Monthly Archives: October 2012

Suffrage Wagon News Notes: October 2012

I can’t help but pounce on all the references I can find to the suffrage movement in the media theses days.  There are so many I can’t keep up, especially during this election season. Start with the demand for Alice Paul coin that exceeds all expectations. Link A. Link A-1. Fans have been busy sewing the Kansas block for the online Votes for Women quilt project. Link B. Link B-1. For other blocks,  see below or subscribe to the quilt blog. Visit the Susan B. Anthony House in upstate New York on election day. Link C. Link C-1. We take for granted that women joined the suffrage movement easily. Not true. The cult of true womanhood worked against this. Link #1, Link #1a.

Ever taken a cruise to the Bahamas? Their 50th anniversary of women voting in the Bahamas raises some interesting issues. First, commemorative stamps that honor individual women and the movement’s origins. Link#2. Link #2a. And there are more news notes from all over: California celebrates 101 years of women voting and many make certain that leadership roles for women and girls continues as a priority. Link #3. Link #3a. Oregon talk is part of the state’s suffrage centennial: Link #4. Link #4a. Work on the online suffrage quilt project continues with the New Jersey star. Link #5. Link #5a. So much fuss about women voters. Link #6. Link #6a.

Teacher open house at Gage Foundation home. Link #8. Link #8a. Presidential debate fallout.  Link #9. Link #9a. Green presidential candidate Jill Stein talks about multiple parties and mentions suffrage movement. Link #10. Link #10a. Alice Paul coin update. Link #11. Link #11a. Suffrage movement in Canada. Link #12. Link #12a. Suffrage activism of a tenant noted in New York City building. Link #13. Link #13a. Suffrage play in the UK. Link #14. Link #14a. Women voters in Africa. Link #15. Link #15a. Presidential candidates woo American women voters. Link #16. Link #16a. Comedy Central refers to 1920 when American women won the vote. Link #17. Link #17a.

With each link we’re including the URL and a backup PDF in the event of broken links. Check out new videos published on Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

Illustration: Vintage postcard from the turn of the 20th century. From the collection of Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

“Sister Giant” conference makes link to suffrage movement

Have you heard about “Sister Giant”? Take a look at this video, below. It’s a promo for a November conference, November 10 to 11, 2012 in Los Angeles. What makes it especially interesting is the promotional teleconference I logged on to recently which described the upcoming conference. “We are the potential of Seneca Falls,” stated one conference organizer in the online introduction. “This amazing event will take place four days after the presidential election. No matter who wins, we’ll need to talk.”

Making the link between the past, present, and future is an important part of the conversation. The “Sister Giant” organizers are advocating a new model of relational leadership with a holistic perspective where women are claiming their own voices, working in alliance and not against each other,  and increasing the field of support and positive thinking.

There’s still time to still register for the “Sister Giant” conference. If you can’t make it to LA, you can sign up for the streaming conference for $35.

For more information about Suffrage Wagon News Channel.

Suffragists out of the Shadows: Plus News Flash!

History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I, by Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage. Free ebook, available online.

NEWS FLASH: Original 19th Amendment document on display at Clinton Library for a limited time. Special radio report by Malcolm Glover. Link.

EXTRA, EXTRA!!  A new book about Long Island women, published by The History Press, just came in the mail. I’m looking forward to curling up on the couch and reading Women in Long Island’s Past: A History of Eminent Ladies and Everyday Lives by Natalie A. Naylor, Professor Emerita at Hofsta University, editor of the Nassau County Historical Society Journal, and Long Island Historian. This puts Grandmother Edna and her times in a much clearer perspective.

I’m gearing up for a virtual birthday party in Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s honor on November 12, 2012 by reading the featured free ebook, History of Woman Suffrage: Volume I, with its 1157 pages. It’s the introduction to a six-volume set of the history of the woman suffrage movement started in 1881 and completed in 1922.

I breezed through the digital book with many clicks and slides, although it took considerable effort to digest the material. Consider it a detailed report from the Big Three of the suffrage movement (Cady Stanton, Anthony, Gage) passed on down to us today. Personal accounts, letters, original documents, reports, recommendations, meeting minutes, speeches, and much more were documented with a freshness and with an ear and eye to passing on an account of those precious moments.

If people laughed or clapped during a speech, it’s noted. The authors were aware that if they didn’t document the suffrage movement, no one would. And since women documenting their activism was a rare event, it’s all the more valuable for us today. Volume I is a remarkable document, considering it’s from a time period when women were infrequently seen and heard. I read my free version on Amazon, and it’s available on several other internet sites.

My favorite parts: the 1840 Anti-Slavery Convention in London where Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott hatched their plans for the Seneca Falls Convention (though it wouldn’t take place until eight years later) and the Seneca Falls Convention itself.

DON’T FORGET to send your birthday greetings on this form to Elizabeth Cady Stanton for her 197th virtual birthday party on Suffrage Wagon News Channel!

Suffrage Wagon News Channel has news and stories of the suffrage movement. Find out more!

NEW VIDEO: “This Wet and Wrinkled Paper”

“My voter’s card arrived today, and as I perused the tiny paper, wet and wrinkled from the rain, I felt the spirit of Grandma Edna watching over me,” Goldman-Petri wrote in a poem set to music and presented in this video.

