NEW VIDEO: “Spirit of 1776″ for Women’s Equality Day!

Songwriter and performer Eighty Bug

This new music video has people talking. Now you can get in on the act by watching the “Spirit of 1776″ on YouTube. Songwriter and performer Eighty Bugg assembled quite a remarkable group of musicians, stage hands, filmmakers, and living history staff at the Heritage Museum of Orange County in Santa Ana, California.

It’s a fabulous production inspired by the “Spirit of 1776” suffrage wagon. The music video was produced by performer and songwriter Eighty Bug; directors Edwin Carungay and Lesha Maria Rodriguez; art director Jon Lagda; and the Suffragist Sisters featuring Eighty (banjolele and vocals), her sister Savannah Creech (ukulele and vocals), Ashli Lee Christoval (ukelele and vocals), Laura Guaico (tub bass), and Lisa Lui (violin), in addition to Max McVetty (percussion), and the Integral JRAT (guitar, mixing and mastering). The Heritage Museum of Orange County in Santa Ana, California provided the sets and production support.

“We’re recognizing the efforts of our ancestors by creating an anthem for women everywhere to learn and sing together,” said Eighty Bug who composed and arranged the video’s lyrics and music. Her musical career has included performances in a variety of styles, including pop, hip hop, soul, R&B, rock, country, electronica, down tempo, and dance music. She continued: “Just as Americans fought for freedom from tyranny in 1776 and suffrage activists organized for equality starting in 1848 at Seneca Falls, NY, we must continue to support our sisters today in the Middle East, India, Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, as well as throughout the world who struggle for freedom today.”

The music video pays tribute to suffragist Edna Kearns and others who hitched a horse to the “Spirit of 1776” wagon and wore colonial dress to make the connection between the American Revolution and the unfinished social revolution that left out women. Kearns’ work symbolizes the combined efforts of tens of thousands of activists across the nation who over a 72-year period participated in the U.S. women’s suffrage movement. They worked in local and state campaigns as well as in the final push to win passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

For only the audio, the “Spirit of 1776″:

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Envision a NYS suffrage centennial celebration in 2017

Fireworks. Photo: Tom Walsh.The first stage is the dream, and then comes the planning and reality of a New York State suffrage centennial celebration in 2017. The facts are being collected and the dreamers called into action. Every month I’m on a conference call with others who are stepping up to the plate in terms of making sure that New  York State celebrates its 2017 suffrage centennial, and by this, I mean, big time. There’s a great deal to celebrate, and of course, in 2017 I’ll pull out the stops in terms of telling suffrage tales of old. If you’re interested in working on a suffrage centennial ad hoc committee, let me know at suffragewagon at gmail dot com.

Watch a short video with the comments of two 2017 suffrage centennial enthusiasts, Teri Gay and Antonia Petrash, who share their visions of how exciting such a 2017 NYS observance will be.

Video: “Thoughts about a New York State 2017 suffrage centennial.”

Often I hear people ask: “What’s the point of voting if the system’s stacked against us?” A bright spot on the horizon is The Center for Voting and Democracy. Celebrating how the vote was won translates into protecting the right, in spite of where one falls on the political spectrum. From the web site: “FairVote advances systemic electoral reform to achieve a fully participatory and truly representative democracy that respects every vote and every voice in every election. We work toward these goals by providing advocates with innovative research and strategic advocacy.” Sign up for email updates and get an overview of the nation.

Fresh corn is available right now at groceries and farmers’ markets. Choose the unhusked variety and check with Suffrage Wagon Cooking School in terms of preparing it, whether inside or outside, for juicy mouth-watering servings. It’s all in memory of Grandmother Edna Kearns who cooked and canned as a fundraiser for the suffrage movement.

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Two audio podcasts about August 26th, Women’s Equality Day

Have you ever heard the Joint Resolution of Congress that in 1971 designated August 26th as Women’s Equality Day?

The first audio podcast read by Amelia Bowen spells out the directive.

And the second podcast celebrates August 26th in song.

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Dress up like Susan B. Anthony, have fun at her festival this weekend, and other news notes

Susan B. Anthony dressupsSusan B. Anthony FestivalIf you love dress ups, and costume balls, then you’ll find lots of ideas on this blog about taking back Halloween. There’s also  step by step instruction about how you can look like Susan for your next suffrage-related costume party or event. You’ll join other notables including the Susan B. Anthony House & Museum’s Susan B. Anthony in residence, Barbara Blaisdell, who has been playing the part of suffragist Susan for more than 20 years.

There’s a good chance that Barbara Blaisdell will be among the participants in the 2014 Susan B. Anthony Festival scheduled to take place on Sunday, August 17, from noon to 5 pm in the Susan B. Anthony Park between Madison and King Streets in Rochester, NY. The occasion is the celebration of August 26th, Women’s Equality Day. There will be live music, entertainment, and walking tours of the Historic Preservation District. Tours of the Anthony House are also available. The event is presented by the Susan B. Anthony Neighborhood Association and the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House. For more information. 

As August 26th approaches, plan to observe Women’s Equality Day with your friends, family or organization. Posts, videos, audio podcasts are available as resources through Suffrage Wagon News Channel, as well as the National Women’s History Project. Take advantage of a brochure you can hand out to interested people and guests. And don’t forget to follow the Suffrage Wagon for news and views of the suffrage movement. Sign up TODAY for email posts, Twitter and Facebook. 

Last and final audio podcast: #7 of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonThe response to the seven-series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” has been terrific. In this final segment, Podcast #7, Elizabeth Cady Stanton discusses three women friends in Seneca Falls, New York, her neighbors, and some of the problems facing women in family life.

This entire series of podcasts about the suffrage movement averages two minutes each, and it’s a handy resource when sharing the words of the suffrage activists themselves that bring them from the past into the present day.

 

VIDEO: Roast corn from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School

CornMelonsROAST CORN VIDEO: Seasonal special from Suffrage Wagon Cooking School. Inspired by Grandmother Edna Kearns who canned corn, jams and jellies to raise funds for the suffrage movement.

Are you planning to do something special on August 26th, Women’s Equality Day? Resources from the National Women’s History Project. The NWHP also has a brochure for August 26th that can be downloaded to your computer and printed out. Do you subscribe by email to the NWHP? It’s a great resource.

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Podcast #6, “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls”

Elizabeth Cady StantonOnly one more podcast to go after this one!

Podcast #6. Elizabeth Cady Stanton speaks about how the Seneca Falls convention didn’t end in July of 1848. The convention defenders had to defend their position on women’s rights and this meant educating themselves about hefty subjects including law and philosophy. These early suffragists initiated a study group in Seneca Falls (along the lines of Margaret Fuller) and many townspeople participated.

The short audio segments are between two and three minutes in the podcast series “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls.” One click away from the first five audio podcasts of “Trouble Brewing in Seneca Falls” Podcasts #1 through #6.

Follow the Suffrage Wagon for other features like this one. Audio by Librivox.