in 2009) effectively explore the often forgotten warrens of feminist history and its intersections with world events, including WWI. The authors deserve credit for tackling the issue of racism within the suffrage movement, as well as Paul’s latent prejudices. While showing how Paul became a suffragist, and the battles that defined a generation of fractious feminist activism, the book leaves the rest of her long life, after 1920, to other scholars. This is not only the story of one person, but of her epoch and culture. Zahniser and Fry have done readers a profound service.”

Follow the Suffrage Wagon with news and views of the suffrage movement. Celebrate women’s freedom to vote. Carry on the “Spirit of 1776.” If you’re off on a historical road trip this summer, check in with LetsRockTheCradle.com for suggestions and ideas.

Organizations carry on the work of suffrage grandmothers and great grandmothers today!

Turning Point

Are you familiar with Turning Point Suffragist Memorial?

The Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association needs financial help to begin construction of a national memorial to those women who went to jail to win the right to vote. Turning Point Suffragist Memorial must meet a November 30, 2014, deadline for funding initial construction. Let’s help them reach that goal! The land is purchased. The overall design is completed. Help pay for the engineering analysis and detailed engineering drawings. Find out more.

Alice Paul Institute: Historic preservation consultants, Preservation Partners, has teamed with the Alice Paul Institute to introduce a revised New Jersey women’s history website:  njwomenshistory.org. Take a stroll through the Alice Paul Institute gift shop online when looking for a gift. There’s a stone tile coaster, a utility apron, and suffrage pendants. The gift items are described in the December 2013 issue of the online newsletter, and you can sign up to keep in touch the rest of the year.

The National Women’s History Project has quite an offering for Women’s History Month items. Newsletters and special mailings feature birthdays and other special days in women’s history. Check out the web site. There’s a special Women’s History Month brochure that’s handy to print out. And the National Women’s History Project is sponsoring a gala dinner for its honorees of this year’s theme: “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage, and Commitment.” There’s a great tour of women’s history sites planned in Washington, DC as well. See web site for details.

Sewall-Belmont House: The historic headquarters of the National Woman’s Party. Great store for shopping. Collections, exhibits, programs, museum. Located in Washington, DC, the Sewall-Belmont House is a terrific travel destination. The Sewall-Belmont House makes suffrage history in the nation’s Capitol come alive. Don’t miss a visit. Tours available Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m.

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Correction: The book Alice Paul: Claiming Power coauthored by J.D. Zahniser and the late Amelia Fry will be released in July 2014, not September, as previously reported.

Upcoming Alice Paul book author claims new approach to suffrage leader

Book about Alice Paul: Claiming Power

Alice Paul: Claiming Power by J.D. Zahniser with Amelia R. Fry is an upcoming book expected to be published in September 2014 by Oxford University Press. Suffrage leader Alice Paul may have preferred to be remain out of the limelight as she organized the picketing of the White House and other controversial actions that resulted in the passage and ratification of the 19th amendment that granted American women the right to vote in 1920.

Scholarly works about Paul have been few and far between in recent years. One biographer simply gave up and said that Paul didn’t leave enough personal resources behind to be useful for historians. This upcoming book will be examined closely because Zahniser is expected to offer a new perspective about Paul’s entry into suffrage activism. She uses oral history resources gathered by historian Amelia Fry, as well as interviews with Paul’s friends and family. Fry’s extensive oral interview sessions with Paul are available online.

Upcoming: Women’s History Month in March and International Women’s Day on March 8th. Encourage young people to step forward!  Sign a petition and help high school students in California focus attention on the Equal Rights Amendment. Go to ERA web site and follow the progress (or lack of it) and how you can push things along.

Interesting links to articles to share: A provocative article from the Huffington Post about the sex lives of the founding fathers. A history of American women can be read between the lines, as well as directly. #1.  A novel by Sue Monk Kidd deals with the human issues associated with being a strong and independent woman during the time of slavery. #1.  A senior citizens blog recommends Seneca Falls, NY as a travel destination.  #1. #2.

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