“They stood on soapboxes, signed petitions, rang doorbells, smiled and dialed. They marched, paraded. They waited.  They waited, so I could have this paper.”

There’s more, and then the poem concludes: “My voter’s card arrived today, so thank you Grandma Edna. I’ll vote, I’ll lead, and I’ll succeed. I’ll remember how you fought for me. And it’s all because you believed, Women deserve liberty.”

As I post this video, I’m still reeling from last evening’s U.S. presidential debate where the two candidates, Romney and Obama, strutted on stage at Hofstra University, while outside police arrested the two Green Party presidential and vice presidential candidates –Jill Stein and Cheri Honkala. The two women political candidates were handcuffed to chairs for hours for attempting to be part of the public debate.

There was a time, once, when political parties other than Democrats and Republicans were part of a dialogue and a process known as democracy. Remember when the League of Women Voters organized the debates? The women organizers were inclusive, as if this were a radical idea. Then, the mainstream parties forced the League out of the job.

The so-called debate last night took place on Long Island –Grandmother Edna’s turf. My grandmother’s generation was familiar with women getting arrested for standing firm on the issue of participation and the democratic process. They believed in the Spirit of 1776.

For more information, visit womenssuffrage.org  

Suffrage Bookshelf: The life of Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women’s Suffrage and the First Vote by Dawn C. Adiletta

As the 2012 presidential election approaches and all the media coverage about extensive efforts to deny the vote to citizens, the spirit of Elizabeth Cady Stanton is stirring in the wake of her birthday on November 12, 2012. She’ll be 197 years old. Join us in celebrating at her virtual birthday party. For more information about the event, visit this link.

When I was young, my mother made sure my birthday and holiday gifts included books about famous and accomplished women. I didn’t realize then how unusual that was. Sadly though, I never had a book about Elizabeth Cady Stanton. These days Elizabeth Cady Stanton has considerably more recognition, although it’s too often, “Oh, that lady and Seneca Falls.” Which brings us to the part we all play in educating young people by passing on the torch of wisdom and appreciation.

This book, featured above, is available on Audible and worth listening to. Type “suffrage” into the Audible search engine, however, and only this work  comes up. It’s an excellent overview of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s life for young audiences. After spending a little over an hour with the audio version, it’s clear how much we owe to this one woman who changed the world. Someday when political parties are more interested in democratic participation rather than manipulating the outcome of elections, our suffrage ancestors will be given their due.

Combined with Stanton’s memoir (free as an ebook online), Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Women’s Suffrage and the First Vote, gifts us with the essentials of a life devoted to equal rights. The work provides details Elizabeth doesn’t tell you herself, including the resistance from her father and husband about her political activities. I love the part describing Elizabeth using her white hair and matronly figure so as to be less threatening to audiences when she laid out her radical views.

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NEWS FLASH: The story behind Grandmother Edna Kearns’ Suffrage Wagon

The blog of the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum in Washington, DC features the story of Grandmother Edna’s suffrage campaign wagon, especially the family stories. Check it out.

I’ve written stories about Grandmother Edna’s campaign wagon in the past, but this time I’ve included more in the Sewall-Belmont post, especially the role Grandfather Wilmer Kearns played in suffrage campaign work and the many ways in which Suffrage Wagon News Channel celebrates women’s freedom to vote.

The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum‘s location in downtown Washington, DC makes it a frequent destination for tourists and visitors from all over the world. The National Woman’s Party headquarters at the Sewall-Belmont House highlights a vibrant part of our past for the increasing numbers of people interested in this part of American history, especially the dramatic and difficult campaign for passage and ratification of the 19th amendment.

Storytelling is when our fabulous Votes for Women history comes alive. Share our stories.  Subscribe to Suffrage Wagon News Channel. An overview of the news channel.

 

More Suffrage News Notes From All Over

A lot’s going on to win the hearts of suffrage buffs:

FEEDBACK: “Suffrage Wagon News Channel is a terrific testimony to women’s achievements over 200 years and a guide light for the future about making sure women’s voices are heard across the globe and that they vote. This online source provides updated news and stories about the women’s suffrage movement. Full of stories, history, struggles and triumphs. This superb site bridges history and the present and paces the way for the future. Founder, writer and editor Marguerite Kearns has suffrage in her DNA. As the granddaughter of suffragist Edna Buckman Kearns, she designed this site to honor  strong women leaders throughout time, surrounding the women’s vote. Suffrage Wagon is the authoritative site on women’s suffrage. Join the movement today. Participate, learn, enjoy, celebrate great women leaders and get active.”

Mary Ford, Hewlett, New York_______________________

Update on Alice Paul coin; October trip to Gage House in Fayetteville, NY; UK women’s library saved; suffrage character on UK television noted; Bryn Mawr College award in honor of suffragist activists; locals celebrate suffrage history; suffrage supporter Frederick Douglass’ statue moved; obituary for suffragist;  find out about memorabilia for suffrage movement; concern over voter suppression; commentary about voting restrictions; uppity view about suffering suffrage; find out dates in October that are significant in women’s history from the National Women’s History Project. Suffrage centennial in Arizona: Link #1, Link #2; college student op-ed; rally against ID laws; Alice Paul dramatization; Texas suffrage event; comment on First Lady speech; Geeenwich, NY history blog has suffrage angle; voting in Washington State.